Derby Animal Rights

5,114 supporters

Started 7 petitions

Victory
Petitioning Glebe Farm, PR Manager

Don't allow the Cruel Animal Circus to Perform on your Land

Peter Jolly’s Circus holes up at its Shropshire base for 4-5 months each year for a winter break. ADI made extensive observations of the winter quarters during two winter breaks using hidden cameras in March and November 2015, and again in February and March 2016. Despite that the site has been in operation for decades and been inspected by Defra, there is little evidence that any effort has been put into providing appropriate facilities for the animals. The ADI team filmed: Appalling overcrowding Fighting between animals A worker spitting in the face of and tormenting a camel Ponies tangled in short tethers Animals crammed in a run-down building for 14 hours a day Some animals shut in the dilapidated building for days on end On one occasion, animals tethered for up to 40 hours Government regulations ignored During the first 16-hour observation, zebras Watusi and Zumba, Kashmir the camel, and Onkuli the ankole never left the barn (the ankole died on tour a few months later). The UK’s temporary regulations governing the use of wild animals in circuses in England stipulate that licensed animals must have “the opportunity for physical exercise for a minimum of six hours in any 24 hour period” and that “Reasonable effort must be made to allow grazing animals an opportunity to graze on a daily basis.” During two of the ADI visits, zebras Watusi and Zumba were confined to a tiny pen. Measuring just 7.8 square metres, this is less than half the minimum 20 square metres stipulated by Defra. Camel Kashmir and ankole Onkuli shared a pen of 17.65 square metres, again falling short of the required minimum size. ADI believes Defra’s minimum requirement of a space just 4 metres by 5 metres for a wild animal such as a zebra is inadequate – yet Jolly’s did not even provide this. Tethered for at least 16 hours of the day, the camel and ankole were unable to turn around comfortably. Domesticated species were confined also, with two goats sharing a tiny concrete cell just 2.6 square metres and seven llamas housed in a small pen. Tied up and unable to escape, Kashmir the camel was filmed being intimidated, taunted and spat at by a worker. Last month, during the most recent 13-day ADI observation, 18 equines were tethered and crowded inside the barn for approximately 15 hours every day, and on one occasion for a continuous 40-hour period. Kashmir the camel was confined to his pen for 6 days; while the goats were forced to spend their entire time in the tiny pen, their only respite when their pen was cleaned and they were tied up in the main area of the barn for 6 hours.  Bullying is rife as horses, ponies and donkeys vie for space. Individuals were filmed biting and kicking one another as tempers flare and tethers become tangled. The 18 animals share a space less than 12 metres by 5.5 metres and are unable to lie down comfortably. The Defra Code of Practice for equines (a code not specific to circuses) states “as a minimum, each horse should have sufficient room to lie down, readily rise and turn around in comfort”. The animals also do not have access to water when indoors; the Code of Practice states that “It is essential that all horses have continuous access to a clean supply of fresh water. When this is impractical adequate clean water should be made available to them on a frequent and regular basis”. Horses can require anything from 20-70 litres of water daily. Peter Jolly’s Circus is one of two circuses licensed to perform in England with wild animals. There are no such regulations for domestic species. Despite a 2012 commitment and a 2015 manifesto pledge to ban wild animals in circuses, little progress has been made to pass legislation. Two Private Members’ Bills using the government’s own wording, most recently introduced by Conservative MP Will Quince in February, have been unsuccessful.

