Petition Closed
Petitioning Human Rights

Make American Sign Language Courses an Option in Schools!

Day after day, the Deaf Culture are struggling to communicate with hearing individuals, the main reason is because they don't know sign language.

So, what if we made ASL courses an option in schools? It would improve their relationship with the Deaf Culture, as well as using it as a second language.

Did you know: The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) approximates that 17 percent (36 million) Americans report some degree of hearing loss.

According to 2005 estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO), 278 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss in both ears.

Worldwide, more than 188,000 people have cochlear implants. In the U.S., some 41,500 adults and 25,500 children and youth have been implanted.

93 percent of deaf children are born into hearing families; only 7 percent are born into deaf families.

Approximately 2-3 of every 1,000 infants are born deaf or hard-of-hearing.

20 to 30 percent of hearing loss in children occurs during infancy or early childhood.

The average age of identification of hearing loss in infants is two and one-half to three years of age, well past the critical period for speech and language development.

Educational performance of students who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing remains poor. The average reading comprehension of 18-year-old students was reported at just below 4th grade on the SAT-9

72 percent of families with children who use sign language do not use sign language with their children

Letter to
Human Rights
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Human Rights.

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Make American Sign Language Courses an Option in Schools!

Day after day, the Deaf Culture are struggling to communicate with hearing individuals, the main reason is because they don't know sign language.

So, what if we made ASL courses an option in schools? It would improve their relationship with the Deaf Culture, as well as using it as a second language.

Did you know: The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) approximates that 17 percent (36 million) Americans report some degree of hearing loss.

According to 2005 estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO), 278 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss in both ears.

Worldwide, more than 188,000 people have cochlear implants. In the U.S., some 41,500 adults and 25,500 children and youth have been implanted.

93 percent of deaf children are born into hearing families; only 7 percent are born into deaf families.

Approximately 2-3 of every 1,000 infants are born deaf or hard-of-hearing.

20 to 30 percent of hearing loss in children occurs during infancy or early childhood.

The average age of identification of hearing loss in infants is two and one-half to three years of age, well past the critical period for speech and language development.

Educational performance of students who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing remains poor. The average reading comprehension of 18-year-old students was reported at just below 4th grade on the SAT-9

72 percent of families with children who use sign language do not use sign language with their children

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Sincerely,