Do not construct the palm oil power plant that ruins tropical forests!!

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Thanks for adding your voice.

田崎 拳士郎
Jul 18, 2020
野生動物や自然を破壊するパーム油発電所は、製造停止にするべきです。

Thanks for adding your voice.

Anita Kanitz
Dec 24, 2019
"You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make." -- Jane Goodall

"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything." -- Albert Einstein

If you really think that the environment is less important than the economy, try holding your breath while you count your money." -- Guy McPherson

"We are the first generation to feel the sting of climate change, and we are the last generation that can do something about it." -- Jay Inslee

books about:

Rising-Dispatches from the New American Shore | Elizabeth Rush
In “Rising,” Elizabeth Rush takes readers to the physical and cultural edges of the country, from the marginalized and forgotten citizens of places like Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, to the glass castles of Facebook and Google in Silicon Valley. As high tide and massive storms become the new normal, those at the coasts, especially those with lower incomes, will be most at risk of flooding and all that comes with it. At stake are not just coastlines; entire communities stand to lose their homes and lifestyles to climate change, becoming the first of many climate refugees. The question is not a matter of if but when we lose these lands, and Rush explores how we cope with this knowledge.

The Ends of the World | Peter Brannen
Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions
As we stare down the barrel of our own (man-made) catastrophe, science journalist Pete Brannen takes us on a walk down memory lane over millions of years to examine the planet’s five mass extinctions. With paleontologists as our protagonists, “The Ends of the World” uses fossil records across the globe to autopsy our five mass extinctions and portend our future. While the topic might sound as dry as a fossilized trilobite, Brannen’s wit may leave you chuckling aloud, from Ordovician to Cretaceous — call it rock and droll.

Devil In The Wind: voices from the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires/Frank Prem (Autor)
Devil In The Wind is an account of catastrophic fire and its immediate aftermath.
In this 21st century, the whole world seems to be on fire. America burns. Europe burns. Greece is reeling after its own tragedy of fire.
And Australia burns, as it has always done, but now so much more fiercely. In February 2009, wildfires burnt through entire communities, taking 173 lives and injuring hundreds, while destroying thousands of houses and other buildings. Up to 400 fires destroyed 450,000 hectares of forest, native fauna and habitat, livestock and farmland.
In the aftermath of the fires, the voices of people who had lived through the experience -- victims, rescuers, and observers -- were spoken and were heard.
Devil In The Wind is Frank Prem's poetic anthology of the personal, and very human, accounts of those who themselves experienced and survived Black Saturday. Poetry writing that interacts directly with readers emotions.

How to Give Up Plastic | Will McCallum
A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time
Plastics are everyone’s problem, and unless we as individuals, governments and companies all share responsibility, we won’t solve ever solve it. In this book, Will McCallum, head of oceans at Greenpeace UK, frames the current state of global plastic pollution and the environmental consequences of our throwaway, single-use culture. Part history, part guide, “How to Give Up Plastic” helps us understand our plastics addiction while giving us practical, ambitious steps to correct it.

Storming the Wall | Todd Miller
Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security
It’s time to open our eyes to the economic and political implications of climate change. In “Storming the Wall,” Todd Miller tells the story of climate change refugees that have been forced from their homes and paints a larger picture of how wealthy countries like the United States are putting up walls, militarizing borders and bloating detention centers to restrict those seeking refuge and maintain the status quo of the haves and have nots.

The Uninhabitable Earth | David Wallace-Wells
Life After Warming
Need to get up-to-speed on our climate emergency? “The Uninhabitable Earth” may be the book for you. In 200-odd pages, columnist and editor David Wallace-Wells deftly unpacks the past, present and future of life in the time of anthropogenic global warming. Remarkably, Wallace-Wells’s prose manages to convey not only the urgency (and anxiety) of our environmental crisis, but the opportunity we still have to seize the solutions right in front of us and turn things around. First you’ll get scared straight; then you’ll get straight to work.