Derby Animal Rights
860 supporters
Petitioning Yesteryear Rally

Don't allow the Cruel Animal Circus to Perform on your Land

Peter Jolly’s Circus holes up at its Shropshire base for 4-5 months each year for a winter break. ADI made extensive observations of the winter quarters during two winter breaks using hidden cameras in March and November 2015, and again in February and March 2016. Despite that the site has been in operation for decades and been inspected by Defra, there is little evidence that any effort has been put into providing appropriate facilities for the animals. The ADI team filmed: Appalling overcrowding Fighting between animals A worker spitting in the face of and tormenting a camel Ponies tangled in short tethers Animals crammed in a run-down building for 14 hours a day Some animals shut in the dilapidated building for days on end On one occasion, animals tethered for up to 40 hours Government regulations ignored During the first 16-hour observation, zebras Watusi and Zumba, Kashmir the camel, and Onkuli the ankole never left the barn (the ankole died on tour a few months later). The UK’s temporary regulations governing the use of wild animals in circuses in England stipulate that licensed animals must have “the opportunity for physical exercise for a minimum of six hours in any 24 hour period” and that “Reasonable effort must be made to allow grazing animals an opportunity to graze on a daily basis.” During two of the ADI visits, zebras Watusi and Zumba were confined to a tiny pen. Measuring just 7.8 square metres, this is less than half the minimum 20 square metres stipulated by Defra. Camel Kashmir and ankole Onkuli shared a pen of 17.65 square metres, again falling short of the required minimum size. ADI believes Defra’s minimum requirement of a space just 4 metres by 5 metres for a wild animal such as a zebra is inadequate – yet Jolly’s did not even provide this. Tethered for at least 16 hours of the day, the camel and ankole were unable to turn around comfortably. Domesticated species were confined also, with two goats sharing a tiny concrete cell just 2.6 square metres and seven llamas housed in a small pen. Tied up and unable to escape, Kashmir the camel was filmed being intimidated, taunted and spat at by a worker. Last month, during the most recent 13-day ADI observation, 18 equines were tethered and crowded inside the barn for approximately 15 hours every day, and on one occasion for a continuous 40-hour period. Kashmir the camel was confined to his pen for 6 days; while the goats were forced to spend their entire time in the tiny pen, their only respite when their pen was cleaned and they were tied up in the main area of the barn for 6 hours.  Bullying is rife as horses, ponies and donkeys vie for space. Individuals were filmed biting and kicking one another as tempers flare and tethers become tangled. The 18 animals share a space less than 12 metres by 5.5 metres and are unable to lie down comfortably. The Defra Code of Practice for equines (a code not specific to circuses) states “as a minimum, each horse should have sufficient room to lie down, readily rise and turn around in comfort”. The animals also do not have access to water when indoors; the Code of Practice states that “It is essential that all horses have continuous access to a clean supply of fresh water. When this is impractical adequate clean water should be made available to them on a frequent and regular basis”. Horses can require anything from 20-70 litres of water daily. Peter Jolly’s Circus is one of two circuses licensed to perform in England with wild animals. There are no such regulations for domestic species. Despite a 2012 commitment and a 2015 manifesto pledge to ban wild animals in circuses, little progress has been made to pass legislation. Two Private Members’ Bills using the government’s own wording, most recently introduced by Conservative MP Will Quince in February, have been unsuccessful.

Derby Animal Rights
1,208 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Hadley Farm and Cross Country

