Queenscliffe: the time to act on the climate emergency is NOW

Reasons for signing

See why other supporters are signing, why this petition is important to them, and share your reason for signing (this will mean a lot to the starter of the petition).

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Paul Beard
1 year ago
Literally there is no future if we don’t especially for our children

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Annie Norrish
1 year ago
We have to act immediately. There is clearly a climate crisis and if we do not act now it is too late.

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Rhys Jones
1 year ago
Wake up Australia !
(We) voted for Trump wannabees. They take their cues from his style of deceitful propaganda .
They'll retire with a million dollar handshake after destroying our social/environmental structures and putting average folk deeper into economic slavery . They want to americanise us . Take a look at America . Do you really want to be like that ?! I'm not too smart but I could see this coming a mile off. Conservative governments are the end of civilisation as we know it . They call it a "dog eat dog " . Who wants that ? What government in its right mind would oppose having solar on every roof ? You'd have to wonder just who is moving the chips around the gambling table . Whose tune is the government dancing to ? Certainly not the human factor , and certainly no foresight whatsoever regarding continued healthy life on Planet Earth.....which is LIFE itself ,there is NO PLANET "B".... and not many politicians seem to understand this fundamental principal . Blind , greedy Egos are running the show . It's obvious .

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Jordan Pregelj
1 year ago
I did a Masters Thesis on Queenscliffe Coastal Town. Happy to help.

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Anita Kanitz
1 year ago
"You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make." -- Jane Goodall

"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything." -- Albert Einstein

If you really think that the environment is less important than the economy, try holding your breath while you count your money." -- Guy McPherson

"We are the first generation to feel the sting of climate change, and we are the last generation that can do something about it." -- Jay Inslee

books about:

The Selfish Ape: Human Nature and Our Path to Extinction/ Nicholas P. Money
Weaving together stories of science and sociology, The Selfish Ape offers a refreshing response to common fantasies about the ascent of humanity. Rather than imagining modern humans as a species with godlike powers, or Homo deus, Nicholas P. Money recasts us as Homo narcissus—paragons of self-absorption. This exhilarating story offers an immense sweep of modern biology, leading readers from earth’s unexceptional location in the cosmos to the story of our microbial origins and the innerworkings of the human body. It explores human genetics, reproduction, brain function, and aging, creating an enlightened view of man as a brilliantly inventive, yet self-destructive animal.
The Selfish Ape is a book about human biology, the intertwined characteristics of our greatness and failure, and the way that we have plundered the biosphere. Written in a highly accessible style, it is a perfect read for those interested in science, human history, sociology, and the environment.

Quarry Vision: Coal, Climate Change and the End of the Resources Boom / Guy Pearse
This is an essay about “quarry vision”, the mindset that sees Australia’s greatest asset as its mineral and energy resources – coal especially. How has this distorted our national politics and our response to climate change? What happens now that our coal-fired resources boom has gone bust?
In this powerful essay about the national interest, Guy Pearse discusses the future of the coal industry and argues with the economic orthodoxy. He exposes the shadowy world of greenhouse lobbyists; how they think, operate and skin cats. Quarry vision, he argues, is a carbon-laced trap and a blind faith and a mentality we can no longer afford.

Overpopulation, Earth's Destruction, And The Fix.: (Climate Change is Only a Symptom and not the Problem and learn the whole story/ Fred Graham-Yooll (Autor)
Forget the political niceties for we have so little time left for the "Real World Fix', plus the fact that 'Climate Change or Global Warming' is only one of the symptoms and not the probem. Any Doctor will tell you that while you can ease a symptom, you can't make a cure until you identify and fix the problem! Politics and political correctness has no place here for what we are talking about is death in it's many horrific forms with our so called species of 'Homo Sapiens' the cause; so let's get with it everyone with a tale of the truth and an unvarnished assessment of what we have to do.

Flood Country: When a Drought Hits, The Water Wars Begin!/ Robert Maddison (Autor)
Water theft, corruption, intrigue… at the height of a ten-year drought in Australia's outback.
Jack Miller, former Sydney Morning Herald journalist, follows his instincts to rural Dawson to do a follow-up piece on a headline that read 'Angry farmer accuses bureaucrat of corruption'.
Little did he know what he was about to unleash as he set about helping the feisty old cattle farmer to expose corruption in the water industry—blatant water theft at the height of a ten-year drought crippling the Australian farming landscape.
As Jack and his friends slowly unravel the web of deceit and corruption, which extends through the bureaucracy and into the corridors of political power and big business, they are confronted by an increasingly desperate enemy willing to do anything to stay above the law.

