Gap & Asda: Stop Putting Garment Workers’ Lives at Risk
  • Petitioning Glenn K Murphy

This petition will be delivered to:

Chief Executive, Gap
Glenn K Murphy
Chief Executive, Walmart
Mike Duke

Gap & Asda: Stop Putting Garment Workers’ Lives at Risk

    1. Sponsored by

      War on Want

On 24 April 2013 over 1,100 people were killed when the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh collapsed. The majority of the victims were female garment workers. The disaster became the largest industrial accident in a manufacturing facility in history. But it was entirely preventable.

Under huge public pressure, more than 100 major brands and retailers signed a momentous agreement to ensure these disasters never happen again – the Bangladesh Safety Accord. But Gap and Asda (owned by Walmart) have refused to commit to this agreement.

Gap and Walmart have attempted to salvage their reputation by launching their own rival safety plan. Not only does it undermine the Accord, their plan is a sham. Dominated by the brands it is supposed to regulate, the plan contains no binding commitments and does not involve trade unions. It is just more of the same voluntary, corporate led initiatives that failed to prevent the Rana Plaza disaster, and the deaths of hundreds more garment workers in Bangladesh. Their voluntary plan will not work.

The Bangladesh Safety Accord will save lives. It is a comprehensive project, with transparent factory audits, mandatory repairs, effective worker training and is driven by trade unions. It is already supported by over 100 major brands and retailers including Primark, H&M and Tesco. Crucially, it is legally binding. These companies will be forced to make their supplier factories safe.

Gap and Walmart's refusal to support this project leaves thousands of garment workers’ lives at risk. We believe no one should have to work in unsafe conditions.

Gap and Walmart must sign the Bangladesh Safety Accord now.

Recent signatures

    News

    1. Reached 9,000 signatures
    2. Topshop bosses bow to public pressure on Bangladesh factory safety

      The Arcadia Group – owner of brands including Topshop and Dorothy Perkins – has finally bowed to public pressure and committed to a binding agreement with trade unions to improve conditions in factories in Bangladesh.

      The company joined the Bangladesh Safety Accord, a life-saving agreement already signed by over 80 major brands and retailers to finance factory improvements and guarantee labour rights to factory workers.

      The Arcadia Group’s announcement comes after months of pressure from campaigners and the public after the company failed to meet a deadline in May to join the agreement.

      Over 7,000 of you signed our petition, activists staged a symbolic funeral for the victims of the Rana Plaza outside Topshop’s flagship store and the company was shamed in the press for its failure to act.

      Only after this huge wave of campaigning did Topshop’s bosses sign the Accord and finally live up to their duties to the people who make their clothes.

    3. Reached 7,000 signatures

    Supporters

    Reasons for signing

    • stan CHANDLER SHEFFIELD, UNITED KINGDOM
      • about 1 month ago

      getting good quality undies from outfits that have some degree of good ethics

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • stephanie Forster COBHAM, UNITED KINGDOM
      • 2 months ago

      No clothing is worth more than a life

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Isabelle Monk LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM
      • 2 months ago

      I don't want to live in a society where people suffer to make my clothes. The Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety undermines the Accord. Sign the Accord, driven by trade unions! It will save lives!

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Ruth Miles NOTTINGHAM, UNITED KINGDOM
      • 3 months ago

      Workers need fair and safe working conditions the world over.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • tess goodwin BROUGHTON, UNITED KINGDOM
      • 3 months ago

      in justice should be a thing of the past

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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