Reframing the History of Claremont Court Gate

Reframing the History of Claremont Court Gate

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Representative Berkeley History hat diese Petition an Berkeley Historical Plaque Project gestartet.

Dear Berkeley Historical Plaque Project,

Berkeley has long been a city of inclusivity and tolerance, of activism and change, of hope and impact. It has engendered the free speech movement, brought together vigorous voices against apartheid and war, welcomed refugees, and been our homes of everyday action. It has been a place for individuals to speak their truths, share their histories, and have their stories respected and valued.

Berkeley, a fabric woven by many threads, has also been a city of racial segregation, a city of structural inequality, and a city of immense wealth and painfully exhausting poverty. It has upheld redlining to restrict housing across class and race, fueled displacement through eminent domain, and underinvested in critical affordable housing.

My hope is that Berkeley can acknowledge all sides of its history, both the events that contribute to positive change in our communities' lives, and the discomforting events that have held our communities' back from opportunity, freedom, and equality. 

To make a small change to how we tell our Berkeley history, and honor all sides of our collective Berkeley history, I propose to change the information shared in the Claremont Court Gate plaque.

The Claremont Court Gate plaque could share a more representative Berkeley history if it read:

"These entry gates help define one of Berkeley’s most gracious residential areas, Claremont Court, which was designed to attract the growing number of prosperous Bay Area professionals in the early 1900s. Developer Mason-McDuffie engaged Howard, the University’s supervising architect, to design the gateway. This gate also represents the enforcement of some of the nation's first race-based zoning laws, which restricted Claremont neighborhood to white-only residents, also known commonly as redlining. The elegant red brick pillars heighten the formal ambiance of the area. Their moldings of ivory-colored terra-cotta, Ionic capitals, and clusters of acanthus leaves follow the Beaux-Arts aesthetic. The central pillar dividing the street was later removed to ease traffic as cars became popular. Additional entry gates stand on Avalon Avenue, Forest Avenue, Derby Street, and Russell Street.”

My hope is that you will join me in this opportunity to respect the complex history of Berkeley, to honor stories from backgrounds that have been suppressed far too often and for far too long.

Thank you,

Berkeley Resident

 

To read more about the current plaque and the Berkeley Hisotorical Plaque Project:

https://berkeleyplaques.org/plaque/claremont-court-gates/?cat=33

To read more about the history of race-based housing policies in Berkeley:

https://belonging.berkeley.edu/rootsraceplace

https://www.berkeleyside.com/2018/09/20/redlining-the-history-of-berkeleys-segregated-neighborhoods

https://www.eastbayexpress.com/oakland/hidden-monuments-to-racism/Content?oid=9251259

https://bookshop.org/books/the-color-of-law-a-forgotten-history-of-how-our-government-segregated-america/9781631494536 

0 haben unterschrieben. Nächstes Ziel: 100.
Bei 100 Unterschriften wird die Petition mit höherer Wahrscheinlichkeit in den Empfehlungen gelistet!