Rising-Dispatches from the New American Shore | Elizabeth Rush
In “Rising,” Elizabeth Rush takes readers to the physical and cultural edges of the country, from the marginalized and forgotten citizens of places like Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, to the glass castles of Facebook and Google in Silicon Valley. As high tide and massive storms become the new normal, those at the coasts, especially those with lower incomes, will be most at risk of flooding and all that comes with it. At stake are not just coastlines; entire communities stand to lose their homes and lifestyles to climate change, becoming the first of many climate refugees. The question is not a matter of if but when we lose these lands, and Rush explores how we cope with this knowledge.

Gender and the environment-
Why Women Will Save the Planet/Friends of the Earth
This provocative collection gathers essays and interviews from the leading lights of the international environmental and feminist movements to mount a powerful case that gender equality is essential to environmental progress. In Why Women Will Save the Planet, Ecofeminists contributors like Vandana Shiva, Caroline Lucas, and Maria Mies lay out the ways in which women’s issues intersect with environmental issues, and they detail concrete steps that organizations and campaigners big and small can take to ensure that they are pursuing these goals in tandem. A rallying cry designed to unify – and thus strengthen – two crucial movements in the global fight for social justice, this book will spur action and, crucially, collaboration.

Gender and Climate Change: Impacts, Science, Policy/Joane Nagel
This timely and provocative book uses a gender lens to see what has been overlooked in popular discussion, research, and policy debates concerning climate change. We see that more women than men die in climate-related natural disasters; the history of science and war are intimately interwoven masculine occupations and preoccupations; and conservative men and their interests drive the climate change denial machine. We also see that climate policymakers who embrace big science approaches and solutions to climate change are predominantly male with an economic agenda that marginalizes the interests of women and developing economies. With vivid case studies, this book highlights the differential, gendered impacts of climate changes.

Infertile Ground: Population Control and Women’s Rights in an Era of Climate Change/Jade S. Sasse
Since the turn of the millennium, American media, scientists, and environmental activists have insisted that the global population crisis is “back” – that the only way to avoid catastrophic climate change is to ensure women’s universal access to contraception. What is bringing the population problem back – and why now? In On Infertile Ground, Jade S. Sasser explores how a network of development actors, including private donors, NGO managers, scientists, and youth advocates, is bringing population back to the center of public environmental debate. While these narratives never disappeared, Sasser argues, histories of human rights abuses, racism, and a conservative backlash against abortion in the 1980s drove them underground – until now.

The Right to Be Cold: One Woman’s Fight to Protect the Arctic and Save the Planet from Climate Change/Sheila Watt-Cloutier
The Right to Be Cold is the human story of life on the front lines of climate change, told by a woman who rose from humble beginnings to become one of the most influential Indigenous environmental, cultural, and human rights advocates in the world. Raised by a single mother and grandmother in the small community of Kuujjuaq, Quebec, Watt-Cloutier describes life in the traditional ice-based hunting culture of an Inuit community and reveals how Indigenous life, human rights, and the threat of climate change are inextricably linked. The Right to Be Cold is at once the intimate coming-of-age story of a remarkable woman and a stirring account of an activist’s powerful efforts to safeguard Inuit culture, the Arctic, and the planet.

Armed Conflict, Women and Climate Change/ Jody M. Prescott
Little research has been conducted on the compounding effects that armed conflict and climate change might have on at-risk population groups such as women and girls. Armed Conflict, Women and Climate Change explores the intersection of these three areas and shows how military organizations across the world need to be sensitive to these relationships to be more effective in civilian-centric operations of humanitarian relief, peacekeeping and even armed conflict. This book examines strategy and military doctrine from NATO, the UK, U.S. and Australia, and explores key issues such as displacement, food and energy insecurity, and male out-migration as well as current efforts to incorporate gender considerations in military activities and operations.

The Ends of the World | Peter Brannen
Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions
As we stare down the barrel of our own (man-made) catastrophe, science journalist Pete Brannen takes us on a walk down memory lane over millions of years to examine the planet’s five mass extinctions. With paleontologists as our protagonists, “The Ends of the World” uses fossil records across the globe to autopsy our five mass extinctions and portend our future. While the topic might sound as dry as a fossilized trilobite, Brannen’s wit may leave you chuckling aloud, from Ordovician to Cretaceous — call it rock and droll.

How to Give Up Plastic | Will McCallum
A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time
Plastics are everyone’s problem, and unless we as individuals, governments and companies all share responsibility, we won’t solve ever solve it. In this book, Will McCallum, head of oceans at Greenpeace UK, frames the current state of global plastic pollution and the environmental consequences of our throwaway, single-use culture. Part history, part guide, “How to Give Up Plastic” helps us understand our plastics addiction while giving us practical, ambitious steps to correct it.

Storming the Wall | Todd Miller
Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security
It’s time to open our eyes to the economic and political implications of climate change. In “Storming the Wall,” Todd Miller tells the story of climate change refugees that have been forced from their homes and paints a larger picture of how wealthy countries like the United States are putting up walls, militarizing borders and bloating detention centers to restrict those seeking refuge and maintain the status quo of the haves and have nots.

