Organize Justice

2,540 supporters

Our aim is to empower people impacted by the justice system to change the criminal justice system in Dallas.

Started 7 petitions

Victory
Petitioning Texas State House, Rep. Aycock, Rep. White, Rep. Price, Rep. Turner

Protect Texas families by voting for HB 549 as is.

Texas is a state built around the premise there is no unit more important than the family. Rep. Eric Johnson's (Dallas) HB 549 would preserve and restore (in facilities that have already ended in-person visits) face-to-face visitation for family members whose loved one is incarcerated in a county jail. HB 549 has been placed on the Texas House Calendar Today Friday, May 8th. Unfortunately the Sheriff's association and other special interest groups that seek to make profit off the backs of those who can least afford it are using legislative tricks to keep the bill where it is. If the bill stays much longer it will die, leaving thousands of families across this great state in peril of losing in-person visitation. Nothing can replace seeing someone in-person. Whether its Skype, FaceTime, or other forms of video chatting, no one would suggest these are even remotely the same as sitting across from a person, looking into their eyes, and having a conversation. When people are incarcerated in our jails, the same is true, visitation by video is no substitute for maintaining strong vibrant relationships on both sides of the jail walls. Counties across the state have entered into contracts with companies that force the jail to restrict and often strip families abilities to see their loved ones. People could spend weeks, months, even years, never actually being able to see their son, daughter, father, mother. After you sign:  Your call CAN make a difference. We have done it once, let's do it again!!!!!  Please contact your Representative today!!! Thursday May 7 in support of House Bill 549 - continuing face-to-face visits in county jails.  To find out who your State Representative is and their contact information, visit “Who Represents Me” at http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/Home.aspx Below is a sample phone script you can use (or whatever you feel comfortable with). Hi, my name is …………… and I would like to ask my Representative, Rep. ………….. to support House Bill 549 which is scheduled to be heard on the House Floor on Friday May 8. HB 549 will guarantee that families will be able to continue face-to-face visits with their loved ones who are in a county jail. When people are incarcerated in our jails, visitation by video is no substitute when trying to maintain strong family relationships and supporting a loved one until they are allowed to return home. Thank you for your support!!  

Organize Justice
245 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Texas House Calendars, Todd Hunter, Eddie Lucio, Roberto Alonzo, Byron Cook, Sarah Davis, Charlie Geren, Helen Giddings, Patricia Harless, Dan Huberty, Eric Johnson, Ken King, Lyle Larson, Four Pri...

Please bring HB 549 to the House floor.

Texas is a state built around the premise there is no unit more important than the family. Rep. Eric Johnson's (Dallas) HB 549 would preserve face-to-face visitation for family members whose loved one is incarcerated in a county jail. HB 549 has already been voted out of committee, in order to get a vote by the full House, the Calendars Committee needs to set an early date. Unfortunately the Sheriff's association and other special interest groups that seek to make profit off the backs of those who can least afford it are using legislative tricks to keep the bill where it is. If the bill stays much longer it will die, leaving thousands of families across this great state in peril of losing in-person visitation. Nothing can replace seeing someone in-person. Whether its Skype, FaceTime, or other forms of video chatting, no one would suggest these are even remotely the same as sitting across from a person, looking into their eyes, and having a conversation. When people are incarcerated in our jails, the same is true, visitation by video is no substitute for maintaining strong vibrant relationships on both sides of the jail walls. Counties across the state have entered into contracts with companies that force the jail to restrict and often strip families abilities to see their loved ones. People could spend weeks, months, even years, never actually being able to see their son, daughter, father, mother. Please sign and share the power of the people is needed!  

Organize Justice
267 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Texas House Committee on County Affairs

Please support HB 549- protect in-person visits for families!

Nothing can replace seeing someone in-person. Whether its Skype, FaceTime, or other forms of video chatting, no one would suggest these are even remotely the same as sitting across from a person, looking into their eyes, and having a conversation. When people are incarcerated in our jails, the same is true, visitation by video is no substitute for maintaining strong vibrant relationships on both sides of the jail walls. Counties across the state have entered into contracts with companies that force the jail to restrict and often strip families abilities to see their loved ones. People could spend weeks, months, even years, never actually being able to see their son, daughter, father, mother. Bottom line, Texas is a state built around the premise their is no unit more important than the family. Rep. Eric Johnson's (Dallas) HB 549 would preserve in-person visitation for family members whose loved one is incarcerated in a county jail. Please sign and share!   A few notable quotes from Prison Policy Initiative’s Report on Video Visitation (http://www.prisonpolicy.org/visitation/report.html):    “Most families — the end-users of video visitation — are deeply unhappy with the combination of video visitation’s poor quality, the cost of visitation, and the fact that jails often force the service on them.”   “It is more difficult for families to ensure or evaluate the wellbeing of their incarcerated loved ones via video than in-person or through-the-glass. Families struggle to clearly see the incarcerated person with video visits and instead face a pixelated or sometimes frozen image of the incarcerated person. The poor quality of the visits only increases family members’ anxiety.”   “With few exceptions, jail video visitation is a step backward for correctional policy because it eliminates in-person visits that are unquestionably important to rehabilitation while simultaneously making money off of families desperate to stay in touch.”    

Organize Justice
1,260 supporters