Petition Closed
Petitioning U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and 6 others
This petition will be delivered to:
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Alejandro Mayorkas, Director
Congressional Black Caucus
Representative
Bobby Rush
Senator
Dick Durbin
Senator
Mark Kirk
President of the United States

Grant Temporary Protected Status for Malian Immigrants

Over the last twelve months, the situation in northern Mali has escalated, with the resignation of the Prime Minister and the inability of the government to respond appropriately to the destructive armed insurgency. 

Over 350,000 people have been displaced and many are unable to meet their basic needs as they struggle to recover from forced evacuations as well as the remnants of a severe drought earlier in 2012.

Given the current situation, deporting hundreds of Malians from the United States would only exacerbate this volatile climate and needlessly place people in perilous situations.

Temporary protected status (TPS) designation for Mali would protect those Malians in the US that need stability until the violence and conflict in their home country subside. TPS would allow those who are eligible to live, work, and study in the United States until it is safe for them to return home. In addition, TPS would enable Malians to provide support and aid to their families and communities, offering relief to those affected.

 

To learn more about the crisis in Mali, listen to our Malian Voices podcast from February 2013. 


Letter to
U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Alejandro Mayorkas, Director
Congressional Black Caucus
and 4 others
Representative Bobby Rush
Senator Dick Durbin
Senator Mark Kirk
President of the United States
As a Chicago-based coalition of African community organizations, United African Organization and allies are concerned about the ongoing crisis in Mali. We urge you to pay special attention to the status of Malian nationals that have been affected. We entreat you to grant Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Malians currently in the United States who are unable to return home due to continuing conflict.

For over a year, the situation in northern Mali has escalated, with the resignation of the Prime Minister and the inability of the government to respond appropriately to the destructive armed insurgency. Over 350,000 people have been displaced and many are unable to meet their basic needs as they struggle to recover from forced evacuations as well as the remnants of a severe drought earlier in 2012. Given the current situation, deporting hundreds of Malians from the United States would only exacerbate this volatile climate and needlessly place people in perilous situations.

TPS designation for Mali would protect those Malians in the US that need stability until the violence and conflict in their home country subside. As you know, students and visitors are particularly vulnerable as they have to adhere to strict visa regulations. TPS would allow those who are eligible to live, work, and study in the United States until it is safe to return home in Mali. In addition, TPS would enable Malians to provide support and aid to their families and communities, offering relief to those affected.

The United States has granted TPS to nationals of Syria, Sudan and South Sudan during ongoing armed conflict, unrest, and turmoil in those regions. When Haiti was ravaged by an earthquake, the administration responded by granting Haitians TPS. Temporary Protected Status is now an urgent need for Malian nationals in the United States as a protective measure to ensure their safety until the country is stable.

We urge you to designate Mali for TPS and would welcome a meeting with your staff to discuss this important issue.

Mali is a unique heritage of world civilization, and we urge the administration to work with the African Union and the Economic Community of West African States in restoring peace, stability, and security in Northern Mali.