G.U.S.T (Grow Urban Shade Trees)

1,603 supporters

As the Council prepares its policies with the Wyong/Gosford merger we ask that consideration be given to preparing a substantial tree replenishment policy that will contribute to increased urban tree canopy. It is imperative that a positive way forward be implemented, rather than the destructive tree policy that has been followed in the Wyong council area. We would like to suggest Council investigate a policy along the lines of that adopted by Newcastle City Council. http://www.newcastle.nsw.gov.au/Living/Environment/Trees/Public-Trees/Tree-Planting To support this request we submit the following MANY PROVEN BENEFITS FOR BOTH THE CITY AND ITS RESIDENTS : Trees beautify our streetscape, add value to property, provide shade, UV protection, absorb CO2 from car exhaust & replace it with oxygen, provide food and shelter for insects, mammals & birds and contribute to local biodiversity. There are many social, economic and ecological benefits. Tree Foliage softens hard fence lines & roofs, absorbs dust, reduces glare & provides privacy for residents. Trees help absorb excess run off, protect waterways and help prevent soil erosion. When mulched, trees act like a sponge that filters this water naturally and uses it to recharge groundwater. Economic Value a tree lined street is known to increase the value of houses by up to 30%. A street tree or tree in the front yard can add 5.4% to total value of a home. Trees Cool - shaded treed areas have been shown to reduce the surrounding temperature by 8 to 10 degrees. Trees help in combating climate change - excess carbon dioxide (CO2) is building up in our atmosphere and contributing to climate change. Trees absorb CO2, removing and storing the carbon while releasing the oxygen back into the air  Shade from trees can reduce the air conditioning costs of detached houses by 20% to 30%. Trees reduce violence neighbourhoods and homes that are barren have been shown to have a greater incidence of violence in and out of the home than their greener counterparts. A well treed city with a substantial canopy creates an aesthetic value to both the present and future generations. PROPOSED ACTIONS FOR CENTRAL COAST COUNCIL 1. Adopt a "no net loss" policy in regard to trees so that any tree removed must be replaced with a substantial tree. This policy must be enforceable. 2. Establish a replenishment policy to address past losses. 3. See trees as a big picture issue providing a sense of place and instilling a sense of pride in our community. eg. Annual Jacaranda festival in Grafton. 4. Appoint an Asset Manager for trees. Consider public trees as major infrastructure and an asset to be maintained and protected. Reflect this in strategic planning as a point for compliance in key planning documents. 5. Connectivity important. Retain wildlife corridors – retain and expand COSS – retain and replenish green public spaces and parks with an emphasis on native species. 6. Establish a street tree planting policy which has an annual goal and encourages community involvement with continuation of Gosford’s current free tree policy for nature strips. Integrate street tree planting as part of each new kerb & gutter road project. 7. Establish a development policy that ensures all developments include site landscaping that is meaningful, compatible and adequately redresses any loss as a result of the development with mature replacements. Tree loss as a result of development that cannot be replaced on site should be offset with replacements on other suitable land or public green sites. 8. Limit the use of hard surfaces, paving and cement on properties which increases run off and leaves no space for vegetation. 9. Encourage the protection and maintenance of vegetation on private land e.g. Habitat for Wildlife programme. 10. Establish an ongoing education programme for residents to promote the value of trees. 11. Investigate other local government areas such as Newcastle which has an active street tree planting policy and a register of all trees http://www.newcastle.nsw.gov.au/Living/Environment/Trees/Public-Trees/Tree-Planting References https://www.treepeople.org/resources/tree-benefits This submission is asking for development of a substantial tree replenishment and replacement policy that will contribute to increased urban tree canopy. Do you anticipate that this policy can be achieved by the newly merged Central Coast Council? Could a Master Plan be created to implement the policy? We look forward to hearing from you. Carey Buls - Convenor This submission has been developed by the following citizens who have formed the group to progress this issue and work toward creating an urban tree canopy for our city. Carey Buls careybuls@gmail.com Mel Chandler mel.chandler@hotmail.com Deb Sunartha debbiesunartha@gmail.com David Duncan david@landlivearch.com Jen Wilder miswilder@gmail.com We are joined in support of the submission by the following community environmental organisations. CEN (Community Environmental Network) Jane Smith cen@cen.org Central Coast Greens Wolfgang Koerner secretary@centralcoast.nsw.greens Kariong Eco garden Geoff Preece kariongecogarden@gmail.com Save Central Coast Reserves Sue Chidgey suechidgey@outlook.com Bateau Bay Bushcare group John Salmon jksalmon@southernphone.com.au Trees of Bateau Bay Barbara & John Gorman jbgorman2@bigpond.com Save Wyong Trees Cath Connor catco53@gmail. com Australian Conservation Foundation - Gosford Branch John Wiggin pso795@iprimus.com.au Peninsula Environment Group Elizabeth Gordon info@peg.org.au Umina Community Group Mel Chandler mel.chandler@hotmail.com South St. Umina Bushcare Deb Sunartha debbiesunartha@gmail.com Woy Woy Peninsula Community Garden Jill Meredith jillm@innerjourneys.com.au