The Secret Lives of Glaciers/ M. Jackson
The Secret Lives of Glaciers explores just what happens when a community’s glaciers slowly disappear. Meticulously detailed, each chapter unfolds complex stories of people and glaciers along the southeastern coast of Iceland, exploring the history of glacier science and the world’s first glacier monitoring program, the power glaciers enact on local society, perceptions by some in the community that glaciers are alive, and the conflicting and intertwined consequences of rapid glacier change on the cultural fabric of the region. Powerfully written, The Secret Lives of Glaciers reaches beyond Iceland and touches on changing glaciers worldwide, revealing oft-overlooked interactions between people and ice throughout human history.

The Uninhabitable Earth | David Wallace-Wells
Life After Warming
Need to get up-to-speed on our climate emergency? “The Uninhabitable Earth” may be the book for you. In 200-odd pages, columnist and editor David Wallace-Wells deftly unpacks the past, present and future of life in the time of anthropogenic global warming. Remarkably, Wallace-Wells’s prose manages to convey not only the urgency (and anxiety) of our environmental crisis, but the opportunity we still have to seize the solutions right in front of us and turn things around. First you’ll get scared straight; then you’ll get straight to work.

Learning to Die: Wisdom in the Age of Climate Crisis/ Robert Bringhurst (Autor), Jan Zwicky (Autor)
In this powerful little book, two leading intellectuals illuminate the truth about where our environmental crisis is taking us. Writing from an island on Canadas Northwest coast, Robert Bringhurst and Jan Zwicky weigh in on the death of the planet versus the death of the individual. For Zwicky, awareness and humility are the foundation of the equanimity with which Socrates faced his death: he makes a good model when facing the death of the planet, as well as facing our own mortality. Bringhurst urges readers to tune their minds to the wild. The wild has healed the world before, and it is the only thing that stands any chance of healing the world now though it is unlikely to save Homo sapiens in the process.

Superman's Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can Do About It/
Erin Brockovich (Autor)
From environmental activist, consumer advocate, renowned crusader, champion fighter--maverick, whose courageous case against Pacific Gas and Electric was dramatized in the Oscar-winning film--a book to inspire change that looks at our present situation with water and reveals the imminent threats to our most precious, essential element, and shows us how we can each take action to make changes in our cities, our towns, our villages, before it is too late.
In Erin Brockovich's long-awaited book--her first to reckon with conditions on our planet--she makes clear why we are in the trouble we're in, and how, in large and practical ways, we each can take actions to bring about change.
She shows us what's at stake, and writes of the fraudulent science that disguises these issues, cancer clusters not being reported. She writes of the saga of PG&E that continues to this day, and of the communities and people she has worked with who have helped to make an impact. She writes of the water operator in Poughkeepsie, New York, who responded to his customers' concerns and changed his system to create some of the safest water in the country; ofthe moms in Hannibal, Missouri, who became the first citizens in the nation to file an ordinance prohibiting the use of ammonia in their public drinking water; and about how we can protect our right to clean water by fighting for better enforcement of the laws, for new legislation and better regulations. She cannot fight all battles for all people and gives us the tools to take actions ourselves, and have our voices be heard and know that steps are being taken to make sure our water is safe to drink and use.

Losing Earth | Nathaniel Rich
A Recent History
“Losing Earth” explores the environmental decade that never was: 1979–89, when we knew all we needed to know about global warming to stop it. Tracing the political and scientific history of the climate crisis, Nathaniel Rich reports how the public, with scientific backing, lined up to tackle climate change — until a coordinated campaign by lobbyists, corporations and politicians cast doubt on the whole thing. We all know what happened next. To understand how we got to where we are, we must look to the shortcomings of our past. “Losing Earth” does just that.

Don’t Even Think About It | George Marshall
Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Why is our response to climate change so woeful? George Marshall explores how we make choices to act or ignore. And when it comes to climate change, it’s usually the latter. Climate change is a “wicked problem,” Marshall writes, a complicated challenge with no clear enemy and no silver-bullet solution. To tackle this problem and mobilize action, “Don’t Even Think About It” argues we need science, but just as importantly, we need emotional, compelling narratives.

Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? | Frans de Waal
People have long assumed that complex thought and emotion were exclusive to humanity. Primatologist and ethologist Frans de Waal challenges this assumption, outlining the evolution of human understanding of animal cognition and exploring case studies of animal problem solving, tool use and social structures. This book is a source of provocative research findings, a history and critique of the field and a personal narrative of de Waal’s own career evolution. The result drives readers to reevaluate what it means to be intelligent while deepening their appreciation for the unique and diverse talents across the animal kingdom.

