Student Net Alliance

298,624 Supporters

The Student Net Alliance combines new digital tools with impactful organizing tactics to empower students to protect their interests online. Our education and communication rely on policies that support a free and open flow of information, and technologies that ensure our private communications are protected online and offline. By technologically leveling the playing field, we will succeed thanks to the platform we fight to protect.

Started 6 petitions

Petitioning U.S. House of Representatives

Protect Net Neutrality

Earlier this year, the Federal Communications Commission approved strong Net Neutrality protection by reclassifying broadband as a utility. Over four million Americans made their voices heard over the past year in what was the single largest public response to an FCC decision ever! But now, some members of Congress are trying to sneak in language to government funding bills that would undermine the Net Neutrality protections we fought so hard for. Many of these politicians have received thousands of dollars in donations from the ISPs (internet service providers) like Comcast and Verizon who oppose Net Neutrality. We showed the FCC how important Net Neutrality is. Now the ball is in our court to preserve it and show strong support for the FCC’s decision to ensure paid-prioritization, blocking, and throttling are non-existent on the web. Sign our petition asking Congress to protect Net Neutrality. Don’t let big-dollar interests drown out and distract from the millions of citizens who made their opinions known. Let’s stand united for an open internet and make sure our Representatives actually represent us.

Student Net Alliance
4,249 supporters
Petitioning U.S. Senate

Don't tax the internet

Since 1998, there has been a ban on taxing Internet access. But that ban is set to expire on November 1, 2014 unless the Senate passes the Internet Tax Freedom Forever Act - which will permanently extend the ban on Internet access taxes. Just last week, the House voted in favor of the permanent extension of the Internet Tax Freedom Act and the Senate could vote on this issue any day now. That's why it's so imporant you sign this petition and send a message to your Senator today!  If the Senate fails to pass this bill, many U.S. residents could see tax increases on something as simple as accessing the internet. Access to the internet is essential to families and students throughout the country and taxing it will make it more difficult for low-income families to maintain that access.  

Student Net Alliance
143,284 supporters
Petitioning U.S. House of Representatives

Protect Internet Privacy: Stop CISA

In 2012 and 2013, some members of Congress tried to pass the privacy killing bill CISPA. But Americans pushed back and defeated it. Now CISPA is back - only it's being called CISA - and it's even worse than before.  Don't be fooled by the new name. The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2014 (CISA) is a serious threat to your privacy and civil rights. If passed, it will give the National Security Agency increased access to our private data and allow the NSA to share that data with police and other law enforcement agencies under the guise of "cybersecurity."  It creates a loophole in current privacy laws - allowing the government to ask companies and universities to hand over your private data without a warrant. Basically, it allows for your Fourth Amendment rights to be ignored and your private citizenship to be revoked. The bill has already passed the Senate Intelligence Committee and could be voted on in the full Senate soon.   Sign this petition to send a strong message to your members of Congress that you won't stand for attacks on our civil liberties. Stop CISA! logo by Somerset Bean

Student Net Alliance
40,775 supporters
Petitioning U.S. Senate

Publicly disclose the contents of the TPP

Does this sound like a normal decision making process to you? After being hastily moved clear across Canada to avoid public protests, twelve countries' delegates and private company lobbyists are meeting behind close doors to finalize a trade agreement that affects not only their countries' residents, but the entire Internet too. WTF? Those involved include the United States, Australia, Peru, Malaysia, Vietnam, New Zealand, Chile, Singapore, and Brunei, while Mexico, Canada, & Japan are in the process of joining. What do we know? Only through a leaked chapter from the Trans-Pacific Partnership do we know that just one aspect intends to rewrite the rules of Intellectual Property on the Internet. Special interests and lobbyists have had full access to TPP negotiations, leaving the peoples' interests (as well as Congress) completely locked out of the process. We need to take action now in order to help bring awareness to the Trans-Pacific Partnership for what it really is, a behind-the-scenes blockade of free expression which will inevitably reduce due process, increase methods of censorship, and stifle innovation at a global level. Worse off, the TPP seeks to extend copyright protections from a current (and dare we say outdated) model to an even longer protection for individual works "for life plus 70 years," and for a publication/corporate-made content, "life plus 120 years." The Obama Administration must make its agencies accountable to the public for their secret laws. Join us in demanding that the Office of the US Trade Representatives be required to publicly disclose the contents of the TPP and enforce a policy of transparency. Learn more:  https://www.eff.org/issues/tpp http://www.exposethetpp.org/TPPImpacts_InternetFreedom.html

Student Net Alliance
299 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Tom Wheeler

Save Net Neutrality

The open Internet is in peril - a federal appeals court just struck down Net Neutrality and sided with giant corporations like Verizon who want to control how we experience the Internet. Now, Internet service providers like Verizon can block content they disagree with or slow down access to websites who can't afford to pay what corporations can for higher speeds. But we can still stop this.  The FCC has the power to protect Net Neutrality by reclassifying broadband as a telecommunications service. Doing so will give them the power to reinstate the Net Neutrality protections taken away by Verizon. It's absolutely necessary that they do this because net neutrality is the basis for what has made the Internet a place where what you know is more valuable than whom you know. Net Neutrality is incredibly important to the Student Net Alliance because it allows the free flow of ideas to shape our education. An open Internet provides one of the purest forms of democracy today, allowing students to access a limitless supply of information, for relatively low cost and with great ease. When those invaluable avenues for education and social interaction are threatened by entrenched corporations acting as gatekeepers in pursuit of profit, the Student Net Alliance (SNA) mobilizes students, educators, and alumni worldwide to defend the Internet as a tool for everyone to use with equal caliber. We can't stand idly by while the Internet is sold to the highest bidder. Join us in asking the FCC to reclassify broadband as a telecommunications service. 

Student Net Alliance
99,793 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Robert Mueller

Eric Holder: Allow tech companies to publish NSA data requests

After a leak of documents from the National Security Agency showed that a secret program called PRISM allows widespread surveillance of U.S. citizens' phone and internet activities with some of the world's biggest tech corporations, the nation is concerned and confused about our privacy rights.  President Obama and the NSA have stated that widespread spying of Americans is not taking place and that the government is only requesting certain data from these companies. There is an easy way to show if this is true and that companies like Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Twitter have taken the commendable step of requesting that the NSA allow them to publish the records of government data requests in their company transparency reports.  In part, Google's letter states: Assertions in the press that our compliance with these requests gives the U.S. government unfettered access to our users’ data are simply untrue. However, government nondisclosure obligations regarding the number of FISA national security requests that Google receives, as well as the number of accounts covered by those requests, fuel that speculation.We therefore ask you to help make it possible for Google to publish in our Transparency Report aggregate numbers of national security requests, including FISA disclosures—in terms of both the number we receive and their scope. Google’s numbers would clearly show that our compliance with these requests falls far short of the claims being made. Google has nothing to hide.  The government allowed Google to start reporting the number of national security letters they received requesting data earlier this year, but they are still barred from releasing information about Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) orders. The requests for this data often comes in the form of secret court orders that not only force these companies to give data but also make it impossible for them to discuss even the basic details. That should change. By allowing these companies to include this information in their transparency reports, the government will be giving American citizens at least some of the insight we deserve about how our daily activities like emails and Google searches are being tracked by the government. 

Student Net Alliance
10,224 supporters