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It's time for Arizona State University to do what hundreds of other universities have done and switch to using only cage-free liquid and shell eggs in its dining services. As an ASU alumnus, I'm excited about the steps the university has already taken to become more sustainable, but it's still using eggs from hens kept in battery cages.

The vast majority of egg-laying hens in the United States are confined in battery cages. On average, each caged laying hen is afforded only 67 square inches of cage space—less space than a single sheet of letter-sized paper on which to live her entire life. Unable even to spread their wings, caged laying hens are among the most intensively confined animals in agribusiness.

Because of public opposition to battery cage confinement, many egg producers are switching to cage-free systems. These systems generally offer hens a significantly improved level of animal welfare than do battery cage systems, though the mere absence of cages sometime isn’t enough to ensure high welfare.

Unlike battery hens, cage-free hens are able to walk, spread their wings and lay their eggs in nests, vital natural behaviors denied to hens confined in cages. Most cage-free hens live in very large flocks that can consist of many thousands of hens who never go outside. The vast majority of cage-free hens live on farms that are 3rd-party audited by certification programs that mandate perching and dust-bathing areas. These advantages are very significant to the animals involved.

ASU officials told me that they plan to switch a tiny 10% of their eggs to cage-free eggs over the next three years, but for one of the largest universities in the world, every day counts in protecting animal welfare and sustainability, and 10% is hardly a change at all. Students have been asking ASU to go cage-free for years, and many other universities have made the switch much more quickly.

Please sign and share this petition to ask ASU officials to support sustainability and the humane treatment of animals today!

Letter to
Director of Dining Services Bryant Newman
Board of Regents John Huppenthal
Senior Vice President for Educational Outreach and Student Service James Rund
and 17 others
Board of Regents Bob McLendon
Board of Regents LuAnn Leonard
Board of Regents Mark Killian
Board of Regents Ernest Calderon
Board of Regents Dennis DeConcini
Board of Regents Anne Mariucci
Board of Regents Rick Myers
President and Board Member Michael Crowe
Board Member Kenneth Van Winkle
Board Member Stephan Evans
Rick Shangraw Jr
Scott Crozier
Dr. Morgan Olsen
Board Member Greg Vogel
Board of Regents Jay Heiler
Board Member John Graham
Board Member Gary Trujillo (Board Member)
It's time for Arizona State University to do what hundreds of other universities have done and switch to using only cage-free liquid and shell eggs in its dining services. I'm excited about the steps the university has already taken to become more sustainable, but it's still using eggs from hens kept in battery cages.

The vast majority of egg-laying hens in the United States are confined in battery cages. On average, each caged laying hen is afforded only 67 square inches of cage space—less space than a single sheet of letter-sized paper on which to live her entire life. Unable even to spread their wings, caged laying hens are among the most intensively confined animals in agribusiness.

Because of public opposition to battery cage confinement, many egg producers are switching to cage-free systems. These systems generally offer hens a significantly improved level of animal welfare than do battery cage systems, though the mere absence of cages sometime isn’t enough to ensure high welfare.

Unlike battery hens, cage-free hens are able to walk, spread their wings and lay their eggs in nests, vital natural behaviors denied to hens confined in cages. Most cage-free hens live in very large flocks that can consist of many thousands of hens who never go outside. The vast majority of cage-free hens live on farms that are 3rd-party audited by certification programs that mandate perching and dust-bathing areas. These advantages are very significant to the animals involved.

I understand that ASU hopes to switch a small percentage of eggs to cage-free over the next three years, but for one of the largest universities in the world, every day counts in protecting animal welfare and sustainability. Students have been asking ASU to go 100% cage-free for years, and many other universities have made the switch much more quickly.

Please support sustainability and the humane treatment of animals today!