Salvage the Bones | Jesmyn Ward
Facts and figures may drive policy, but they rarely stir emotion with the strength that pure human storytelling can do. “Salvage the Bones” is the one work of fiction on this list, but author Jesmyn Ward comes from a place of enormous truth to tell the story of the Batiste family — bolstered by community, defined by pride and threatened by extreme heat and the battering of ever-stronger hurricanes. Like the book’s protagonist, 15-year-old Esch, Ward grew up on the Mississippi Gulf Coast and lived through Hurricane Katrina, a category-5 hurricane that pummeled communities already made vulnerable by wetland degradation, local land subsistence and flooding. Ward’s prose rises above the cut-and-dried news coverage of the time to tell the story with a dignity and intensity that demonstrates all that we can create together and all that we stand to lose by climate change.

Where the Water Goes | David Owen
Life and Death Along the Colorado River
The Colorado River provides water for nearly 40 million people, but with climate change and booming populations, this river’s tap is close to running dry. David Owen takes us on a journey down this prized waterway, from the snowmelt atop the Rocky Mountains to the dried-up deserts of Mexico. After nearly a century of division by lawyers and politicians, overuse by farmers and cities and redirection by engineers and bureaucrats, the Colorado River’s resilience is waning. We’ve created this mess, but we can also pull ourselves out of it, Owen argues, before the tap runs completely dry.

This Radical Land | Daegan Miller
A Natural History of Dissent
When most still believed the natural world was a limitless resource for the taking, early environmentalists saw an ideal in which humans could coexist with the natural world, rather than exploiting it. Through a series of essays, Daegan Miller highlights efforts to bring together ideals of environmental justice, conservation and sustainable development at a time in history when American progress was viewed through the lens of unhindered extraction and expansion. This journey into the earliest beginnings of environmentalism is a reminder that radical, innovative ideas have always been a part of the effort to live in harmony with our planet.

Merchants of Doubt | Naomi Oreskes, Erik M. Conway
In “Merchants of Doubt,” Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway draw a direct line between the tobacco industry’s initial response to secondhand smoke and our contemporary way of thinking about science, specifically global warming. As the books explains, a few industry-backed scientists led a coordinated campaign to cast doubt on science: Cherry-picking facts, misrepresenting views and celebrating unregulated capitalism as inherently American. It’s a common theme in our history and one that is still playing out today: Thanks to a few very powerful people, facts have been misconstrued and the public misguided in favor of unregulated, corporate-friendly ventures. Meanwhile, global warming has accelerated and so, too, has our own doubt about it.

The Death and Life of the Great Lakes | Dan Egan
Since their settlement in the 1800s, the Great Lakes have undergone a destructive transformation by pollution and invasive species, the latter a byproduct of various engineering feats throughout the 20th century. Egan traces the roots and progress of these environmental challenges, as well as the hazardous social, economic and political problems they’ve caused. What’s at stake is the largest body of freshwater in the world, a precious environmental resource home to diverse ecosystems and depended upon by hundreds of thousands. It’s our job to protect it.

Save The Planet: An Amazonian Tribal Leader Fights for His People, The Rainforest, and The Earth/ Almir Narayamoga Surui (Autor), Corine Sombrun (Autor), Julia Grawemeyer (Übersetzer)
Almir Sarayamoga Suruí, the Amazonian tribal chieftain of the indigenous Suruí people, is a leader in the fight to save the rainforest not only for the preservation of his land and people, but for the Earth’s and humanity’s survival as well. Joining forces with such high-tech corporations as Apple and Google Earth, Suruí has become a guardian of his people and a global activist, despite death threats and million dollar bounties on his head. A recipient of the Global Citizen Award in 2012, Suruí has calculated the direct cost of the loss of our rainforests—"the lungs of the Earth”—in terms of the total amount of Co2 that their destruction would release into the atmosphere, and the monetary loss that this would entail, and by using this carbon deficit formula, has leased access to pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies who have joined him in the stewardship of these endangered lands, their flora, fauna, and people.

The Burning Season: The Murder of Chico Mendes and the Fight for the Amazon Rain Forest/ Andrew C. Revkin (Autor)
"An admirable work...compelling." "A clear, informative account of the clash in the dark heart of the rain forest." -NEW YORK TIMES
"In the rain forests of the western Amazon," writes author Andrew Revkin, "the threat of violent death hangs in the air like mist after a tropical rain. It is simply a part of the ecosystem, just like the scorpions and snakes cached in the leafy canopy that floats over the forest floor like a seamless green circus tent."
Violent death came to Chico Mendes in the Amazon rain forest on December 22, 1988. A labor and environmental activist, Mendes was gunned down by powerful ranchers for organizing resistance to the wholesale burning of the forest. He was a target because he had convinced the government to take back land ranchers had stolen at gunpoint or through graft and then to transform it into "extractive reserves," set aside for the sustainable production of rubber, nuts, and other goods harvested from the living forest.
This was not just a local land battle on a remote frontier. Mendes had invented a kind of reverse globalization, creating alliances between his grassroots campaign and the global environmental movement. Some 500 similar killings had gone unprosecuted, but this case would be different. Under international pressure, for the first time Brazilian officials were forced to seek, capture, and try not only an Amazon gunman but the person who ordered the killing.
In this reissue of the environmental classic The Burning Season, with a new introduction by the author, Andrew Revkin artfully interweaves the moving story of Mendes's struggle with the broader natural and human history of the world's largest tropical rain forest. "It became clear," writes Revkin, acclaimed science reporter for The New York Times, "that the murder was a microcosm of the larger crime: the unbridled destruction of the last great reservoir of biological diversity on Earth." In his life and untimely death, Mendes forever altered the course of development in the Amazon, and he has since become a model for environmental campaigners everywhere.