The Garden Jungle: or Gardening to Save the Planet/Dave Goulson (Autor)
The Garden Jungle is a wonderful introduction to the hundreds of small creatures with whom we live cheek-by-jowl and of the myriad ways that we can encourage them to thrive.
The Garden Jungle is about the wildlife that lives right under our noses, in our gardens and parks, between the gaps in the pavement, and in the soil beneath our feet. Wherever you are right now, the chances are that there are worms, woodlice, centipedes, flies, silverfish, wasps, beetles, mice, shrews and much, much more, quietly living within just a few paces of you.
Dave Goulson gives us an insight into the fascinating and sometimes weird lives of these creatures, taking us burrowing into the compost heap, digging under the lawn and diving into the garden pond. He explains how our lives and ultimately the fate of humankind are inextricably intertwined with that of earwigs, bees, lacewings and hoverflies, unappreciated heroes of the natural world.
The Garden Jungle is at times an immensely serious book, exploring the environmental harm inadvertently done by gardeners who buy intensively reared plants in disposable plastic pots, sprayed with pesticides and grown in peat cut from the ground. Goulson argues that gardens could become places where we can reconnect with nature and rediscover where food comes from. With just a few small changes, our gardens could become a vast network of tiny nature reserves, where humans and wildlife can thrive together in harmony rather than conflict.
For anyone who has a garden, and cares about our planet, this book is essential reading.

The West Without Water - What Past Floods, Droughts, and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow/ Lynn Ingram (Autor)
The West without Water documents the tumultuous climate of the American West over twenty millennia, with tales of past droughts and deluges and predictions about the impacts of future climate change on water resources. Looking at the region’s current water crisis from the perspective of its climate history, the authors ask the central question of what is normal climate for the West, and whether the relatively benign climate of the past century will continue into the future.
The West without Water merges climate and paleoclimate research from a wide variety of sources as it introduces readers to key discoveries in cracking the secrets of the regions climatic past. It demonstrates that extended droughts and catastrophic floods have plagued the West with regularity over the past two millennia and recounts the most disastrous flood in the history of California and the West, which occurred in 1861-62. The authors show that, while the West may have temporarily buffered itself from such harsh climatic swings by creating artificial environments and human landscapes, our modern civilization may be ill-prepared for the future climate changes that are predicted to beset the region. They warn that it is time to face the realities of the past and prepare for a future in which fresh water may be less reliable.

Climate Justice: A Man-Made Problem With a Feminist Solution/Mary Robinson (Autor)
SHORTLISTED FOR THE IRISH BOOK AWARDS 2018
Holding her first grandchild in her arms in 2003, Mary Robinson was struck by the uncertainty of the world he had been born into. Before his fiftieth birthday, he would share the planet with more than nine billion people - people battling for food, water, and shelter in an increasingly volatile climate. The faceless, shadowy menace of climate change had become, in an instant, deeply personal.
Mary Robinson's mission would lead her all over the world, from Malawi to Mongolia, and to a heartening revelation: that an irrepressible driving force in the battle for climate justice could be found at the grassroots level, mainly among women, many of them mothers and grandmothers like herself. From Sharon Hanshaw, the Mississippi matriarch whose campaign began in her East Biloxi hair salon and culminated in her speaking at the United Nations, to Constance Okollet, a small farmer who transformed the fortunes of her ailing community in rural Uganda, Robinson met with ordinary people whose resilience and ingenuity had already unlocked extraordinary change. Powerful and deeply humane, Climate Justice is a stirring manifesto on one of the most pressing humanitarian issues of our time, and a lucid, affirmative, and well-argued case for hope.

Losing Earth | Nathaniel Rich
A Recent History
“Losing Earth” explores the environmental decade that never was: 1979–89, when we knew all we needed to know about global warming to stop it. Tracing the political and scientific history of the climate crisis, Nathaniel Rich reports how the public, with scientific backing, lined up to tackle climate change — until a coordinated campaign by lobbyists, corporations and politicians cast doubt on the whole thing. We all know what happened next. To understand how we got to where we are, we must look to the shortcomings of our past. “Losing Earth” does just that.

Don’t Even Think About It | George Marshall
Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Why is our response to climate change so woeful? George Marshall explores how we make choices to act or ignore. And when it comes to climate change, it’s usually the latter. Climate change is a “wicked problem,” Marshall writes, a complicated challenge with no clear enemy and no silver-bullet solution. To tackle this problem and mobilize action, “Don’t Even Think About It” argues we need science, but just as importantly, we need emotional, compelling narratives.

