Leniency, lesser penalty due to pandemic.

Leniency, lesser penalty due to pandemic.

0 have signed. Let’s get to 500!
At 500 signatures, this petition is more likely to be featured in recommendations!
Franklin Pollard started this petition to Governor Brian Kemp and

I am an inmate in a Federal Prison. I was convicted for armed bank robbery in the year 2008 and sentenced to serve 180 months in the Bureau of Prisons. During the first eight years of my sentence I was designated to prisons on the West Coast. I am from Augusta, Georgia and my entire life, family to include my mother, siblings, and children is there. I was 25 years of age when I began this journey and am now 37, in this time I have grown a great deal not only intellectually but mentally as well. I am writing this of sound mind with the hopes of attaining empathetic consideration to my plight and many others that are being affected by the COVID pandemic in ways that may not be considered as of now.
My name is Drew Pollard. In December of 2007, the 20th to be exact, I along with three others robbed a Federal Credit Union. I was apprehended on June 13, 2008. By no means do I intend to portray myself as an angel prior, during, nor after this time. I accepted my responsibility for my actions then and I still do today. I do regret that my actions affected so many others, not only my loved ones but also the people I put in harms way. I do not see me serving this sentence alone as me paying my debt to society and I will strive to be a productive asset and a positive example to my country and community after my release.
My 15-year sentence began at Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) Englewood in Littleton, Colorado. After 2 years, I was then transferred to FCI Safford in Safford Arizona, where I also served 3 years, after which I was transferred to Lompoc California. Only after that was, I allowed to be transferred to my region, which is in the South.
I am from Augusta Georgia and I have lived there my entire life. I have two teenage daughters that I am very close with and have maintained constant communication with through this entire ordeal. My entire bloodline is rooted in Augusta and it will forever be my home. My family visited me frequently during pre-trial while I was housed in Jefferson County Jail, in Jefferson County Georgia but after I was sentenced and shipped across the country it presented a very difficult obstacle and many factors, mainly financial insufficiency, contributed to my family being unable to make the trip to visit. We did; however, stay connected through phone calls, letters, and after corrlinks was installed emails. My daughters were 4 and 5 when I got locked up. When I finally landed in a prison where my family could afford to visit, they were 13 and 14. But since then I have received visits at least twice a month from my family.
I was 25 at the time I got locked up. From then to now, I have lost both my maternal and paternal grandmothers, my paternal grandfather, and my father. As well as two great aunts that I was very close with and one first cousin. In the midst of all this heart break, I still managed to receive my GED and become a GED tutor which I did for five years and obtained countless certificates including cabinet making and worked 2400 hours toward my apprenticeship to become a carpenter. I facilitated a number of adult self-help classes including Anger Management, Self-Esteem, and 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Not only did I assist in helping others, but I learned more and more with every class I taught. Today I can honestly look in the mirror and see a very different man than the one that came into the system in 2008.
My story is not that unique. There are many in my situation, some just starting and some who have been in longer than I that experience similar hardships and still strive for perseverance. My situation became more stressing in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak. Not only was I left to deal with the fear of not only my own life but my family’s as well. My uncle passed away during the pandemic and it made me fear that there was nowhere anyone could run. The fact that my family was even more worried about me in here made me feel more and more hopeless as each day passed. All visitation was cancelled indefinitely, and we are all fearful that we may not see each other again. Some institutions have video access through Corrlinks where inmates can video chat the people on their visitation list. However, where I am does not. I took a drastic measure and purchased a cell phone so I could stay in constant communication and not only see my loved ones, especially my daughters, but also show them my face with the hope of easing their worries as well. During this time my oldest daughter, who graduated from high school this year, modeled her cap and gown for me during a video chat. This honestly was the best moment that I’ve experienced in nearly 13 years. Shortly after that I was caught with the phone and locked in the SHU (Special Housing Unit) or “hole”. As of August 27th, I have been in the SHU for 2 months. I was due to be released from prison on October 27th of this year. Now I am facing charges from the FBI that can potentially add up to a year on this sentence and can still be sanctioned by the institution in which they will add 41 more days. Yes, I own the fact that I broke the rules. Period. No excuses. All I ask is that this minor infraction be seen as just that and I be shown leniency for the first time by the hands of justice in a show that not only is the hand there to uphold but also to uplift. The government has been allowing inmates to go home and be with their families through the Cares Act, but I don’t qualify being that I’m locked up for a violent crime. Had I been granted that; I would not have to seek other measures to connect with my loved ones during these trying times.
Please sign this petition to support my plight. I’m not asking that the infraction be dismissed, but that I be granted immediate release and allowed to serve whatever time the Court rules on house arrest or in a half way house.

0 have signed. Let’s get to 500!
At 500 signatures, this petition is more likely to be featured in recommendations!