Rename The Hillingdon Athletic Stadium to The Tashan Daniel Stadium

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We are calling for the Hillingdon Athletic Stadium to be renamed to the Tashan Daniel Stadium.  In September 2019, Tashan was murdered in the borough in an unprovoked knife attack at Hillingdon tube station.

Tashan Daniel Trained at The Stadium

Tashan's regular training at the stadium resulted in him being tipped to run at the Olympics; he could have represented both the borough and England. 

Why Rename The Stadium?

  • Demonstrate to our young people that the authorities care
  • Inspire the young in the Borough - a stadium named after a local young man who had become an Olympic hopeful
  • Bring positive publicity to Hillingdon
  • Turn a negative event to a positive one
  • Help local youth identify with the sports stadium
  • Demonstrate how Hillingdon is a strong community
  • Serve to launch an annual schools athletic event - Tashan Daniel Cup
  • Present a positive role model for everyone
  • Provide a lifelong memory of a life so cruelly cut short 

Who was Tashan Daniel?

Tashan Daniel was a loving son and brother, an amazing friend, cousin, nephew, and role-model.

A Talent Lost

Tashan had started to focus on his sprint training. His coach, Josh, explained Tashan's unique qualities:

“Tashan was what is generally known in track infield as a hybrid. He was blessed by nature with excellent athletic qualities. These qualities, to name a few, included highly compliant and elastic tendons. He also had extremely high levels of explosive power which is necessary for his chosen event of the 200m. Tashan recognized his potential and decided to focus his efforts and immediate future to training full time. He gave up his full-time job as a photographer to follow his passion in becoming a world-class sprinter. He met me in October of 2018 and we began to perfect his craft. This would include a five-day training schedule, three days of which were high-intensity track workouts with two days of easy active recovery sessions. He would also visit a sports therapy clinic two times a week to get massage therapy to keep his body at its optimal condition. His aim was to improve on his performances over a four year period until reaching the next Olympic games. In my humble opinion, Tashan Daniel was in the 90th percentile of talent range. With good training, nurturing and consistency, the world was his oyster. His mental approach towards both competition and training was that of a future world champion. His attitude towards hard work was nothing less than tenacious.”

see TashanDaniel.co.uk