Wildlife Emergency Services

185,128 supporters

Started 7 petitions

Victory
Petitioning Marcia Mayeda, Frank Corvino

End Wildlife Death Sentence at L​.​A. County Shelters

  On March 23rd, 2020, a seabird was found resting outside a building in Gardena. The business' employee called for help. Gardena Animal Control responded and transported the bird to the Carson Animal Shelter, run by Los Angeles County, even though it needed to be taken to aquatic bird specialists, International Bird Rescue, in San Pedro, about 10 miles south. Volunteers were ready to transport the bird.  Instead, shelter staff killed the cormorant. According to shelter representatives, they no longer transfer birds to rescue organizations. Once impounded, they are killed. Even wild mammals, like opossums, skunks, and raccoons. It seems the policy of the Los Angeles County Animal Care and Control is to kill wildlife brought to their shelters. This has to stop, now. Marcia Mayeda, we are petitioning you to make immediate changes to how your shelters respond to wildlife. - Immediately and without delay direct Dispatch to advise callers that wild animals impounded will likely be euthanized (until your policy changes) and provide callers with contact information for local wildlife rescue and rehabilitation facilities that may be able to help.  - Revise your shelters' intake protocol during Newcastle Disease quarantines to reflect the most current guidelines by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, which, currently, allows transfer of native birds and mammals to licensed wildlife rehabilitators or their representatives within the quarantine zones so long as the animal(s) have not been exposed directly to poultry or indirectly by being housed on property containing poultry. Transfer to facilities outside the quarantine zones require pre-approval. - Update your  shelters’ wildlife protocol to minimize the number of animals that are impounded and ultimately killed.   

Wildlife Emergency Services
502 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Teri Seymour, San Bernardino Animal Cruelty Prosecution Unit

Illegally snared coyote shot 14 times with pellet gun - we want justice!

Sierra Lakes Golf Club hired animal trapper-killer Lowell Miller (https://lowellswildliferemoval.com/ to kill coyotes. Lowell Miller snared a coyote by its foot in a modified trap. Leghold traps are banned from use in California except extraordinary circumstances. His action was also in violation of trapping regulation 465.5(g)(3), which requires written consent from all homeowners within 150 yards. According to reports, Lowell Miller shot the animal at least 14 times using a pellet gun. We believe cruelly killing the coyote in this way constitutes an act of animal cruelty as defined by California Penal Code 597. Video link: https://vimeo.com/397661575 More video has surfaced showing an exhausted and traumatized  coyote with its mouth tied shut by Lowell Miller. See video here: https://vimeo.com/398081662 We want: California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife to file charges against Lowell Miller for violating trapping regulations. The Humane Society San Bernardino Valley to seek animal cruelty charges against Lowell Miller. The San Bernardino District Attorney's Office to charge Lowell Miller with animal cruelty and support the filing of trapping violation charges by the California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. Rick Danruther, General Manager at Sierra Lakes Golf Club to cease trapping and to work with human-wildlife conflict experts to resolve nuisances humanely. 

Wildlife Emergency Services
3,753 supporters
Petitioning General Mills

Yoplait cups are a hazard to wild animals - they need to go!

Since 1978, when they first appeared on grocery store shelves, General Mills' Yoplait yogurt containers have been killing wildlife. Tempted by the sweet smell, animals stick their heads inside the conical-shaped containers and they get stuck.  It's not so much the "vercon" shape of the cup or the size of the opening, but the thin lip, or flange, at the top. How animals get stuck: The design of the cup allows an animal to force its head past the flexible rim, but when it tries to back out, the flange catches on the animal's hide, the back of its skull, or zygomatic arches (cheekbones).  Deprived of fresh air, unable to see, unable to eat or drink, these animals suffer tremendously before they perish, if not rescued in time. Join us in asking General Mills to get rid of the flawed cup design that is killing animals. HISTORY This is no news to General Mills. In August 1998, under pressure from animal activists, General Mills added this to the label: Protect Wildlife Crush Cup Before Disposal, placing responsibility for their hazardous packaging onto the consumer. General Mills refused, however, to make the necessary changes to the flawed design, citing: "That design is a key lure for customers, and changing it could harm sales," a spokesperson for General Mills said."  Perhaps, we can show them that sales will be harmed if they don't!   Take the pledge. 1 ) Don't purchase Yoplait yogurtor General Mills products 2 ) Ask your friends, family, and co-workers to do the same.   Want to do more? 1) LIKE us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Yoplait.Cups.Kill.Wildlife 2) Send a personal comment to General Mills, HERE. 3) Organize a demonstration, a sit-in, a parade, or a costume party in your area. 4) Video your efforts so we can post them.   This petition was inspired by a rescue of a skunk with a Yoplait container on its head. Check out our story and video, HERE.  More rescues involving animals stuck in Yoplait containers at our official web site www.noyoplait.com, HERE. Thank you in advance for supporting this call for a change! Rebecca Dmytryk, President and CEOWILDLIFE EMERGENCY SERVICESadmin(at)wildlifeservices(dot)org    

Wildlife Emergency Services
133,232 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Director Charlton Bonham

Charlton Bonham, Director, Department of Fish and Game: Consider change to mountain lion policies.

At dusk on Friday, November 30th, 2012, two sibling mountain lion cubs, between 5 and 9 months of age, were observed on the 800 block of Correas Street in Half Moon Bay, hiding just a stone's throw away from expansive open space and wild land. According to reports, wardens attempted to shoo the animals away, but, the following day, the animals was spotted again, still together, but this time in someone's backyard. It is unclear what transpired next, but both cubs were shot and killed by wardens, with public safety being cited as the main reason. Public safety must come first, and in cases involving potentially dangerous animals lethal control is understandable. However, circumstances surrounding this particular incident bring into question whether the cubs posed an imminent threat to public safety and if killing the orphans was the most appropriate answer. According to wildlife experts, the cubs were still very dependent on their mother - typically, mountain lion cubs stay with their mother for nearly two years. Their thin body condition could indicate they’d lost her - perhaps she was killed. Experts also explain the cubs’ described behavior - allowing humans to approach, as something that is not so unusual for motherless, starving, or otherwise desperate young, such as these. Because of their age, California wildlife rehabilitators believe the two cubs were excellent candidates for rehabilitation and release. They were not kittens, so there would have been no danger of imprinting. During rehabilitation, they would have received aversion training, making them less likely to ever approach humans. Unfortunately, in California, the rehabilitation of mountain lions is prohibited. This incident highlights the need for California to have at least one facility for the rehabilitation of mountain lions under certain, very specific situations - such as this. This is an appeal to the California Department of Fish and Game to review current policies regarding mountain lions and consider broadening them to encourage communication and collaboration between wardens and outside wildlife specialists before lethal control is used, if and whenever possible, and, additionally, to consider the possibility of licensing at least one mountain lion rehabilitation facility in California.

Wildlife Emergency Services
1,386 supporters