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In 2001 at age 14, Kenneth Young was arrested for aiding his mother's drug dealer in a series of armed robberies. He was told she would be killed if he didn't help settle her debts. No one was harmed during the robberies. Subsequently, Kenneth was sentenced to FOUR CONSECUTIVE LIFE SENTENCES. In 2010, the US Supreme Court did away with Life Without Parole for Juveniles in non-homicide cases. Kenneth was re-sentenced to 30 years in prison. He is currently 29 years old and won't be eligible for parole until he is in his 40's.

Letter to
Office of Attorney General State of Florida The Capitol PL-01 Tallahassee, FL 32399-1050 Pam Bondi_Twitter: @AGPamBondi
Florida Governor Gov. Rick Scott, Twitter: @FLGovScott
Florida Supreme Court
'The retired judge lives in the deep woods southeast of Tampa, a quarter-mile down a narrow dirt road. Late in the afternoon, J. Rogers Padgett is brooding on how much he misses the courtroom. He has heard hundreds upon hundreds of cases over the years, so it's a long shot when he's asked if he recalls an armed robbery case from eight years ago. The defendant was a kid named Kenneth Young.
Yes, the judge says, he remembers it well. Young was all of 14 when he helped a 25-year-old crack dealer pull armed robberies of hotels around Tampa Bay. Young would take down the video surveillance cameras and grab the cash while the boss held a gun on the clerks and barked orders. No shots were ever fired. Padgett remembers the address of one of the hotels, the pile of video cameras in the back seat of the crack dealer's car when he and Young were arrested, Young's annoying courtroom behavior as he tried to avoid trial. And he remembers sentencing Young to life in prison. What he does not remember is that it was life in prison with no chance of ever getting out. Padgett ruminates on it a minute and volunteers something extraordinary:
He says he made a mistake. He never meant to send Young away forever.
"I didn't think when I gave Kenneth Young life that it was life without parole," said Padgett. "At this point, I'd sign a clemency petition for him to be considered for release." - Excerpt from For young people in prison, life sentence can mean no parole By Meg Laughlin, Tampa Bay Times Staff Writer Friday, February 27, 2009

In 2001 at age 14, Kenneth Young was arrested for aiding his mother's drug dealer in a series of armed robberies. He was told she would be killed if he didn't help settle her debts. No one was harmed during the robberies. Subsequently, Kenneth was sentenced to FOUR CONSECUTIVE LIFE SENTENCES. In 2010, the US Supreme Court did away with Life Without Parole for Juveniles in non-homicide cases. Kenneth was re-sentenced to 30 years in prison. He is currently 29 years old and won't be eligible for parole until he is in his 40's.

Please Free Kenneth Young now.