The Year of the Flood/ Margaret Atwood
In this second book of the MaddAddam trilogy, the long-feared waterless flood has occurred, altering Earth as we know it and obliterating most human life except for a few survivors.

The Great Flood: Travels Through a Sodden Landscape/Edward Platt (Author)
Flooding has always threatened the rainy, wind-swept islands of the United Kingdom, but it is becoming more frequent and more severe. Combining travel writing and reportage with readings of history, literature and myth, Edward Platt explores the way floods have shaped the physical landscape of Britain and left their mark on its inhabitants. During the course of two years, which coincided with the record-breaking floods of the winter of 2013–14, Platt travelled around the country, visiting places that had flooded and meeting the people affected. He visited flooded villages and towns and expanses of marsh and Fen threatened by the winter storms, and travelled along the edge of the drowned plain that used to connect Britain to continental Europe. He met people struggling to stop their houses falling into the sea and others whose homes had been engulfed. He investigated disasters natural and man-made, and heard about the conflicting attitudes towards those charged with preventing them.
The Great Flood dramatizes the experience of being flooded and considers what will happen as the planet warms and the waters rise, illuminating the reality behind the statistics and headlines that we all too often ignore.

Organic Gardening: The Natural No-Dig Way/Charles Dowding (Autor)
In this book, Charles Dowding shares the wealth of his experience, explaining his approach to soil and plants and revealing the range of techniques that have enabled him to grow healthy and vibrant crops for decades. His success is based on a key principle of “no dig”—not digging. This enhances soil structure and encourages healthy growth, especially when soil life is encouraged and multiplied through the addition of good compost and manure. Based on this approach and his use of a system of permanent, slightly raised beds, Dowding shows, in this book, how to grow a delicious variety of fruit and vegetables: what to choose; when to sow, plant, and harvest; and how best to avoid pests and diseases.

Climate Leviathan/ Joel Wainwright and Geoff Mann
Drawing on a wide range of political thought, Joel Wainwright and Geoff Mann argue that rapid climate change will transform the world’s political economy and the fundamental political arrangements most people take for granted. The result will be a capitalist planetary sovereignty, a terrifying eventuality that makes the construction of viable, radical alternatives truly imperative.

No One is Too Small to Make a Difference/ Greta Thunberg
What’s It About? Well, it sort of says it on the tin with this one. Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg has become the voice and the face of a youth uprising against the climate crisis after skipping a day of school in protest in August 2018. Since then, she’s had a Nobel Peace Prize nomination. And if you’ve ever listened to her speak, you’ll know why. No One is Too Small to Make a Difference is a collection of these magnificent speeches, which have brought a new, brutally honest voice to the world. There are few who can inspire change and individual actions quite like Greta Thunberg.
A Quote From The Author: “You say you love your children above all else. And yet you are stealing their future in front of their very eyes. Until you start focusing on what needs to be done rather than what is politically possible there’s no hope. We can not solve a crisis without treating it as a crisis.” – Greta Thunberg speaking to the U.N. plenary in Katowice, Poland on 12 December 2018.
A Quote From The Book: “Homo Sapiens have not yet failed. Yes, we are failing, but there is still time to turn everything around. We can still fix this. We still have everything in our own hands.” – No One is Too Small to Make a Difference, Greta Thunberg (2019).

Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? | Frans de Waal
People have long assumed that complex thought and emotion were exclusive to humanity. Primatologist and ethologist Frans de Waal challenges this assumption, outlining the evolution of human understanding of animal cognition and exploring case studies of animal problem solving, tool use and social structures. This book is a source of provocative research findings, a history and critique of the field and a personal narrative of de Waal’s own career evolution. The result drives readers to reevaluate what it means to be intelligent while deepening their appreciation for the unique and diverse talents across the animal kingdom.

