Petitioning Chef Gordon Ramsey

Chef Gordon Ramsey: We Ask That You Bring Awareness To Factory Farming

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Supporters

ALSO LETTER TO CHEF GORDON RAMSEY IS BELOW IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO VIEW IT. Thank you 

The factory farming industry strives to maximize output while minimizing costs—always at the animals' expense. The giant corporations that run most factory farms have found that they can make more money by cramming animals into tiny spaces, even though many of the animals get sick and some die.

On today's factory farms, animals are crammed by the thousands into filthy, windowless sheds and confined to wire cages, gestation crates, barren dirt lots, and other cruel confinement systems. These animals will never raise their families, root around in the soil, build nests, or do anything that is natural and important to them. Most won't even feel the sun on their backs or breathe fresh air until the day they are loaded onto trucks bound for slaughter. The green pastures and idyllic barnyard scenes of years past are now distant memories.

Dairy cows, at average, don't live longer than four and a half years. In ideal circumstances they can reach the age of thirty, but their production level diminishes from the age of about six. During their lives they have a calf every year, because this is the only way to start the production of milk.

10% of the cows have to stay in the stable their entire life, to obtain a higher production level. If farmers will not be legally obliged to keep the animals on the meadow for a part of the year, by the year 2015 (as expected), 75% of all cows in the Netherlands will be kept inside.

The calf is taken away immediately or after a week at the most, to prevent bonding between mother and child. They are kept in hutches. These are the white, domed, igloo-like structures that some farmers use as outdoor "nurseries". The hutch keeps the young calves isolated from other calves. In their first eight weeks the calves have a strong tendency to suck. When they are not allowed to drink at their mother they would suck at the body parts of other calves.

These animals are treated with such neglect and brutality as you can see directly from this video links:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYTkM1OHFQg&oref=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DgYTkM1OHFQg&has_verified=1

Pigs have to be kept in the dark for nearly 24 hours to keep them calm. As from 2002 pig breeders will be compelled to keep pigs on two thirds of solid floor. One third of a pig's floor is made of grid, to let the manure fall through. For this reason they are in the smell of ammonia all day long. The animals stand on the grid floor all day, which cause them to suffer from foot injuries. Because they live almost permanent in half or complete darkness (to keep them calm) in very small cages, they are not used to anything and they panic when they have to be transported to the slaughterhouse (usually after 3 to 6 months). This is all the worse during long distance exportation. When they have youngsters, sows are jammed between two rails, so that they cannot turn around and take care of the piglets, only feed them. This is done to prevent the sow from crushing a piglet to death, because of the lack of space. The piglets are brought to the weaning section after the nursing period of 3 to 4 weeks (instead of the natural 14 weeks). At the age of about 72 days they go to the fattening farm, where 14 of them are put in a sty of 10 m², usually on a grid floor without straw.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=IvTlB8L2CDk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=jBR4FlrWVk4

 

 

Letter to
Chef Gordon Ramsey
Dear Mr. Chef Ramsey,

I have learned of your visit to Imperial, Taiwan with your experience of the Shark Fin Industry and the torture involved in this. I know you are appalled with this just as I am. I ask that you open your eyes to the neglect and torture involved with other animals as well. Specifically the factory farmed animals. I will give you a description of their daily lives.

The factory farming industry strives to maximize output while minimizing costs—always at the animals' expense. The giant corporations that run most factory farms have found that they can make more money by cramming animals into tiny spaces, even though many of the animals get sick and some die.

On today's factory farms, animals are crammed by the thousands into filthy, windowless sheds and confined to wire cages, gestation crates, barren dirt lots, and other cruel confinement systems. These animals will never raise their families, root around in the soil, build nests, or do anything that is natural and important to them. Most won't even feel the sun on their backs or breathe fresh air until the day they are loaded onto trucks bound for slaughter. The green pastures and idyllic barnyard scenes of years past are now distant memories.

Dairy cows, at average, don't live longer than four and a half years. In ideal circumstances they can reach the age of thirty, but their production level diminishes from the age of about six. During their lives they have a calf every year, because this is the only way to start the production of milk.

10% of the cows have to stay in the stable their entire life, to obtain a higher production level. If farmers will not be legally obliged to keep the animals on the meadow for a part of the year, by the year 2015 (as expected), 75% of all cows in the Netherlands will be kept inside.
The calf is taken away immediately or after a week at the most, to prevent bonding between mother and child. They are kept in hutches. These are the white, domed, igloo-like structures that some farmers use as outdoor "nurseries". The hutch keeps the young calves isolated from other calves. In their first eight weeks the calves have a strong tendency to suck. When they are not allowed to drink at their mother they would suck at the body parts of other calves.

These animals are treated with such neglect and brutality as you can see directly from this video links:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYTkM1OHFQg&oref=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DgYTkM1OHFQg&has_verified=1

Pigs have to be kept in the dark for nearly 24 hours to keep them calm. As from 2002 pig breeders will be compelled to keep pigs on two thirds of solid floor. One third of a pig's floor is made of grid, to let the manure fall through. For this reason they are in the smell of ammonia all day long. The animals stand on the grid floor all day, which cause them to suffer from foot injuries. Because they live almost permanent in half or complete darkness (to keep them calm) in very small cages, they are not used to anything and they panic when they have to be transported to the slaughterhouse (usually after 3 to 6 months). This is all the worse during long distance exportation.

When they have youngsters, sows are jammed between two rails, so that they cannot turn around and take care of the piglets, only feed them. This is done to prevent the sow from crushing a piglet to death, because of the lack of space. The piglets are brought to the weaning section after the nursing period of 3 to 4 weeks (instead of the natural 14 weeks). At the age of about 72 days they go to the fattening farm, where 14 of them are put in a sty of 10 m², usually on a grid floor without straw.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=IvTlB8L2CDk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=jBR4FlrWVk4

I hope you will decide to bring awareness about this given you've seen the horrific facts above. I believe you will definitely grow a larger caring crowd. Thank you for your time and attention.