Petitioning Daily Mail Editor

Report on women for their achievements, not their partners or what they wear


The Daily Mail covered Amal Alamuddin’s attendance at the End Sexual Violence Summit by first describing her as George Clooney's fiancée, going on to say how she is planning her wedding to him (not even their wedding) and then saying how stylish she looked in her red dress and shoes. It went on to state how her attendance allowed her to show of ‘her slim pins’, as if that was her primary reason for attending rather than the vitally important issue itself. 

The media constantly report on women based on who they are married to, what they are wearing and how good they look in it, and whether they appear slim or overweight.

Women deserve better – Demand the Daily Mail report on women for who they are and what they achieve rather than whose partner they are or what they are wearing. They’re obviously feeling the heat already - the article has been changed since it first went on line to get rid of the reference to her 'floral heels' and ‘pins’ and note that the event is a ‘serious occasion’.

 

Letter to
Daily Mail Editor
Please report on women for their achievements, not who they are married to or what they wear.

Thursday's Daily Mail reported on Amal Alamuddin’s attendance at the End Sexual Violence Summit by first describing her as George Clooney's fiancée, going on to say how she is planning her wedding to him (not even their wedding) and then saying how stylish she looked in her red dress and shoes. It went on to state how her attendance allowed her to show of ‘her slim pins’, as if that was her primary reason for attending rather than the vitally important issue itself.

No matter that she is an international human rights lawyer, instead she is defined in terms of who she is engaged to. And rather than dwell on the the subject she was there to listen to, focussing on the fact that it might have distracted her from ‘a wedding to George Clooney’ and some comments about how she was seen ‘taking notes’, as if this would be beyond a ‘raven haired beauty’.

Given its massive readership and international online reach, the Daily Mail could have a real impact in changing a culture that values and judges women more for who they are on the arm of or what they are wearing, than for who they are or what they have achieved. Please act to ensure your paper reports on women as they deserve in the future,