Petitioning Governor Jerry Brown

Governor Jerry Brown: Grant Clemency for the California Twelve


Wrongful convictions are a continuing problem in the United States justice system.  The news media is filled with reports where individuals have spent decades in prison for crimes they did not commit.  Unfortunately, this is only part of the story.

Over the last 13 years, the California Innocence Project (“CIP”) has exonerated 11 individuals who were wrongfully convicted and served a combined total of more than 113 years in prison for crimes they did not commit.  In fact, you may have even heard about their most recent exoneree, Brian Banks.  What you haven’t heard about are the California 12.  CIP has identified 12 innocent clients, many who have been found innocent by a judge, yet remain incarcerated.  On April 27, 2013, CIP will begin a march from San Diego to Sacramento to hand-deliver clemency petitions to the Governor of California on behalf of these clients:

Please sign this petition to encourage Governor Brown to free these wrongfully convicted inmates.  To read more about their cases, visit our website at InnocenceMarch.com.  

Letter to
Governor Jerry Brown
Over the past decade, hundreds of innocent people have been released from prisons across the United States. It is now undeniable that our justice system sometimes convicts innocent people and sends them to prison. The California justice system has not been immune to the problems that have led to the conviction of the innocent. With the largest (over 160,000 inmates) and most expensive (nearly ten billion dollars a year) prison system in the United States, and many proven cases of wrongful conviction, there is a unique and compelling obligation to evaluate claims of innocence from California inmates and release those who have strong claims.

Governor Brown, we ask you to consider 12 petitions for clemency that have been prepared by the California Innocence Project. These 12 cases involve different facts, and each has taken its own unique passage through our justice system. What is the same in all of the cases is that there is strong evidence of innocence and each one of these 12 individuals has already served a long prison sentence.