Petition Closed

Recent studies have shown that modern shipwrecks on Pacific atolls have the capacity to leak iron onto coral reefs—leading to bacterial outbreaks and overgrowth of algae. The shift from healthy coral reefs to "black reef" covered in slime can occur within only a few years.

Some of the most pristine coral reefs in the world are currently protected under the US Fish and Wildlife's Marine National Monument system, but such protections are meaningless if shipwrecks are left to rot on coral reefs.

The US Fish and Wildlife service must act to immediately remove such shipwrecks from threatened reefs. In addition, investigations into the owners responsible for the shipwrecks should be made, so that private companies, not US taxpayers, foot the bill for such clean-ups.

Photo credit:joost-ijmuiden

Letter to
Project Leader, US Fish and Wildlife Service Pacific Reefs Susan White
I am writing to urge the US Fish and Wildlife Service to take swift action to remove toxic shipwrecks from some of our nation's most pristine coral reefs.

Recent studies have shown that modern shipwrecks on Pacific atolls have the capacity to leak iron onto coral reefs—leading to bacterial outbreaks and overgrowth of algae. The shift from healthy coral reefs to "black reef" covered in slime can occur within only a few years.

Some of the most pristine coral reefs in the world are currently protected under the US Fish and Wildlife's National Marine Monument system, but such protections are meaningless if shipwrecks are left to rot on coral reefs.

The US Fish and Wildlife service must act to immediate remove such shipwrecks from threatened reefs. In addition, investigations into the owners responsible for the shipwrecks should be made, so that private companies, not US taxpayers, foot the bill for such clean-ups.

I look forward to hearing of your strong leadership in bringing about removal of these shipwrecks, and launching investigations into identifying the parties responsible for such wrecks.

Sincerely,