Gardening for Birds, Butterflies, and Bees: Everything you need to Know to Create a wildlife Habitat in your Backyard/ Editors at Birds and Blooms Magazine (Creator)
Whether you’re installing a new garden bed or trying to attract orioles for the first time, it helps to start with the right information. And here it is! In this book, experts and readers from North America's #1 Bird and Garden Magazine, Birds & Blooms, give their tried-and-true advice.
Attracting birds and butterflies has never been simpler—plus you’ll get the latest tips and advice for supporting the dwindling bee population, which experts say is essential for the future of gardening. Inside this book, you’ll find irresistible plants for birds, butterflies, and bees, creative garden designs for year-round beauty, and our top plant lists to take the guesswork out of gardening.
Birds, butterflies and bees rely on plants, trees and shrubs to survive and thrive. That’s why doing your part for the environment by establishing critter-friendly areas in your own backyard is so crucial.
This book, brought to you by the editors of Birds & Blooms magazine, can serve as your guide to attracting new visitors to your landscape. Birds & Blooms has helped lead the trend we like to call “gardening with a purpose” for over 20 years. We’ve always recognized the importance of going beyond just the beauty of a garden, and purposefully choosing flowers, trees and shrubs specifically for their environmental benefits.
Birds count on healthy trees and plants as natural food sources and nesting sites. Butterflies need nectar-rich blooms for nourishment. Very specific host plants are key to caterpillar survival. And as bee populations decline, flowers that provide nectar and pollen are more essential than ever. Each of these creatures requires natural shelter as well, which trees and shrubs readily provide.
All of the 250+ featured plants are not only gorgeous and colorful, but they offer a lot of environmental benefits, too. We made sure to include amazing photos of every plant we’re recommending, so you’ll be able to see what each plant looks like and immediately know if it’s a good fit for your garden.

books about for kids and teens:

Going Blue: A Teen Guide to Saving Our Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, Wetlands / Cathryn Berger Kaye, Philippe Cousteau, EarthEcho International
Written by service learning expert Cathryn Berger Kaye and celebrity ocean spokesperson Philippe Cousteau, Going Blue educates young people about the earth’s water crisis and gives them tools and inspiration to transform their ideas into action. With lively photos and practical suggestions, the book helps teens plan and do a meaningful service project that benefits our planet’s water system. Along the way, readers learn about issues such as clean water access, coral reef damage, runoff pollution, trash islands, factory fishing, bottled water, and much more. This combination of academic learning and community service is at the heart of the fast-growing teaching strategy known as service learning.


The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk
/ Jan Thornhill
Great Auks were flightless birds that resembled penguins. They were prolific in the icy waters of the northern Atlantic until human hunters, egg collectors, and climate change led to their extinction. Unfortunately, many other bird species are on a similar path. “The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk” is a beautifully designed picture book that reminds us how precious life is – all life. Booklist says, “This vivid, fascinating story emphasizes not only the importance of conservation but also how deeply intertwined the human and animal worlds can be. Eye-opening and tragic, to be sure, but surprisingly hopeful all the same.”

No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference/ Greta Thunberg (Autor)
The history-making, ground-breaking speeches of Greta Thunberg, the young activist who has become the voice of a generation
'Everything needs to change. And it has to start today' (Greta)
In August 2018 a fifteen-year-old Swedish girl, Greta Thunberg, decided not to go to school one day. Her actions ended up sparking a global movement for action against the climate crisis, inspiring millions of pupils to go on strike for our planet, forcing governments to listen, and earning her a Nobel Peace Prize nomination.
This book brings you Greta in her own words, for the first time. Collecting her speeches that have made history across Europe, from the UN to mass street protests, No One Is Too Small to Make A Difference is a rallying cry for why we must all wake up and fight to protect the living planet, no matter how powerless we feel. Our future depends upon it.

The Problem of the Hot World
/ Pam Bonsper
The trees have stopped growing. The grass is all gone. The world is too hot, and there’s no more water to drink. When the forest world is turned upside down, how will the animals survive? Five friends – a fox, a bear, an owl, a mole, and a deer – set out on a journey to find where the water has gone. Can they bring it back? “The book has a lovely forest setting with recognizable animals, very interesting and charming illustrations (in perfect synergy with the story), and tells the story of environmental changes in a very simple, friendly, serene way,” says one Amazon reviewer.