Salvage the Bones | Jesmyn Ward
Facts and figures may drive policy, but they rarely stir emotion with the strength that pure human storytelling can do. “Salvage the Bones” is the one interesting work of fiction on this list, but author Jesmyn Ward comes from a place of enormous truth to tell the story of the Batiste family — bolstered by community, defined by pride and threatened by extreme heat and the battering of ever-stronger hurricanes. Like the book’s protagonist, 15-year-old Esch, Ward grew up on the Mississippi Gulf Coast and lived through Hurricane Katrina, a category-5 hurricane that pummeled communities already made vulnerable by wetland degradation, local land subsistence and flooding. Ward’s prose rises above the cut-and-dried news coverage of the time to tell the story with a dignity and intensity that demonstrates all that we can create together and all that we stand to lose by climate change.

Where the Water Goes | David Owen
Life and Death Along the Colorado River
The Colorado River provides water for nearly 40 million people, but with climate change and booming populations, this river’s tap is close to running dry. David Owen takes us on a journey down this prized waterway, from the snowmelt atop the Rocky Mountains to the dried-up deserts of Mexico. After nearly a century of division by lawyers and politicians, overuse by farmers and cities and redirection by engineers and bureaucrats, the Colorado River’s resilience is waning. We’ve created this mess, but we can also pull ourselves out of it, Owen argues, before the tap runs completely dry.

This Radical Land | Daegan Miller
A Natural History of Dissent
When most still believed the natural world was a limitless resource for the taking, early environmentalists saw an ideal in which humans could coexist with the natural world, rather than exploiting it. Through a series of essays, Daegan Miller highlights efforts to bring together ideals of environmental justice, conservation and sustainable development at a time in history when American progress was viewed through the lens of unhindered extraction and expansion. This journey into the earliest beginnings of environmentalism is a reminder that radical, innovative ideas have always been a part of the effort to live in harmony with our planet.

Merchants of Doubt | Naomi Oreskes, Erik M. Conway
In “Merchants of Doubt,” Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway draw a direct line between the tobacco industry’s initial response to secondhand smoke and our contemporary way of thinking about science, specifically global warming. As the books explains, a few industry-backed scientists led a coordinated campaign to cast doubt on science: Cherry-picking facts, misrepresenting views and celebrating unregulated capitalism as inherently American. It’s a common theme in our history and one that is still playing out today: Thanks to a few very powerful people, facts have been misconstrued and the public misguided in favor of unregulated, corporate-friendly ventures. Meanwhile, global warming has accelerated and so, too, has our own doubt about it.

The Death and Life of the Great Lakes | Dan Egan
Since their settlement in the 1800s, the Great Lakes have undergone a destructive transformation by pollution and invasive species, the latter a byproduct of various engineering feats throughout the 20th century. Egan traces the roots and progress of these environmental challenges, as well as the hazardous social, economic and political problems they’ve caused. What’s at stake is the largest body of freshwater in the world, a precious environmental resource home to diverse ecosystems and depended upon by hundreds of thousands. It’s our job to protect it.

From the Ashes of Eden: The moment the fire started, through to the escape from the flames / Rachel Ireland (Autor)
A first hand account of a mother's journey through Pinery Bushfire in South Australia. From the moment the fire started, through the escape from the flames, discovery of the complete loss of the family home and the struggle and fight to re-build it all.

books about for kids and teens:

Going Blue: A Teen Guide to Saving Our Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, & Wetlands/ M. A. Kaye, Cathryn Berger (Autor), Philippe Cousteau (Künstler), EarthEcho International (Künstler)
Written by service learning expert Cathryn Berger Kaye and celebrity ocean spokesperson Philippe Cousteau, Going Blue educates young people about the earths water crisis and gives them tools and inspiration to transform their ideas into action. With lively photos and practical suggestions, the book helps teens plan and do a meaningful service project that benefits our planets water system. Along the way, readers learn about issues such as clean water access, coral reef damage, runoff pollution, trash islands, factory fishing, bottled water, and much more. This combination of academic learning and community service is at the heart of the fast-growing teaching strategy known as service learning.
Going Blue is divided into the five stages of service learning: investigation, preparation, action, reflection, and demonstration. Special sections include a history of ocean exploration with a profile of Jacques Cousteau; an interview with Philippe Cousteau; stories of young people around the world addressing water issues; book and Web resources; and an afterword for adults.

