Petition Closed
Petitioning Board of Registration of Allied Health Professionals Michael Hawley

Board of Registration of Allied Health Professionals: Rule that Dry Needling is not in the scope of practice for PTs in MA

On July 26th 2012 the Board of Registration of Allied Health Professionals will vote to determine if Dry Needling for Intramuscular Therapy is within the scope of practice of Physical Therapists. Dry Needling for Intramuscular Therapy by Physical Therapists is a public safety issue.

We petition the members of the Board of Registration of Allied Health Proessionals to rule that dry needling for intramuscular therapy is not within the scope of practice for Physical Therapists in Massachusetts

Physical Therapists performing dry needling is WRONG:
● A new rule on dry needling without any professional standards would directly contradict the licensing requirements for MA acupuncturists.
● Subcutaneous insertion is not part of existing professional competencies for physical therapists in Massachusetts.
● There is no required curriculum for teaching dry needling and no validly determined minimum requirements for safe practice.
● Dry needling training is as minimal as 40 hrs to begin performing clinically compared to the 2,300+hrs didactic and 700+ clinical hrs of training it takes for acupuncturists to perform needling in a safe and effective way.

American Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (AAAOM), and the Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (CCAOM) have examined the practice of dry needling and found it to be consistent with and synonymous with the practice of acupuncture.

● The World Health Organization (WHO) defines trigger points as a subset of acupuncture points.
● Dry Needling for Intramuscular Therapy is a re-titling and re-packaging of a historically documented subset of acupuncture known as Ashi Point Needling.
● In a national survey, 82% of acupuncturists use trigger/ashi points for treating musculoskeletal pain.  Acupuncturists are well trained in all aspects of needling to provide this service safely and effectively.

Letter to
Board of Registration of Allied Health Professionals Michael Hawley
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Board of Registration of Allied Health Professionals.

----------------
Rule that Dry Needling is not in the scope of practice for PTs in MA

Dry Needling for Intramuscular Therapy is a public safety issue. On July 26th 2012 the Board of Allied Health Professionals will vote to determine if Dry Needling for Intramuscular Therapy is within the scope of practice of Physical Therapists.

Physical Therapists performing dry needling is WRONG:
● A new rule on dry needling without any professional standards would directly contradict the licensing requirements for MA acupuncturists.
● Subcutaneous insertion is not part of existing professional competencies for physical therapists in Massachusetts.
● There is no required curriculum for teaching dry needling and no validly determined minimum requirements for safe practice.
● Dry needling training is as minimal as 40 hrs to begin performing clinically compared to the 2,300+hrs didactic and 700+ clinical hrs of training it takes for acupuncturists to perform needling in a safe and effective way.


Both the AAAOM, and the CCAOM have examined the practice of dry needling and found it to be consistent with and synonymous with the practice of acupuncture.
● The World Health Organization (WHO) defines trigger points as a subset of acupuncture points.
● Dry Needling for Intramuscular Therapy is a re-titling and re-packaging (RE NAMING) of a historically documented subset of acupuncture known as Ashi Point Needling.
● In a national survey, 82% of acupuncturists use trigger/ashi points for treating musculoskeletal pain

----------------

Sincerely,