Restore Boston's history; Restore the Liberty Tree

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On August 14th 1765, American colonists in the city of Boston gathered at a large elm tree, at the corner of what are now Washington and Essex Streets, where they protested the infamous Stamp Act.

After meeting at this tree on many occasions, it eventually became known as "The Liberty Tree" amongst the residents of Massachusetts, and the Sons of Liberty throughout the 13 colonies. The designation of a tree where the rebels would meet became so popular that each colony chose a tree in their most populous town to do the same.

As the site of the first public act of defiance against the Crown, the location of the Liberty Tree remained significant from 1765 all the way through the American Revolution, and into modern times. After a group of loyalists cut down the tree in opposition to the rebel forces, the tree's significance did not die, and was therefore referred to as the "Liberty Stump." 

The Liberty Tree stood to represent the intolerance for monarchy and the lack of self-governance. The tenacity of our founding fathers deserves to be represented in our modern society, by the tree that started it all.

Today, all that marks the location of the Liberty Tree is a plaque two stories above the spot (and above a Dunkin Donuts) and marker on the sidewalk.

City of Boston: your fellow countrymen ask you to restore the legacy of the Liberty Tree, and install a more appropriate and respectful memorial



Today: Gabriela is counting on you

Gabriela Amore needs your help with “City of Boston Parks and Recreation: Restore Boston's history; Restore the Liberty Tree”. Join Gabriela and 195 supporters today.