Don't allow the Cruel Animal Circus to Perform on your Land

Peter Jolly’s Circus holes up at its Shropshire base for 4-5 months each year for a winter break. ADI made extensive observations of the winter quarters during two winter breaks using hidden cameras in March and November 2015, and again in February and March 2016. Despite that the site has been in operation for decades and been inspected by Defra, there is little evidence that any effort has been put into providing appropriate facilities for the animals. The ADI team filmed: Appalling overcrowding Fighting between animals A worker spitting in the face of and tormenting a camel Ponies tangled in short tethers Animals crammed in a run-down building for 14 hours a day Some animals shut in the dilapidated building for days on end On one occasion, animals tethered for up to 40 hours Government regulations ignored During the first 16-hour observation, zebras Watusi and Zumba, Kashmir the camel, and Onkuli the ankole never left the barn (the ankole died on tour a few months later). The UK’s temporary regulations governing the use of wild animals in circuses in England stipulate that licensed animals must have “the opportunity for physical exercise for a minimum of six hours in any 24 hour period” and that “Reasonable effort must be made to allow grazing animals an opportunity to graze on a daily basis.” During two of the ADI visits, zebras Watusi and Zumba were confined to a tiny pen. Measuring just 7.8 square metres, this is less than half the minimum 20 square metres stipulated by Defra. Camel Kashmir and ankole Onkuli shared a pen of 17.65 square metres, again falling short of the required minimum size. ADI believes Defra’s minimum requirement of a space just 4 metres by 5 metres for a wild animal such as a zebra is inadequate – yet Jolly’s did not even provide this. Tethered for at least 16 hours of the day, the camel and ankole were unable to turn around comfortably. Domesticated species were confined also, with two goats sharing a tiny concrete cell just 2.6 square metres and seven llamas housed in a small pen. Tied up and unable to escape, Kashmir the camel was filmed being intimidated, taunted and spat at by a worker. Last month, during the most recent 13-day ADI observation, 18 equines were tethered and crowded inside the barn for approximately 15 hours every day, and on one occasion for a continuous 40-hour period. Kashmir the camel was confined to his pen for 6 days; while the goats were forced to spend their entire time in the tiny pen, their only respite when their pen was cleaned and they were tied up in the main area of the barn for 6 hours.  Bullying is rife as horses, ponies and donkeys vie for space. Individuals were filmed biting and kicking one another as tempers flare and tethers become tangled. The 18 animals share a space less than 12 metres by 5.5 metres and are unable to lie down comfortably. The Defra Code of Practice for equines (a code not specific to circuses) states “as a minimum, each horse should have sufficient room to lie down, readily rise and turn around in comfort”. The animals also do not have access to water when indoors; the Code of Practice states that “It is essential that all horses have continuous access to a clean supply of fresh water. When this is impractical adequate clean water should be made available to them on a frequent and regular basis”. Horses can require anything from 20-70 litres of water daily. Peter Jolly’s Circus is one of two circuses licensed to perform in England with wild animals. There are no such regulations for domestic species. Despite a 2012 commitment and a 2015 manifesto pledge to ban wild animals in circuses, little progress has been made to pass legislation. Two Private Members’ Bills using the government’s own wording, most recently introduced by Conservative MP Will Quince in February, have been unsuccessful.

Derby Animal Rights
629 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Distinct Darlington

Stop Exploiting animals for Festive Entertainment

Christmas should be a time where compassion is shown towards all beings, yet animals are transported all over the country at Christmas for events at shopping centres and noisy displays. It is widely accepted that animals suffer stress during events. The public have spoken out against such events as many feel that these events are an inappropriate place for animals. The Government-appointed Farm Animal Welfare Committee has stated that: “reindeer have been imported and kept in small zoological collections or open farms where they are used as a visitor attraction, particularly at Christmas. There have been a number of reports of ill thrift and death in these animals due to poor management and their special dietary and environmental requirements.” Dr. John Fletcher from the Veterinary Deer Society is reported as saying: “Reindeer have adapted to live in the Arctic. They are not well able to cope with the stress of captivity, and most of the diseases we see here in reindeer are stress-related … We would like Defra to stop importing them.” Wild animals like penguins need very specific care, habitats and space to be able to live life to the fullest. Penguins used in events like this are exposed to large crowds and noise, potentially causing stress or fear. As well as welfare concerns, using wild animals as a form of ‘entertainment’ sends out the wrong educational messages to the public, in particular children. Animals like penguins do not belong on a High Street in the UK and this event does nothing to teach about conservation or respect for species and habitats.  

Derby Animal Rights
826 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Touchwood Solihull, Kerry Alligan, Helen Brown, Solihull BID

Save the Penguins ! (Touchwood Solihull)

Wild animals like penguins need very specific care, habitats and space to be able to live life to the fullest. Penguins used in events like this are exposed to large crowds and noise, potentially causing stress or fear. As well as welfare concerns, using wild animals as a form of ‘entertainment’ sends out the wrong educational messages to the public, in particular children. Animals like penguins do not belong on a High Street in the UK and this event does nothing to teach about conservation or respect for species and habitats.

