Petition Closed
Petitioning The College Board

College Board: Stop placing the March Sunday test date after the clock change

For years, now, the College Board has been scheduling the March test date on the weekend of the spring season clock change. This allows Saturday test takers to take the test as usual, while Sunday testers lose an hour of sleep the night before the test. Often, these testers cannot simply go to sleep earlier, as they are busy attending evening prayers as per their religious guidelines.

These Sunday testers do not have the option of testing on Saturday due to their religion. Now, the College Board has decided to penalize these test takers for their religious practices. In America, the home of religious freedom for all and a bastion of tolerance, this practice cannot stand.

Studies have shown repeatedly the importance of sleep, especially immediately preceeding a test of the length and importance of the SAT. This sleep, which College Board is denying students, is essential to students' testing performance.


Forcing Sunday test-takers to lose an hour of sleep before the test is inherently biased against those whose religious beliefs prohibit Saturday testing. This practice is discriminatory and must end. Now.

Letter to
The College Board
Multiple times, now, the SAT's Sunday test date in March has been placed the day after the spring Daylight Savings Time shift. This shift costs students an hour of sleep; however, not all students are affected equally. Only those whose religious beliefs preclude Saturday testing are caused to lose an hour of sleep before the test on Sunday. This practice is inherently discriminatory, as it steals an hour of sleep - the importance of which has been proven time and time again by multiple studies - from students on the basis of their religion.

Such a discriminatory practice must end. We request respectfully that in the future, the Sunday test date in March take place either a week before or a week after the clock change, and that affected students have their scores adjusted to compensate for the sleep deprivation you have caused.