Started 1 petition

Petitioning Gary Murphy

Central Coast Council: Establish an Urban Forest Strategy for the Central Coast

Since the introduction of the NSW Government's State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) Affordable Housing 2009, the Central Coast has experienced unprecedented loss of mature trees in front and back yards. For every granny flat that goes up, mature trees are coming down - yet the Central Coast Council is doing nothing to offset the devastating loss of shade and habitat. A growing number of cities (for example, City of Sydney, Perth and - now famously - City of Melbourne) are prioritising proactive tree planting and shade production in their town planning by publishing Urban Forest Strategies*, yet the Central Coast - an area experiencing some of the most rapid population growth in NSW - still does not have formal shade production and green space targets. Moreover, the council has recently stopped providing residents with free native trees, something it has done for decades. WHY? Following years of a passive (some would argue, retrograde) approach to managing existing trees, including a lack of any strategic plans for succession planting and carbon offsetting, Central Coast suburbs are gradually becoming hotter, drier and more barren. Pedestrians - primarily children, mothers with prams and the elderly - are met with shadeless streets which on a summer day make the simple pursuit of walking an unbearable task. Newcomers to the Central Coast are often heard remarking at the lack of shade, and the absence of atmospheric tree-lined streets in shopping strips and urban spaces. In an area known for its National Parks and world-class beaches, the back streets of Central Coast suburbs present a stark contrast.  We know that granny flats and multiple dwelling developments - much-needed affordable housing options for many - are here to stay. What we urge the Central Coast Council to acknowledge is that as the population becomes denser, and larger homes and less green space become the norm unique stresses are being placed on our suburbs. Planners and policy-makers can no longer ignore the requirement for strategic policies and programs to not only increase the retention of existing hardy trees, but to proactively add to the urban canopy to ensure shade for the future.  We call on new CEO Gary Murphy and the Central Coast Council to act now to establish policies and guidelines to prevent unnecessary tree removal and to promote proactive tree planting in suburbs, parks and nature strips. We urge you to take the steps needed to ensure that Central Coast suburbs are vibrant and liveable places...now, and in the future. Many, many cities already have Urban Forest Plans which formalise the value and benefits of trees as community and environmental assets worthy of protection and promotion. *Urban Forest Plan. An urban forest is broadly defined as the collection of green spaces, trees and other vegetation that grows within an urban area, on both public and private land. It provides a range of social, environmental and economic benefits that enrich the quality of urban life. Reference: https://www.perth.wa.gov.au/planning-development/city-initiatives/urban-forest-plan Additional resources: http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/community/parks-open-spaces/urban-forest/Pages/urban-forest-strategy.aspx http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/live/trees/urban-forest http://www.governmentarchitect.nsw.gov.au/thinking/greener-places http://202020vision.com.au/media/53149/urban-forest-strategy-fa_lores_spreads.pdf      

G.U.S.T (Grow Urban Shade Trees)
1,603 supporters