Condemn CPS's Remote Learning Grading Policy

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Edit: If you want to fight this, after you sign the petition, complain directly to Janice Jackson at 773-553-1573 or CEO-Jackson@cps.edu or the Illinois State Board of Education at COVID19@isbe.net!

We are a group of Lane Tech students calling for the revocation of Chicago Public Schools' COVID-19 grading policy. This policy, overall, has the potential to hurt students’ academic standing, and was clearly not designed with students’ best interests in mind. We demand a revocation of this policy and an adoption of one that cannot, under any circumstances, including the below-named (which are not comprehensive), negatively impact a student.

It is in plain violation of the Illinois State Board of Education’s “no failing or unsatisfactory grades” mandate. Under CPS’s guidelines, if a high school student (1) does not participate in remote learning or (2) does not earn a passing grade despite completing all assignments, they are issued an “incomplete,” meaning they must engage in credit recovery, most likely meaning retaking the class or attending summer school.

It holds students to pre-pandemic standards of academic success despite the changed circumstances. For a student to retain their 3rd quarter A, they must continue to perform exceedingly well on their assignments and assessments, earning at least that grade, despite not having the support and instruction they normally would when in class.

It holds students to different levels of academic success based on their pre-closure grades, resulting in grades that inaccurately reflect a student’s effort. Under the guidelines, if a student with a 69 raises their grade to a 70, they are awarded a C and their GPA will presumably benefit. If the grade of another student with a 3rd quarter 90 falls to an 89, they are given a “pass” — the latter student earns a higher grade than the former, but the latter’s GPA does not improve.

It does not allow students without access to technology to raise their GPAs. Even if a student without Internet access completes their bi-weekly packets and masters the class’s material, they can only be awarded a “pass,” resulting in no positive impact on their GPA, despite their work.