Dry /Neal Shusterman (Autor), Jarrod Shusterman (Autor)
When the California drought escalates to catastrophic proportions, one teen is forced to make life and death decisions for her family in this harrowing story of survival from New York Times bestselling author Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman.
The drought—or the Tap-Out, as everyone calls it—has been going on for a while now. Everyone’s lives have become an endless list of don’ts: don’t water the lawn, don’t fill up your pool, don’t take long showers.
Until the taps run dry.
Suddenly, Alyssa’s quiet suburban street spirals into a warzone of desperation; neighbors and families turned against each other on the hunt for water. And when her parents don’t return and her life—and the life of her brother—is threatened, Alyssa has to make impossible choices if she’s going to survive.

Greta: The girl that changed the world - the illustrated book/ Thor Anderson (Autor)
Greta Tintin Eleonora Ernman Thunberg is the name of the girl who changes the world. The "School Strikes for the Climate" she initiated has grown into the global movement "Fridays for Future" (FFF). She was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. This colorful illustrated book documents and describes the most important stages of her life.

It’s Your World
/ Chelsea Clinton
“The New York Times” bestselling book of empowerment for kids, written by Chelsea Clinton, includes an important message on the environment. With facts, charts, photographs, and stories, readers walk away with a deeper understanding of our earth and how to act to protect it. “Taking an upbeat, positive approach, former First Daughter Clinton stresses the importance of being proactive and involved when it comes to current events. She includes many examples of children and teens who have made a difference, and each chapter ends with a list of concrete actions readers can take,” says School Library Journal.

A Dolphin's Wish: How You Can Help Make a Difference and Save Our Oceans / Trevor McCurdie (Autor), Cinzia Battistel (Illustrator)
Dive under the sea with a family of dolphins and discover the dangers of plastic pollution.
Every year, huge amounts of plastic end up in our oceans. Luckily, there's something we can do to change that! Follow along as Daddy Dolphin and his son show readers what we're doing wrong, then be inspired to take action and make a difference!
Featuring charming rhymes, bold illustrations, and educational back matter, this beautiful ocean tale offers readers a peek into life under the sea and is perfect for anyone who cares about our planet.

Global Warming
/ Seymour Simon
Global warming may be an outdated term, but this book from award-winning science writer Seymour Simon is still highly relevant. The vibrant full-page, full-color photographs provide an up-close introduction concerning the facts surrounding climate change.

It’s Getting Hot in Here
/ Bridget Heos
Author Bridget Heos tackles climate change head-on in this informative book written for a teen audience. Heos explains the history and science behind what’s causing our planet to warm and details the way humans have played a dominant role in its acceleration. Publisher’s Weekly says, “Well-researched and comprehensible, ‘It’s Getting Hot in Here’ is an alarming, but never alarmist, examination of a critical topic.”

Eyes Wide Open
/ Paul Fleischman
Meant for older readers, “Eyes Wide Open” is a call to action that instructs teens and young adults on how they can evaluate the issues surrounding our environment using a combination of media, politics, and history. This guide is a must-read for young minds seeking to make a difference.

The Water Princess/Susan Verde (Autor),, Georgie Badiel (Autor), Peter H. Reynolds (Illustrator)
With its wide sky and warm earth, Princess Gie Gie’s kingdom is a beautiful land. But clean drinking water is scarce in her small African village. And try as she might, Gie Gie cannot bring the water closer; she cannot make it run clearer. Every morning, she rises before the sun to make the long journey to the well. Instead of a crown, she wears a heavy pot on her head to collect the water. After the voyage home, after boiling the water to drink and clean with, Gie Gie thinks of the trip that tomorrow will bring. And she dreams. She dreams of a day when her village will have cool, crystal-clear water of its own.
Inspired by the childhood of African–born model Georgie Badiel, acclaimed author Susan Verde and award-winning author/illustrator Peter H. Reynolds have come together to tell this moving story. As a child in Burkina Faso, Georgie and the other girls in her village had to walk for miles each day to collect water. This vibrant, engaging picture book sheds light on this struggle that continues all over the world today, instilling hope for a future when all children will have access to clean drinking water.