Protect The Pollinators /Rachael Rose Zoller (Autor)
Protect The Pollinators is a vibrant and whimsically illustrated children's book introducing seven of the Earths pollinators and their importance. This storybook also shares about where chocolate comes from and introduces a furry surprise pollinator at the end! There is also inspiration and pollinator friendly resources included at the end of the book. This book would make a wonderful gift for budding naturalists and gardeners.

Dry/Neal Shusterman (Autor), Jarrod Shusterman (Autor)
When the California drought escalates to catastrophic proportions, one teen is forced to make life and death decisions for her family in this harrowing story of survival from New York Times bestselling author Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman.
The drought—or the Tap-Out, as everyone calls it—has been going on for a while now. Everyone’s lives have become an endless list of don’ts: don’t water the lawn, don’t fill up your pool, don’t take long showers. Until the taps run dry. Suddenly, Alyssa’s quiet suburban street spirals into a warzone of desperation; neighbors and families turned against each other on the hunt for water. And when her parents don’t return and her life—and the life of her brother—is threatened, Alyssa has to make impossible choices if she’s going to survive.

Our House Is on Fire: Greta Thunberg's Call to Save the Planet /Jeanette Winter (Autor, Illustrator)
From acclaimed picture book creator Jeanette Winter comes the urgent and powerful story of Greta Thunberg, the sixteen-year-old climate activist who has sparked a worldwide student movement and is demanding action from world leaders who refuse to address climate change.
"I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic…I want you to act as if our house is on fire. Because it is." (Greta)
When she was fifteen years old, Greta Thunberg’s teacher explained to her class that our climate is changing—the earth is getting warmer, the polar ice caps are melting, and life on earth is threatened. Greta was devastated. What could she do? If the grown-ups weren’t doing enough to save the planet, Greta would have to demand change herself.
So she went on strike, skipping school every Friday to sit outside of the Swedish Parliament building with a sign that read “School Strike for Climate.” At first, Greta was the only one. But gradually, more and more students joined her, until her lone protest had sparked a worldwide student movement for action on climate change.
Now, a year later, Greta is speaking to audiences of world leaders at important meetings like the United Nations Climate Conference and the World Economic Forum. She is leading the conversation on climate change and sparking worldwide conversation on how to save our planet. Greta is showing everyone that even the smallest person can make a big difference, and this picture book informs and inspires young readers who are beginning to learn about the world around them.

The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk/ Jan Thornhill
Great Auks were flightless birds that resembled penguins. They were prolific in the icy waters of the northern Atlantic until human hunters, egg collectors, and climate change led to their extinction. Unfortunately, many other bird species are on a similar path. “The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk” is a beautifully designed picture book that reminds us how precious life is – all life. Booklist says, “This vivid, fascinating story emphasizes not only the importance of conservation but also how deeply intertwined the human and animal worlds can be. Eye-opening and tragic, to be sure, but surprisingly hopeful all the same.”

The Problem of the Hot World/ Pam Bonsper
The trees have stopped growing. The grass is all gone. The world is too hot, and there’s no more water to drink. When the forest world is turned upside down, how will the animals survive? Five friends – a fox, a bear, an owl, a mole, and a deer – set out on a journey to find where the water has gone. Can they bring it back? “The book has a lovely forest setting with recognizable animals, very interesting and charming illustrations (in perfect synergy with the story), and tells the story of environmental changes in a very simple, friendly, serene way,” says one Amazon reviewer.

It’s Your World/ Chelsea Clinton
“The New York Times” bestselling book of empowerment for kids, written by Chelsea Clinton, includes an important message on the environment. With facts, charts, photographs, and stories, readers walk away with a deeper understanding of our earth and how to act to protect it. “Taking an upbeat, positive approach, former First Daughter Clinton stresses the importance of being proactive and involved when it comes to current events. She includes many examples of children and teens who have made a difference, and each chapter ends with a list of concrete actions readers can take,” says School Library Journal.

Global Warming/ Seymour Simon
Global warming may be an outdated term, but this book from award-winning science writer Seymour Simon is still highly relevant. The vibrant full-page, full-color photographs provide an up-close introduction concerning the facts surrounding climate change.

