Strict action towards human traffickers

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Human trafficking is one of the fastest growing crim

Data from HINDUSTAN TIMES

More than 8,000 cases of human trafficking were reported in India in 2016, while 23,000 victims, including 182 foreigners, were rescued during the year, according to National Crime Records Bureau data.

Last year, a total of 8,132 cases were reported from across the country compared to the 6,877 cases in 2015.

Of the total 15,379 victims in these cases, 9,034 (58%) were below the age of 18 years, according to the latest NCRB statistics on crime released for 2016.

West Bengal topped the list in reported cases of human trafficking at 3,579, accounting for 44% of total cases in the country. The state had reported 1,255 (18.2%) such cases in 2015, when it ranked second only to Assam.

Assam reported 91 cases (1.12%) of human trafficking in 2016, witnessing a drastic reduction since 2015 when it ranked first in the country with 1,494 (21.7%) such incidents.

Rajasthan with 1,422 (17.5%) cases was second on the list for reported human trafficking incidents in 2016, followed by Gujarat (548), Maharashtra (517) and Tamil Nadu (434).

In 2015, Rajasthan had reported 131 cases (1.9%) of human trafficking while Gujarat had registered 47 (0.7%).

Delhi is 14th in this list for 2016 with 66 reported cases of human trafficking, down from 87 such cases in 2015.

According to the rate of crime (cases reported per one lakh population), West Bengal retained the first position in 2016 followed by Union territories Daman and Diu (7) and Goa (18). Daman and Diu otherwise ranks 24, while Goa 18.

A total 23,117 human trafficking victims were rescued during 2016, with the police saving, on an average, 63 people a day.

While 22,932 of those rescued were Indian citizens, 38 were Sri Lankans and as many Nepalis. Thirty-three of the foreigners rescued were identified as Bangladeshis, while 73 from ‘other countries’, including Thailand and Uzbekistan, the NCRB data stated.

As many as 14,183 of the victims rescued in 2016 were below the age of 18 years, it said.

Human trafficking, prohibited under Article 23 (1) of the Constitution, includes forced labour, sexual exploitation or prostitution, domestic servitude, forced marriage, begging, adoption, child pornography and organ transplant.


Approximately 75-80% of human trafficking is for sex.There are more human slaves in the world today than ever before in history.
There are an estimated 27 million adults and 13 million children around the world who are victims of human trafficking.
Human trafficking not only involves sex and labor, but people are also trafficked for organ harvesting.
A human trafficker can earn 20 times what he or she paid for a girl. Provided the girl was not physically brutalized to the point of ruining her beauty, the pimp could sell her again for a greater price because he had trained her and broken her spirit, which saves future buyers the hassle. A 2003 study in India found that, on average, a single sex slave earned her pimp at least 250,000 rupees a year.
Although human trafficking is often a hidden crime and accurate statistics are difficult to obtain, researchers estimate that more than 80% of trafficking victims are female. Over 50% of human trafficking victims are children.
Human trafficking is the only area of transnational crime in which women are significantly represented—as victims, as perpetrators, and as activists fighting this crime.
Severe natural disasters have left millions homeless and impoverished, which has created desperate people easily exploited by human traffickers.
After sex, the most common form of human trafficking is forced labor. Researchers argue that as the economic crisis deepens, the number of people trafficked for forced labor will increase.
rape
Sex traffickers use a variety of ways to “condition” their victims, including subjecting them to starvation, rape, gang rape, physical abuse, beating, confinement, threats of violence toward the victim and victim’s family, forced drug use, and shame.
Family members will often sell children and other family members into slavery; the younger the victim, the more money the trafficker receives. For example, a 10-year-old named Gita was sold into a brothel by her aunt. The now 22-year-old recalls that when she refused to work, the older girls held her down and stuck a piece of cloth in her mouth so no one would hear her scream as she was raped by a customer. She would later contract HIV.
Human trafficking is one of the fastest growing criminal enterprises because it holds relatively low risk with high profit potential. Criminal organizations are increasingly attracted to human trafficking because, unlike drugs, humans can be sold repeatedly.

Some preventive measure so that we could make people aware abhout it.

  national, regional, state, and local evidence-informed training for professionals and other individuals who routinely interact with children and adolescents;

•    national, regional, state, and local public awareness campaigns; and

•    specific strategies for raising awareness among children and adolescents.

    development of evidence-based prevention strategies;

•    identification of risk and protective factors;

•    development and evaluation of short- and long-term intervention needs and strategies;

•    gender- and ethnic-responsive delivery of services (including physical health, mental health, legal, housing, and education) and support to difficult-to-reach populations;

•    comprehensive, multisector approaches; and

•    demand and its reduction

I request our indian government to make some brutal laws for those human traffickers..so that they could think once before doing this..

 



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