Help San Francisco Become the First US City to Ban Shock Collars

Help San Francisco Become the First US City to Ban Shock Collars

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Ren @ Go Dog Pro started this petition to San Francisco Board of Supervisors

www.sf-shockfree.org

Our mission is to enact a city-wide ordinance banning the sale and use of shock collars/ecollars in San Francisco. St. Francis of Assisi, patron saint of SF and all animals, believed that animals are not subjects to be dominated, exploited, or abused. As the first city in the nation to ban the use of e-collars, San Francisco lives up to our tradition as a frontier of justice, rights for all, and progressive ideas.

We hope to inspire other cities and towns to follow suit. Electronic shock collars are an outdated and inhumane method of animal training and are currently banned in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Austria, Switzerland, Slovenia, Germany, the Netherlands, Wales, Quebec, and parts of Australia.

Top veterinary doctors and behaviorists agree that using aversive methods like electronic shock collars leads dogs to suppress or mask their outward signs of fear, often causing them to act suddenly with heightened aggression and with fewer warning signs when they feel threatened. In addition, after being repeatedly shocked, the dog may begin to feel unsafe, which can cause them to live in a constant state of fear. As a result, shock collar/e-collar training can make aggressive dogs more dangerous and put the public at risk. 

For the purposes of this legislation, a training e-collar (also known as a shock collar) refers to any device affixed to a dog that produces an electric current designed to decrease or change behavior, including electrical stimulation collars and anti-bark collars. This legislation does not apply to GPS collars and attachments (such as Whistle, Fi, or Apple AirTags) used for tracking.

Read the draft legislation and find out more at SF-ShockFree.org

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