Give us a more truthful and transparent labels on food products

Give us a more truthful and transparent labels on food products

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Nath Mirandilla started this petition to Food and Drug Administration and

This movement condemns the use of misleading words to advertise food products commercially present throughout the global market. Words such as, 100% Non-GMO, All Natural…, Zero Sugar, 100% Vitamin Supplements etc. are some of the words one might encounter when shopping at their local grocery store or supermarket. The fact is, though some of these claims might appeal true, it does not necessarily mean it is healthy or safe for an individual to consume who aims to avoid certain food properties that could pose potential risks to their health.

Beginning with “100% Non-GMO,” almost no food product or fruit has not been genetically modified these past several decades. If this were to be true, almost all fruits today will not be edible by humans. The word natural has no definite meaning yet that must be followed by law if used in advertising food products. Therefore, several companies simply use it for marketing strategies targeting good health – seeking individuals. Zero Sugar can also be manipulated as only having a substitute for a sweetener. Vitamin supplements that contain 100% of said vitamins are not ideal for daily consumption as certain vitamins in the body must only be kept at a specific range. These are only some of the languages that food companies use in order to appeal to the masses. Though this kind of language might be necessary in order to promote their product, it usually means harm given that its other side of the truth pose risks for consumers. One should not be easily appealed by food advertisements as it could cause significant health risks in long term.

 On a documentary made by Damon Gameau; a 2015 film called “That Sugar Film,” its experiment featured eating foods marketed as low-fat and “healthy” in a span of 2 weeks. Only after 18 days, he developed Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease where he gained 8.5kg in his body weight and an extra 7% total body fat in the form of visceral fat. Along the foods that were eaten were cereals, yoghurt, biscuits and fruit juices. Though he did not change his calorie intake (2300cal), he packed a significant amount of fat which can be seen in his “sugar belly.” Fructose played as the major variable that caused alarming changes to his health. To provide a local context, Coke Zero is advertised as no calories, no fat, no sugar, and no carbs. However, their substitute for sugar was discovered to be aspartame which is an artificial non-saccharide sweetener 200 times sweeter than sucrose where several studies had associated it with hundreds of health problems (Arnarson, 2015). Different misleading food advertisements can be found almost everywhere that only seek to make profit out of people who subdue to it and not give them a truthful product.

In order to minimize present health hazards in our current community, this movement aims to: (a) stop misleading people on the food that they buy, (b) have more information transparency on food labels regarding its process, contents, and nutritional values, and (c) claims on food advertisements should undergo several research and studies before being marketed to the public. Subscribing to this campaign will help build a more truthful future especially in marketing products as it promotes both health safety and product legitimacy.   

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