It’s Getting Hot in Here/ Bridget Heos
Author Bridget Heos tackles climate change head-on in this informative book written for a teen audience. Heos explains the history and science behind what’s causing our planet to warm and details the way humans have played a dominant role in its acceleration. Publisher’s Weekly says, “Well-researched and comprehensible, ‘It’s Getting Hot in Here’ is an alarming, but never alarmist, examination of a critical topic.”

The New 50 Simple Things Kids Can Do to Save the Earth/ EarthWorks Group and Sophie Javna
Published in advance of the celebration of Earth Day in 1990, the original 50 Things Kids Can Do to Save the Earth was a cultural phenomenon, selling more than 5 million copies and inspiring an entire generation of environmental warriors. Now the book is back in print and updated for the 21st century with both original content and brand-new easy-to-do and kid-friendly projects to make a difference in our world. The new edition contains tons of tips and facts about the state of the planet sure to inform and engage young readers excited to start saving the earth.

Empty /Suzanne Weyn (Autor)
A dystopic look at what happens to one American town when all the fossil fuels run out...
It's the near future - the very near future - and the fossil fuels are running out. No gas. No oil. Which means no driving. No heat. Supermarkets are empty. Malls have shut down. Life has just become more local than we ever knew it could be.
Nobody expected the end to come this fast. And in the small town of Spring Valley, decisions that once seemed easy are quickly becoming matters of life and death. There is hope - there has to be hope - just there are also sacrifices that need to be made, and a whole society that needs to be rethought.

Eyes Wide Open/ Paul Fleischman
Meant for older readers, “Eyes Wide Open” is a call to action that instructs teens and young adults on how they can evaluate the issues surrounding our environment using a combination of media, politics, and history. This guide is a must-read for young minds seeking to make a difference.

Dark Water Rising by Marian Hale (Autor)
Galveston, Texas, may be the booming city of the brand-new twentieth century, but to Seth, it is the end of a dream. He longs to be a carpenter like his father, but his family has moved to Galveston so he can go to a good school. Still, the last few weeks of summer might not be so bad. Seth has a real job as a builder and the beach is within walking distance. Things seem to be looking up, until a storm warning is raised one sweltering afternoon. No one could have imagined anything like this. Giant walls of water crash in from the sea. Shingles and bricks are deadly missiles flying through the air. People not hit by flying debris are swept away by rushing water. Forget the future, Seth and his family will be lucky to survive the next twenty-four hours.
Dark Water Rising is a 2007 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Saint Louis Armstrong Beach/Brenda Woods (Autor)
A boy, a dog, and New Orleans' most famous storm—Hurricane Katrina.
Saint is a boy with confidence as big as his name is long. A budding musician, he earns money playing clarinet for the New Orleans tourists, and his best friend is a stray dog named Shadow. At first Saint is sure that Hurricane Katrina will be just like the last one--no big deal. But then the city is ordered to evacuate and Saint refuses to leave without Shadow. Saint and Shadow flee to his neighbor's attic--and soon enough it's up to Saint to save them all.
"Woods takes us right into New Orleans, right into the eye of the storm and the heart of New Orleans' people." — Jacqueline Woodson, National Book Award-winnng author of Brown Girl Dreaming
"Provides a vivid description of what life was like in pre-Katrina New Orleans, and how quickly peoples' lives were shattered. The characters are well-developed, and readers truly will care about their fates." — Library Media Connection, starred review
"A small gem that sparkles with hope, resilience and the Crescent City's unique, jazz-infused spirit." — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

The Water Princess /Susan Verde (Autor), Georgie Badiel (Autor), Peter H. Reynolds (Illustrator)
Based on supermodel Georgie Badiel’s childhood, a young girl dreams of bringing clean drinking water to her African village
With its wide sky and warm earth, Princess Gie Gie’s kingdom is a beautiful land. But clean drinking water is scarce in her small African village. And try as she might, Gie Gie cannot bring the water closer; she cannot make it run clearer. Every morning, she rises before the sun to make the long journey to the well. Instead of a crown, she wears a heavy pot on her head to collect the water. After the voyage home, after boiling the water to drink and clean with, Gie Gie thinks of the trip that tomorrow will bring. And she dreams. She dreams of a day when her village will have cool, crystal-clear water of its own.
Inspired by the childhood of African–born model Georgie Badiel, acclaimed author Susan Verde and award-winning author/illustrator Peter H. Reynolds have come together to tell this moving story. As a child in Burkina Faso, Georgie and the other girls in her village had to walk for miles each day to collect water. This vibrant, engaging picture book sheds light on this struggle that continues all over the world today, instilling hope for a future when all children will have access to clean drinking water.

