Raise awareness for endometriosis and the side affects of the lupron Depot shot.

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I suffer from the disease along with other women. Doctors in force the lupron depot shot which caused more issues for me. Bone density loss. The list is too long to begin. I suffer from pain so bad that sometimes ordinary easy task around home are impossible. Pain, Anxiety, depression, and staying awake throughout the day are the things that keep me home. Some days I am even afraid to leave home just to grocery shop because I never know when symptoms will start up. Nausea and vomiting cause weight loss. Personality changes because of hormone imbalances have become issues. The symptoms are so severe I worry to the point I am praying to the lord above to give me peace, happiness, and I wonder if I am alone at times. I do however know that I am not the only suffer as I have family with this horrible issue. I want to help other young girls and anyone with this issue. I have had surgeries and treatments. This is considered a non curable disease. Patients with endometriosis can experience horrific pain – for the lucky ones it lasts just a couple of days during their period, and in the worst cases the pain is 24/7. The dichotomy between the way women with endometriosis look well on the outside but are experiencing excruciating pain internally can cause even well-meaning people to doubt the severity of their pain. Most women begin to have pain in their teenage years, sometimes even starting in junior high school. While similar in timing, this pain is completely different than normal menstrual cramps. It is not uncommon for these girls to miss a couple of days of school each month from cyclic pain that can exceed the level of pain patients experience after major surgery. A lack of awareness of this disease can leave these girls without a correct diagnosis and support from their physicians. This can lead to a lack of appropriate treatment for the pain and invalidation of the patient’s situation. Her family is now led to believe that psychological issues drive the severity of her pain.In this tragic situation, she is effectively held prisoner and tortured by her own body in broad daylight, with no one who fully understands her situation or who can effectively help her. The symptoms usually progress as she matures into a young woman. Both the severity and duration of the pain typically increase. Initially most days each month are pain-free, but the number of these days slowly decreases until there are a greater number of non-functioning pain days. The unpredictability of the increasing number of pain days makes it challenging to maintain a functional life. It becomes increasingly difficult to make plans for a future date as it becomes more likely that it will be a pain day and she will not be able to follow through on her commitment for the activity. As a disease, endometriosis can take away many additional aspects of a normal life. Mothers cannot reliably meet the needs of their children when the pain is too severe to function. Wives try to push through the pain to be intimate with their husbands, but eventually the pain becomes too intense to continue. Grinding fatigue as severe as that experienced with advanced cancer is present in most cases. Bloating, moodiness, and bladder and bowel issues are common as well. Feeling like a vibrant desirable woman is long since gone. Acting like the loving compassionate woman, mother and partner that she truly is becomes more and more difficult. The stress on family relationships is common and real. “What are the common endometriosis symptoms?”
Severe pelvic pain: The pain may be cyclical (worsening around the menstrual flow and ovulation) and/or non-cyclical in nature (constant throughout the cycle). Women describe a burning, throbbing, stabbing pain in different parts of their pelvis. This pain can be even more severe than labor pains and post-operative pain.
Pain with sex: Endometriosis can cause pain with deep penetration. This is because the area of tissue just beyond the end of the vagina is commonly affected by the disease, making it exquisitely tender and sore.
Pain with urination and bladder pain: If disease is present involving or near the bladder this may result in bladder pain/sensitivity and pain on emptying the bladder. Another common cause of bladder symptoms is interstitial cystitis, a condition that frequently co-occurs with endometriosis.
Pain with bowel movements: Endometriosis involving the lowest part of the colon (the rectum) may result in pain with bowel movements during menses (or during the whole month long).
Pain prior to bowel movements: Endometriosis involving the colon may result in pain just prior to bowel movements.
Cyclical rectal bleeding: If bowel disease has invaded into the bowel wall, the patient may experience cyclical rectal bleeding.
Bloating: Bloating may result from the inflammatory response to endometriosis involving the pelvis and bowels.
Nausea and vomiting: This may be a symptom of severe pain, of the effect of inflammation on the gastrointestinal tract or more specifically could be a symptom of invasive small bowel disease. Acute vomiting can be a symptom of small bowel obstruction, a rare but serious complication of endometriosis demanding emergency medical intervention.
Constipation and diarrhea: Endometriosis near or involving the bowel may result in IBS-like symptoms.
Fatigue: Severe fatigue is a non-specific symptom of endometriosis. It is a common symptom experienced by sufferers of chronic illness and pain.
Infertility: It has been estimated that 40% of women with endometriosis struggle with fertility problems. Around 20% of women in a healthy population will experience infertility, meaning that in those with endometriosis the risk of fertility problems is doubled. Infertility may be due to adhesions that result from the disease process or from the effect of the disease on the intrauterine environment; endometriotic tissue releases chemicals that may hinder conception and implantation.
Shoulder tip pain: Less commonly, if a patient has diaphragmatic endometriosis, she may present with cyclical right shoulder tip pain. Diaphragmatic endometriosis is relatively rare.
Importantly, while endometriosis is associated with a range of symptoms the most common endometriosis symptom is chronic pelvic pain. You do not have to experience all of these symptoms to have endometriosis. If you are experiencing debilitating pelvic pain this is not normal. It is your body’s way of communicating that something is wrong and you should seek the help of a doctor who is familiar with treating endometriosis and pelvic pain.

If you are experiencing these problems, its time for you to speak up. Let me help you! May God bless all of you. Please share!



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