Derby Animal Rights
604 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Derby Ice Rink, Derby LIVE, Derby City Council

Save the Reindeer! (Derby Christmas Ice rink)

In December, reindeer will once again be transported to the Derby to provide live entertainment at the Derby Christmas Ice rink. We believe that the Christmas season should be one of joy and peace for all. We feel that there are many other ways that local residents could celebrate this Christmas without compromising the wellbeing of animals. Christmas should be a time where compassion is shown towards all beings, yet animals are transported all over the country at Christmas for events at shopping centres and noisy displays. It is widely accepted that animals suffer stress during events such as the Santa's Winter Wonderland. The public have spoken out against such events as many feel that these events are an inappropriate place for animals. The Government-appointed Farm Animal Welfare Committee has stated that: “reindeer have been imported and kept in small zoological collections or open farms where they are used as a visitor attraction, particularly at Christmas. There have been a number of reports of ill thrift and death in these animals due to poor management and their special dietary and environmental requirements.” Dr. John Fletcher from the Veterinary Deer Society is reported as saying: “Reindeer have adapted to live in the Arctic. They are not well able to cope with the stress of captivity, and most of the diseases we see here in reindeer are stress-related … We would like Defra to stop importing them.” What harm is caused? Animals, such as reindeer, used in seasonal displays, are forced into close contact with the public, which leaves them stressed and afraid. Reindeer are not domestic animals, and their instincts remain very much intact in captivity. Contact with people is something they normally avoid. When used as "props", they are denied the opportunity to engage in natural behaviour and roam freely over vast open ranges, as they would in their natural circumpolar habitat. Travelling animal displays also contribute to a cruel cycle of breeding, abandonment and killing. Exhibitors take young animals on the road and, if they survive the stress of transport and handling, typically dispose of them when they become more difficult to handle, replacing them with new animals. Every year, sanctuaries have to turn away requests to house large animals. Please sign this petition to show your support in helping to save these beautiful animals from this stressful ordeal. Interesting links for further reading http://www.captiveanimals.org/rudolph http://www.peta.org.uk/blog/rudolph-doesnt-belong-shopping-centre/ http://www.bornfree.org.uk/news/news-article/?no_cache=1&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=1736  Sources People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) Captive Animals Protective Society (CAPS) Born Free Foundation

Derby Animal Rights
245 supporters
Victory
Petitioning Ludlow Football Club

Save the Reindeer! (Frosty's Christmas World)

In December, reindeer will once again be transported to the Ludlow Football Club to provide live entertainment for its Frosty's Christmas World Event. We believe that the Christmas season should be one of joy and peace for all. We feel that there are many other ways that local residents could celebrate this Christmas without compromising the wellbeing of animals. Christmas should be a time where compassion is shown towards all beings, yet animals are transported all over the country at Christmas for events at shopping centres and noisy displays. It is widely accepted that animals suffer stress during events such as the Frosty's Christmas World. The public have spoken out against such events as many feel that these events are an inappropriate place for animals. The Government-appointed Farm Animal Welfare Committee has stated that: “reindeer have been imported and kept in small zoological collections or open farms where they are used as a visitor attraction, particularly at Christmas. There have been a number of reports of ill thrift and death in these animals due to poor management and their special dietary and environmental requirements.” Dr. John Fletcher from the Veterinary Deer Society is reported as saying: “Reindeer have adapted to live in the Arctic. They are not well able to cope with the stress of captivity, and most of the diseases we see here in reindeer are stress-related … We would like Defra to stop importing them.”   What harm is caused? Animals, such as reindeer, used in seasonal displays, are forced into close contact with the public, which leaves them stressed and afraid. Reindeer are not domestic animals, and their instincts remain very much intact in captivity. Contact with people is something they normally avoid. When used as "props", they are denied the opportunity to engage in natural behaviour and roam freely over vast open ranges, as they would in their natural circumpolar habitat. Travelling animal displays also contribute to a cruel cycle of breeding, abandonment and killing. Exhibitors take young animals on the road and, if they survive the stress of transport and handling, typically dispose of them when they become more difficult to handle, replacing them with new animals. Every year, sanctuaries have to turn away requests to house large animals.   Please sign this petition to show your support in helping to save these beautiful animals from this stressful ordeal.  Interesting links for further reading http://www.captiveanimals.org/rudolph http://www.peta.org.uk/blog/rudolph-doesnt-belong-shopping-centre/ http://www.bornfree.org.uk/news/news-article/?no_cache=1&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=1736  Sources People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) Captive Animals Protective Society (CAPS) Born Free Foundation

Derby Animal Rights
742 supporters