There's a Rang-Tan in My Bedroom/James Sellick (Author),Frann Preston-Gannon (Illustrator)
A stunning picture book about one little girl and her orangutan friend, based on the Greenpeace film that became a viral sensation. When a little girl discovers a mischievous orangutan on the loose in her bedroom, she can't understand why it keeps shouting OOO! at her shampoo and her chocolate. But when Rang-tan explains that there are humans running wild in her rainforest, burning down trees so they can grow palm oil to put in products, the little girl knows what she has to do: help save the orangutans!
Published in collaboration with Greenpeace, featuring a foreword from Dame Emma Thompson and brought to life by award-winning illustrator Frann Preston-Gannon, this is a very special picture book with a vital message to share.
Extra pages at the back include information about orangutans and palm oil plus exciting ideas about how young readers can make a difference.

Breathe/Sarah Crossan
The world has no air. If you want to survive, you pay to breathe. But what if you can’t? And what if you think everything could be different? Three teens will leave everything they know behind in Sarah Crossan’s gripping and original dystopian teen novel of danger, longing, and glimmering hope.

The Carbon Diaries 2015 /Saci Lloyd
“It’s January 1st, 2015, and the UK is the first nation to introduce carbon dioxide rationing in a drastic bid to combat climate change. As her family spirals out of control, Laura Brown chronicles the first year of rationing with scathing abandon.

Solarpunk: Ecological and Fantastical Stories in a Sustainable World/ Gerson Lodi-Ribeiro, Fábio Fernandes (Translator)
Imagine a sustainable world, run on clean and renewable energies that are less aggressive to the environment. Now imagine humanity under the impact of these changes. This is the premise Brazilian editor Gerson Lodi-Ribeiro proposed, and these authors took the challenge to envision hopeful futures and alternate histories. The stories in this anthology explore terrorism against green corporations, large space ships propelled by the pressure of solar radiation, the advent of photosynthetic humans, and how different society might be if we had switched to renewable energies much earlier in history. Originally published in Brazil and translated for the first time from the Portuguese by Fábio Fernandes, this anthology of optimistic science fiction features nine authors from Brazil and Portugal including Carlos Orsi, Telmo Marçal, Romeu Martins, Antonio Luiz M. Costa, Gabriel Cantareira, Daniel I. Dutra, André S. Silva, Roberta Spindler, and Gerson Lodi-Ribeiro.”

Memory of Water/ Emmi Itäranta
Global warming has changed the world’s geography and its politics. Wars are waged over water, and China rules Europe, including the Scandinavian Union, which is occupied by the power state of New Qian. In this far north place, seventeen-year-old Noria Kaitio is learning to become a tea master like her father, a position that holds great responsibility and great secrets. Tea masters alone know the location of hidden water sources, including the natural spring that Noria’s father tends, which once provided water for her whole village.

Books Featuring Endangered, Threatened, or Extinct Animals:

Hope for Animals and Their World: How Endangered Species Are Being Rescued from the Brink/ Jane Goodall,Thane Maynard, Gail Hudson
From world-renowned scientist Jane Goodall, as seen in the new National Geographic documentary Jane, comes an inspiring message about the future of the animal kingdom.
With the insatiable curiosity and conversational prose that have made her a bestselling author, Goodall - along with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard - shares fascinating survival stories about the American Crocodile, the California Condor, the Black-Footed Ferret, and more; all formerly endangered species and species once on the verge of extinction whose populations are now being regenerated.
Interweaving her own first-hand experiences in the field with the compelling research of premier scientists, Goodall illuminates the heroic efforts of dedicated environmentalists and the truly critical need to protect the habitats of these beloved species. At once a celebration of the animal kingdom and a passionate call to arms, HOPE FOR ANIMALS THEIR WORLD presents an uplifting, hopeful message for the future of animal-human coexistence.