Dark Days/Kate Ormand (Autor)
In a dark future world, a teenager fights to save herself and her neighbors from a government that wants to destroy them all . . .
Humankind’s careless treatment of the planet has finally resulted in the death of nearly every living creature on Earth. The people who remain have been herded together into identical living “sectors” surrounded by impenetrable steel, and they’re forbidden to leave. Life is grim, but it goes on . . . until the new order decides to start the world over again.
Sixteen-year-old Sia knows she has only fifteen days left to live. She’s seen what has happened in other sectors. First the government removes the elite few whom it has chosen to inhabit their new society. Then a cyborg army is sent in to annihilate the rest of the population. And Sia’s sector is next.
Her father has virtually vanished. Her mother goes through these last days living in a haze of cheerless acceptance. Her best friend waits foolishly for a miracle. But Sia is determined to experience some of the small things she’s missed in her short life before the giant clock in the square ticks down to zero.
Then Mace appears, a proud, dangerous boy with secrets that could change the world. And suddenly, there’s a dim light in the darkness, beckoning to Sia with the forbidden promise of rebellion . . . and hope.
Fans of Suzanne Collins, Veronica Roth, and Pittacus Lore will enjoy this “chilling and all too plausible” story of a young woman persevering in the face of danger, and a terrifying future landscape that makes the worlds of Divergent and The Maze Runner seem like Disneyland (Emma Pass, author of ACID).

Breathe / Sarah Crossan
The world has no air. If you want to survive, you pay to breathe. But what if you can't? And what if you think everything could be different? Three teens will leave everything they know behind in Sarah Crossan's gripping and original dystopian teen novel of danger, longing, and glimmering hope.
Ever since the Switch, when the oxygen levels plummeted and most of humanity died, the survivors have been protected in glass domes full of manufactured air. Protected . . . or trapped? Or controlled? Alina's a revolutionary who believes we can save the environment. Quinn's a Premium who's never had to worry about having enough air. His best friend, Bea, is an Auxiliary who's never worried about anything but having enough air. When the three cross paths, they will change everything.

My Chemical Mountain / Corina Vacco
The Outsiders meets Erin Brockovich meets Bridge to Terabithia in this high-octane drama. TIM THARP, author of The Spectacular Now, National Book Award finalist, calls My Chemical Mountain “A gritty, surprising story that confronts important personal and social issues head-on.”
Jason and his friends live for the rush of racing their dirt bikes on Chemical Mountain and swimming in orange, chunky Two Mile Creek. But they hate wealthy and powerful Mareno Chem, the company responsible for invading their territory, polluting their town, and killing Jason's father. The boys want to get even. But revenge has a price--and more than one person will pay.
Winner of the Thirtieth Annual Delacorte Press Prize for a First YA Novel
A Bankstreet Best Book of the Year
“Reminiscent of The Outsiders . . . . Dark and unflinching.” —Kirkus Reviews
“Written in the tradition of such early twentieth-century muckrakers as Upton Sinclair, Frank Norris, and Ida M. Tarbell. Angry and urgent, topical and timely."--Booklist
“From Jason’s complex teenage boy perspective, [Vacco] captures both the disheartening helplessness of the situation and the boys’ reckless resistance: ‘We cross a landfill on our way to school. We swim in creek water that smells like nail polish remover . . . We are not fools. We are brave and brilliant.’ There is power and hope in that kind of statement, and Jason’s coming-of-age tale, though dark, is full of both.” —The Horn Book Magazine
“Grim but impressive debut . . . lyrical prose and strong characters make it worth the read.” —Publishers Weekly
“A budding romance and subtle insight into Jason’s changing relationship with his friends guarantee that there’s a little something for all readers in this well-thought-out, well-executed story.” —School Library Journal
“The scenes, the attitudes, the desperation are brilliantly rendered. . . . My Chemical Mountain offers something of that punch-in-the-gut ethos of hard-boiled detectives, transferred to blue-collar youth living in a cauldron of pollution.” —The Tonawanda News
“Corina Vacco shows us real-life monsters, up close and very personal.” —ELLEN KLAGES, author of The Green Glass Sea

Save the Bees (Save the Earth/ Bethany Stahl (Autor, Illustrator)
Take a journey with a smart bee & two inquisitive children to discover the importance of pollinators! Brought to you from the author who received a Certificate of Recognition from Dr. Jane Goodall!
From exciting and adventurous to educational and captivating, Bethany Stahl's immersive stories express heartfelt messages while engaging parents and children.
With beautiful and charming illustrations, as well as a lovable bee named Clover, this is a book adults will love reading over and over again with their kids. Save the Bees has a heartwarming lesson of ways we can help our pollinators, fun activities, and a message that will stay with the reader for a lifetime.

Kids Who Are Saving the Planet (You Should Meet)/ Laurie Calkhoven (Autor), Monique Dong (Illustrator)
Meet the environmentally-minded kids who are coming up with ways to save the planet in this fascinating nonfiction Level 3 Ready-to-Read, part of a series of biographies about people “you should meet!” Have you ever wondered what you could do to help the planet? Find out how kids are helping the environment by selling lemonade to save the honeybees, starting a petition to bring attention to climate change, raising awareness through an original comic book hero, and more! Learn all about how their ideas are preserving the environment in this story of five amazing kids everyone should meet!
A special section at the back of the book includes extras such as biographies of famous young environmental activists plus interesting ideas for other ways that kids can save the environment. With the You Should Meet series, learning about amazing people has never been so much fun!

