Black History Month

Black history is change.

Feb 20, 2020

My name is Ansa and I’ve been working at Change.org for nearly two years now. For me, it’s been a place where I can be my authentic self while advancing issues that are important to underrepresented communities. Every day, I get to help ordinary people launch petitions that have a chance to change the course of history.

This Black History Month, I’m inspired by the heroes in the black community who are making real-life impact. Because for me, black history is just that: the fight for — and celebration of — change for the better. 

Please join me in reading a few stories about people who are leading powerful petitions. And meet a few of us who work at Change.org to help petition starters bring their campaigns to life:

Jerome is 17 years old and is a leader in the youth climate movement. Every week he protests outside the White House, and he’s even founded an organization focused on getting young people to vote. Last year, he started a petition for climate activist Greta Thunberg to be named Time’s Person of the Year — and he won! To Jerome, black history means fighting for a better tomorrow for all.  Read about Jerome’s victory.

My colleague Rashawn has an amazing job. Right now, he’s empowering a community of tens of thousands of people who want to cut the cost of life-saving insulin. One by one, states like Illinois and Colorado are buckling under the public pressure to put price caps on insulin. Rashawn’s work is an incredible example of standing up for fairness in healthcare and beyond.

Rihanna started a petition to get better representation of the black community in emojis. She believes that #AfroHairMatters – and she has the support of almost 70,000 petition signers. Rihanna is making sure that everyone has the ability to see reflections of themselves online and in the world around them. Join Rihanna’s campaign.

Lindsay works at Change.org as the Director of Technical Recruiting. Her work ensures that diversity and inclusion are top of mind in the hiring process. Our recruiting team knows that our company is stronger when the people who work here come from diverse backgrounds. Lindsay and her team work with hiring managers on developing diverse pipelines and hiring processes that are fair and equitable. 

Gene knows that the time for change is now. He’s rallying support to rename Alabama’s Edmund Pettus Bridge after the late Rep. John Lewis. The Selma, Alabama bridge is currently named for a former Confederate general turned U.S. Senator. Gene is fighting for a future where America’s hurtful past is no longer celebrated.  Sign Gene’s petition

There are countless others changing the course of black history every single day. The fight for fairness, equality, and justice is brought to life by petition starters like Gene and Jerome, as well as my colleagues here at Change.org. Together, we will continue to make change that impacts underrepresented communities around the country — and the world.

Thank you for all that you do. Keep fighting. Keep changing.