The End of the Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat/ Charles Clover
Gourmands and health-conscious consumers alike have fallen for fish; last year per capita consumption in the United States hit an all-time high. Packed with nutrients and naturally low in fat, fish is the last animal we can still eat in good conscience. Or can we?
In this vivid, eye-opening book—first published in the UK to wide acclaim and now extensively revised for an American audience—environmental journalist Charles Clover argues that our passion for fish is unsustainable. Seventy-five percent of the world’s fish stocks are now fully exploited or overfished; the most popular varieties risk extinction within the next few decades.
Clover trawls the globe for answers, from Tokyo’s sumptuous fish market to the heart of New England’s fishing industry. He joins hardy sailors on high-tech boats, interviews top chefs whose menu selections can influence the fate of entire species, and examines the ineffective organizations charged with regulating the world’s fisheries. Along the way he argues that governments as well as consumers can take steps to reverse this disturbing trend before it’s too late. The price of a mouthwatering fillet of Chilean sea bass may seem outrageous, but The End of the Line shows its real cost to the ecosystem is far greater.

Endangered Animals: A Reference Guide to Conflicting Issues
/ Richard P. Reading, Brian Miller
Our planet is losing its diversity of life at a rate unparalleled in recent times (see Wilson 1988). As human population and needs (real or perceived) expand, the globe becomes scarred by a deadly scythe. The habitats we increasingly harvest, such as tropical forests and wetlands, are often the crucibles of biotic richness. Is this loss simply fate? Are Homo sapiens following some specific manifest destiny? Should people just accept the trend and go about their daily business? After all, don’t people simply represent one species on the planet, all of which are struggling for survival?
Many adopt that attitude. It is certainly the easy path. After all, no matter how apocalyptic the outcome, the process is so slow (at least on human time scales) that it is nearly imperceptible. Also, each generation of increasingly urbanized populations throughout the world moves farther from nature. A few people may notice that the howl of a wolf no longer floats over the hills or that the springtime song of their favorite prairie bird rings less frequently than in their youth. But by and large, many lost life forms are too distant and obscure to be missed, and in thousands to millions of cases the forms may be gone before they are even known to science.
Yet there is a myriad of people who find this trend unacceptable. The stories of some of those people are encapsulated in this book. Issues that surround the dramatic declines of species are complex, often conflict-laden, and not easy to reverse. However, one can learn from past practices, improve performance, and avoid the problems common to endangered species conservation. To that end, this volume provides 49 case studies of subspecies, species, or groups of species that have been pushed to the brink of extinction. The contributing authors have dedicated an incredible amount of time and effort toward preserving the organisms about which they write, and they describe the controversies and complexities of each struggle. They do not want to be part of a modern extinction spasm, in which a large number of species go extinct in a relatively short period of time.

Endangered Animals: Discover Why Some of the World's Creatures Are Dying Out and What We Can Do to Protect Them/ Ben Hoare (Author)
Eyewitness: Endangered Animals takes a look at creatures around the world that are currently threatened with extinction, along with the ways that we can help them survive. Starting with an overview of biodiversity and the web of life, the book then examines the threats facing a wide range of species, including polar bears, sea turtles, tree frogs, river dolphins, jaguars, pandas, gibbons, and the California condor.

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Jenny Masters
1 year ago
The use of palm oil leads to further destruction of tropical forests. Please don’t do this...

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Rebecca McIntosh
1 year ago
I want to protect rainforest and stop climate change- trees reduce carbon in the atmosphere. Rainforest supports a huge amount of biodiversity and amazing species like oran utan will go extinct if we lose more rainforest.

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Helen Masters
1 year ago
この考えほんとにバカだよ。

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Brian Doherty
1 year ago
To build a palm oil power supply Station is mindless irresponsible and ludicrous! There are much healthier and greener options.

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Jan Ebenholtz
1 year ago
Build nuclear plants instead!

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Michael Lockyer
1 year ago
It’s self destruction

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Anne KEREVEUR
1 year ago
apes are our close cousins, we must protect them

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Chris Summerville
1 year ago
The demand for palm oil is destroying vital habitat for thousands of species. Stop this destruction NOW!!