Multi-Unit Dwelling Smoking Ban in BC

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Anita Kanitz
Sep 20, 2021
It has to be said clearly. Secondhand smoke also causes lung cancer and lung diseases.
In the past, there was a lot of smoking at my workplace, especially by female superiors and their female bootlickers. The smoking female colleagues were, to put it clearly, more at gossiping and smoking than at work, the non-smoking female colleagues were only at work and contracted lung diseases such as asthma and bronchitis. That is bodily harm and as the only colleague I dared to complain, with success, from then on smoking was not only banned in our firm on site but in all our firms nationwide. I submitted medical certificates and scientific studies, and the sickness rate in our department was extremely high at the time due to continuous smoking.
Secondary smoking is the involuntary inhalation of tobacco smoke from the ambient air. The tobacco smoke gets into the ambient air on the one hand through re-exhaling the mainstream smoke during active smoking, on the other hand through the glow of the tobacco between the puffs, the so-called sidestream smoke. The latter accounts for the main part of tobacco smoke exposure in passive smoking.
In terms of its composition, tobacco smoke in passive smoking does not differ from tobacco smoke inhaled in active smoking. It contains toxic substances such as ammonia, nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxide, which irritate the eyes and upper respiratory tract, and carcinogenic substances such as the organic compounds benzene and vinyl chloride as well as the inorganic compounds arsenic, cadmium, chromium and the radioactive isotope polonium-210. Many of the toxic and carcinogenic substances are much more concentrated in sidestream smoke than in mainstream smoke. The result are numerous, sometimes serious illnesses
Secondhand smoke.
For example, secondhand smoke increases the risk of lung cancer and, very likely, breast cancer in young women and cancer of the nasal cavity and sinuses. It also puts a strain on the cardiovascular system and increases the risk of stroke by an estimated 20 to 30 percent. In addition, the susceptibility to infections increases. Secondhand smoke also causes or worsens respiratory diseases and can trigger headaches and dizziness.
Children are particularly at risk from passive smoking because they have a higher breathing rate and a less efficient detoxification system than adults. When their parents smoke, they suffer from otitis media and respiratory diseases more frequently
like bronchitis and pneumonia. It is very likely that secondhand smoke can also trigger asthma in children. Secondhand smoke worsens symptoms in children who already have asthma. In infants, passive smoking has a lasting effect on lung function and can lead to sudden infant death syndrome. Passive smoking during pregnancy can reduce the birth weight of the newborn and cause premature birth.
A very good friend of my husband died last year from his wife's extreme secondhand smoke, they had been married for 50 years. She is still alive, he died in agony.
My best female friend was a mediocre smoker, but her partner was a constant smoker who only stayed in smoky bars with her and his buddies. She died miserably of lung cancer after being with this man for 8 years. He is still alive and inherited her house.
Fate is a lousy traitor sometimes. Because it is not always the active smokers who die, but also the passive smokers in their environment.

Facts about Lung Cancer
How common is lung cancer in women?

Lung cancer is the largest single cause of cancer deaths in the United States. For years, men were at higher risk for lung cancer because of higher smoking rates. However, with more women smoking, lung cancer surpassed breast cancer in 1987 as the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Over the last two decades, lung cancer deaths have increased 150 percent in women, compared to an increase of about 20 percent in men. In fact, with all outside factors being equal, women have a greater risk of developing lung cancer than men. Several studies have suggested that estrogen may help lung cancers to grow, increasing the risk of lung cancer developing in women.
What causes lung cancer?

Smoking is by far the leading risk factor for lung cancer. Tobacco smoke causes more than eight out of 10 cases of lung cancer. The longer a person has been smoking and the more packs per day smoked, the greater the risk. If a person stops smoking before lung cancer develops, the lung tissue will slowly return to normal. Cigar and pipe smoking are almost as likely to cause lung cancer as is cigarette smoking.

People who do not smoke but who breathe the smoke of others (second-hand smoke) also have a higher risk of lung cancer. Second-hand smoke is the third leading cause of preventable death in America, yet nearly half of all non-smoking Americans are still regularly exposed to it. Non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

Asbestos is another risk factor. People who work with asbestos have a higher risk of getting lung cancer. If they also smoke, the risk is greatly increased. Arsenic and radon, as well as other cancer-causing agents in the workplace, are also risk factors. Other factors that increase a person’s risk include having had radiation therapy to the lung; personal and family history; diet; and air pollution.
What is the current treatment for lung cancer?

The best way to avoid death from lung cancer is never to smoke or to stop smoking. Once lung cancer is diagnosed, there are several treatment options, including radiation, various chemotherapies and surgery. Survival rates have improved for non-small cell lung cancer because of advances in combination radiation/chemotherapy treatment. However, small cell lung cancer (most often found in people who smoke cigarettes) is still very difficult to treat. Small cell is the most aggressive of lung cancers, and many patients have advanced disease by the time it is diagnosed. Small cell lung cancer is responsive to both chemotherapy and radiation, yet nearly all these patients eventually relapse and need additional treatment.

There is a clear need for more effective treatments for lung cancer. New advances in research have recently led to new drugs that can protect normal cells from being destroyed from chemotherapy.

Early detection remains the key to successful therapy. If you have a history of chronic coughing, coughing up blood, chest pain, shortness of breath, hoarseness or wheezing, on-going problems with bronchitis or pneumonia, swelling of the neck and face, loss of appetite or weight loss, or fatigue, you should be evaluated by your physician as soon as possible. Lung cancer is not the only smoking-related cause of death in women. The World Health Organization states that at least 25 percent of women smokers will die of smoking-related disease such as cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
How can I prevent lung cancer?

The best way to prevent lung cancer is to avoid smoking. If you currently smoke, ask your health care provider to assist you in finding resources to help you quit smoking. It is also important to try to avoid second-hand tobacco smoke, radon, asbestos and pollution, which can increase a person's risk of developing lung cancer. Controlling other lung diseases, such as tuberculosis can help prevent lung cancer, since there is evidence that lung cancer tends to develop in scarred areas of the lung. Finally, eating a good diet with lots of fruits and vegetables also may help prevent lung cancer.

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Aiden Mahe
1 year ago
Ive always hated smokeing

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Louise Welsh
1 year ago
I agree and have the same issues

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Mekan Bashimov
1 year ago
We need to stop this asap especially marijuana smoking!

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Kelly Foster
1 year ago
I have a little one and it's sucks that there are times I can't enjoy my patio or have the windows open when it's hot out because one of our neighbors smokes both weed and cigarettes and it's grouse because we're a none smoking family

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Celeste Biondo
2 years ago
I TOTALLY AGREE> I've started one for PA I hope people will sing. PLEASE https://www.change.org/stopsecondhandsmoke

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Anton Shendryk
2 years ago
I actually write letters to cities that I live in and local covernment. Petition is great but I always take extra steps

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larissa divakova
2 years ago
i am supporting againced any type of smoking at the bouildings, streets. .

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Allen Enriquez
2 years ago
All people deserve a safe, secure, peace, tranquility, and healthy environment to call home from elders, baby’s, furry family. No one should have to be exposed to harmful side effects of second hand smoke of any kind that is known to cause serious health related symptoms leading to long term health care cost sky rocking in the billions! So please if you have love ones quit smoking  you do yourself a favor and your wallet a chance for a better future in general. Instead go to nature, beaches, etc as that money can thrive your life long term and not face Degenerative spinal, organs etc!

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Anton Shendryk
2 years ago
Personally affected by smokers