Books Featuring Endangered, Threatened, or Extinct Animals:

Hope for Animals and Their World: How Endangered Species Are Being Rescued from the Brink
/ Jane Goodall,Thane Maynard, Gail Hudson
From world-renowned scientist Jane Goodall, as seen in the new National Geographic documentary Jane, comes an inspiring message about the future of the animal kingdom.
With the insatiable curiosity and conversational prose that have made her a bestselling author, Goodall - along with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard - shares fascinating survival stories about the American Crocodile, the California Condor, the Black-Footed Ferret, and more; all formerly endangered species and species once on the verge of extinction whose populations are now being regenerated.
Interweaving her own first-hand experiences in the field with the compelling research of premier scientists, Goodall illuminates the heroic efforts of dedicated environmentalists and the truly critical need to protect the habitats of these beloved species. At once a celebration of the animal kingdom and a passionate call to arms, HOPE FOR ANIMALS THEIR WORLD presents an uplifting, hopeful message for the future of animal-human coexistence.

The End of the Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat / Charles Clover
Gourmands and health-conscious consumers alike have fallen for fish; last year per capita consumption in the United States hit an all-time high. Packed with nutrients and naturally low in fat, fish is the last animal we can still eat in good conscience. Or can we?
In this vivid, eye-opening book—first published in the UK to wide acclaim and now extensively revised for an American audience—environmental journalist Charles Clover argues that our passion for fish is unsustainable. Seventy-five percent of the world’s fish stocks are now fully exploited or overfished; the most popular varieties risk extinction within the next few decades.
Clover trawls the globe for answers, from Tokyo’s sumptuous fish market to the heart of New England’s fishing industry. He joins hardy sailors on high-tech boats, interviews top chefs whose menu selections can influence the fate of entire species, and examines the ineffective organizations charged with regulating the world’s fisheries. Along the way he argues that governments as well as consumers can take steps to reverse this disturbing trend before it’s too late. The price of a mouthwatering fillet of Chilean sea bass may seem outrageous, but The End of the Line shows its real cost to the ecosystem is far greater.

Endangered Animals: A Reference Guide to Conflicting Issues
/ Richard P. Reading, Brian Miller
Our planet is losing its diversity of life at a rate unparalleled in recent times (see Wilson 1988). As human population and needs (real or perceived) expand, the globe becomes scarred by a deadly scythe. The habitats we increasingly harvest, such as tropical forests and wetlands, are often the crucibles of biotic richness. Is this loss simply fate? Are Homo sapiens following some specific manifest destiny? Should people just accept the trend and go about their daily business? After all, don’t people simply represent one species on the planet, all of which are struggling for survival?
Many adopt that attitude. It is certainly the easy path. After all, no matter how apocalyptic the outcome, the process is so slow (at least on human time scales) that it is nearly imperceptible. Also, each generation of increasingly urbanized populations throughout the world moves farther from nature. A few people may notice that the howl of a wolf no longer floats over the hills or that the springtime song of their favorite prairie bird rings less frequently than in their youth. But by and large, many lost life forms are too distant and obscure to be missed, and in thousands to millions of cases the forms may be gone before they are even known to science.
Yet there is a myriad of people who find this trend unacceptable. The stories of some of those people are encapsulated in this book. Issues that surround the dramatic declines of species are complex, often conflict-laden, and not easy to reverse. However, one can learn from past practices, improve performance, and avoid the problems common to endangered species conservation. To that end, this volume provides 49 case studies of subspecies, species, or groups of species that have been pushed to the brink of extinction. The contributing authors have dedicated an incredible amount of time and effort toward preserving the organisms about which they write, and they describe the controversies and complexities of each struggle. They do not want to be part of a modern extinction spasm, in which a large number of species go extinct in a relatively short period of time.

Endangered Animals: Discover Why Some of the World's Creatures Are Dying Out and What We Can Do to Protect Them / Ben Hoare (Author)
Eyewitness: Endangered Animals takes a look at creatures around the world that are currently threatened with extinction, along with the ways that we can help them survive. Starting with an overview of biodiversity and the web of life, the book then examines the threats facing a wide range of species, including polar bears, sea turtles, tree frogs, river dolphins, jaguars, pandas, gibbons, and the California condor.

Thanks for adding your voice.

Pam Hopkins
1 year ago
I’m signing for my innocent sweet little grandchildren. We adults MUST act responsibly and we MUST act now on this greatest issue affecting us all

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Andrew Sutherland
1 year ago
It's simply THE most important issue which can only be addressed through people power.

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Sandra Mills
1 year ago
Everybody should act on climate change NOW.

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Britt Silvester
1 year ago
The future of our earth and children is more important than economic growth! Listen to the scientists!

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Neville Goddard
1 year ago
It's time to take individual and collective action to protect planet earth, our home. All levels of government have a role to play.