"DISABILITY IS NOT INABILITY. AN EFFECTIVE ACTION TOWARDS MISCONCEPTION"

"DISABILITY IS NOT INABILITY. AN EFFECTIVE ACTION TOWARDS MISCONCEPTION"

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AAHELI GOSWAMI started this petition to E-Sports and

Disabled people with extraordinary talents succeed and contribute to the world economy every day.

Imagine the world of science without Stephen Hawking.

The Olympics without Tanni Grey Thompson.

And the horrendous thought of television without Stephen Fry.

Many unemployed people with health challenges and disabilities face complex barriers that they must overcome to be successful in their search for work. But for many people with disabilities, the main thing they have in common with these heroes, is a strength of character and determination to succeed.

Not everyone is a genius, but a great many people can be extraordinary and I strongly believe that with the right support, many more people with disabilities can secure work, making a valuable contribution to society and leading a fulfilling life for themselves.

As someone who works everyday to enable those who want to find work in spite of disability, I want to share a few thoughts from my experience.

The first thing is this: very few people with disabilities will have straightforward barriers to employment.

A disability, health issue or the experience of long term unemployment might, for example, have an additional impact on mental health or self-esteem. In fact, our research shows that approximately 40% of our customers suffer some sort of secondary depression. There may also be complex financial issues in coming off benefits, housing difficulties, or transport.

Addressing one barrier on its own is pointless and counterproductive if the individual is then knocked back by another.

Support therefore should be holistic.

It should seeks to simultaneously address all the factors impacting on a customer's ability to gain work.

This kind of integrated support works. I believe it should be at the heart of all future provision.

Secondly, following on from an emphasis on integrate support, employability support cannot work if it is provided in total isolation from the rest of the client's life.

Multidisciplinary case conferencing can help bring together relevant stakeholders in the customer's life. This might include: carers, community mental health practitioners, the Housing Authority, Access to Work, friends and family and, of course, their employer.

Lastly then, our own work and that of other providers shows time and time again that the more empowered a person is over their own support, the greater the likelihood of success.

One way to make an individual feel more empowered is through quality contact time with advisers who can work on confidence and identifying the primary barriers holding someone back.There is also room for deployment of digital technology to allow customers to do more for themselves between appointments. For example, though much development is still necessary, simple automated processes like "Liquid drop" allows people to be contacted specifically for job vacancies or recruitment drives relevant to them.

Effective employability support for the disabled is support that puts the customer at the heart of the service, that is truly integrated with other agencies, that creates and leaves behind a circle of support ultimately empowers the client.

It supports individuals so that regardless of their physical or mental abilities, they can go on to become extraordinary.

IF YOU ARE DISABLED, YO AREN'T DIFFERENT AT ALL. THESE ARE A FEW TIPS FOR YOU ALL -

1.Don’t try to ignore or suppress your feelings. It’s only human to want to avoid pain, but just like you won’t get over an injury by ignoring it, you can’t work through grief without allowing yourself to feel it and actively deal with it. Allow yourself to fully experience your feelings without judgement.

2.You’re likely to go through a roller coaster of emotions—from anger and sadness to disbelief. This is perfectly normal. And like a roller coaster, the experience is unpredictable and full of ups and downs. Just trust that with time, the lows will become less intense and you will begin to find your new normal.

3.You don’t have to put on a happy face. Learning to live with a disability isn’t easy. Having bad days doesn’t mean you’re not brave or strong. And pretending you’re okay when you’re not doesn’t help anyone—least of all your family and friends. Let the people you trust know how you’re really feeling. It will help both them and you.

4.You can be happy, even in a “broken” body. It may not seem like it now, but the truth is that you can build a happy, meaningful life for yourself, even if you’re never able to walk, hear, or see like you used to. It may help to search out inspiring stories of people with disabilities who are thriving and living lives they love. You can learn from others who have gone before you, and their successes can help you stay motivated during tough times.


5.Don’t dwell on what you can no longer do. Spending lots of time thinking about the things your disability has taken from you is a surefire recipe for depression. Mourn the losses, then move on. Focus on what you can do and what you hope to do in the future. This gives you something to look forward to.


6.Learn as much as possible about your disability. While obsessing over negative medical information is counterproductive, it’s important to understand what you’re facing. What’s your diagnosis? What is the typical progression or common complications? Knowing what’s going on with your body and what to expect will help you prepare yourself and adjust more quickly.

7.Be your own advocate. You are your own best advocate as you negotiate the challenges of life with a disability, including at work and in the healthcare system. Knowledge is power, so educate yourself about your rights and the resources available to you. As you take charge, you’ll also start to feel less helpless and more empowered.

8.Take advantage of the things you can do. While you may not be able to change your disability, you can reduce its impact on your daily life by seeking out and embracing whatever adaptive technologies and tools are available. If you need a device such as a prosthetic, a white cane, or a wheelchair to make your life easier, then use it. Try to let go of any embarrassment or fear of stigma. You are not defined by the aids you use.

9.Set realistic goals—and be patient. A disability forces you to learn new skills and strategies. You may also have to relearn simple things you used to take for granted. It can be a frustrating process, and it’s only natural to want to rush things and get back to functioning as quickly as possible. But it’s important to stay realistic. Setting overly aggressive goals can actually lead to setbacks and discouragement. Be patient with yourself. Every small step forward counts. Eventually, you’ll get there.

BELIEVE IN YOURSELF AND GO ON..........

 

SO LET US NOT DISCRIMINATE THE DISABLED. THEY ARE ALSO NORMAL PEOPLE LIKE US. LET US SUPPORT THEM, THEY WILL MAKE OUR COUNTRY AND THE WORLD PROUD ONE DAY.

“My advice to other disabled people would be, concentrate on things your disability doesn’t prevent you doing well, and don’t regret the things it interferes with. Don’t be disabled in spirit as well as physically.” -Stephen Hawking

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