Petition Closed

Help graduate more trained health workers in war-torn countries


Right now, women and children in South Sudan are trapped by a major health crisis. After decades of conflict, there is a massive shortage of trained health workers: in a country of over eight million people there are fewer than 200 doctors. Adding to the crisis, options for medical training in South Sudan are severely limited.

This massive shortage of trained health workers and lack of health care disproportionately affects the most vulnerable: women and children. South Sudan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world and one in eight children born here never lives to age five. 

These war-torn communities need the knowledge and skills to meet their own health care needs. That means providing training in primary and emergency health care, nutrition, sanitation, hygiene, and antenatal and prenatal care. 

Capacity building not only fosters self-reliance; it also builds the kind of confidence, pride, and self-esteem essential for political stability and successful development.

International Medical Corps is addressing this crisis. In the past year, their graduating classes of community midwives and certified nurses at the National Health Training Institute at Kajo Keji Hospital in South Sudan have significantly increased the number of trained medical professionals in the country. 

The experience and skills they learn during their training are invaluable: each trained midwife or nurse can reach hundreds of people in their own communities. 

With your support, they can train more community-based health care workers through programs like this one in South Sudan – one of the most underdeveloped areas in the world. Pledge to support programs like this and help provide healthy, hopeful futures for mothers and their children in South Sudan and other war-torn or underserved countries, like Afghanistan, Ethiopia, and Democratic Republic of Congo.

I pledge to support training for health workers in war-torn and underserved countries to improve medical care for women and children disproportionately affected by conflict.

These communities need the knowledge and skills to meet their own health care needs. That means providing training in primary and emergency health care, nutrition, sanitation, hygiene, and antenatal and prenatal care. Each trained health worker can provide care to hundreds of women and children in local communities.

I support programs that provide healthy, hopeful futures for women and children in war-torn countries.