Animals are not  Entertainers
  • Petitioning Prime Minister Harper

This petition will be delivered to:

Prime Minister of Canada
Prime Minister Harper
USDA
USDA
European Environment Agency
European Union
AMPTO
AMPTO
Marine Connection
Marine Connection
WAZA
WAZA
Verband dt. Zoodirektoren
Verband dt. Zoodirektoren
Zoo Cologne
Zoo Cologne
Sea World
Sea World
Bundeskanzlerin Germany
Angela Merkel

Animals are not Entertainers

    1. Christiane Henker
    2. Petition by

      Christiane Henker

      Leipzig, Germany

 Millions of animals suffer for human entertainment in zoos, circuses, marine parks, rodeos, horse racing and for tourists’ photos.

Animals are not Entertainers!

In 2010, Sea World’s star attraction, an orca named Tilikum, shocked a group of onlookers when he seized his trainer and pinned her underwater for five minutes. Staff and security had to pry the woman’s body from his mouth. An autopsy later showed that her spinal cord had been severed and her ribs, jawbone, and cervical vertebra fractured. It was not the first time Tilikum had been involved in the death of a trainer. In 1991, along with two other orcas at Sealand in Vancouver, he killed a part-time trainer who slipped and fell into the tank. Eight years later he savaged a 27-year-old man who apparently entered his tank at Sea World after the park had closed. Authorities said the cause of death was hypothermia although the man’s body was covered with abrasions, his testicles had been ripped open, and pieces of his body were found on the bottom of the pool.

In the case of animal attacks and escapes from zoos, circuses, and marine parks, official explanations are almost always at odds with the historical record. This is hardly surprising. The corporations that run these theme parks – the private equity firm Blackstone purchased Sea World for 2.3 billion in 2009 – have a vested interest in promoting an image of harmony among the animals and their handlers. But as Jason Hribal argues in his illuminating book, Fear of the Animal Planet, acts of resistance, from “work” stoppages and sabotage to escape and violent attacks, are far more common than we are led to believe.

 

Beginning with Jumbo the elephant – captured in 1865 and the centerpiece of P.T. Barnum’s circus – Hribal catalogues a long history of abuse, exploitation, and resistance. These animals are often treated poorly, made to live in an environment entirely alien to them (elephants and whales need large amounts of space in which to thrive), and forced to work and perform without end. Jumbo did two shows a day, six days a week and was confined to a small compartment with a concrete floor. This was the only world he knew. Tilikum, shipped around the world from one marine park to another since being captured off the coast of Iceland at the age of two, has performed nearly his entire life. Not surprisingly, the life expectancy and health of these animals is poor compared to their cousins in the wild.

 

 

Most of us, grew up taking family trips to the circus, zoo,  marine park or rodeo. Seeing animals held captive for human amusement was part of life. We never questioned it. While it is assumed that all humans, unless they have committed crimes against society, deserve freedom, we are not used to making that assumption for members of other species. We should ask ourselves why not. What have the animals in a zoo or marine park done to deserve their jail sentences, or the elephants in a circus done to deserve lives spent mostly in chains?

 

Captivity is cruel! Dont go to Circuses,Zoos, Marine Parks, Rodeos, Horse racing.

 

Zoos
Animals in zoos are forced to live in artificial, stressful, and downright boring conditions. Removed from their natural habitats and social structures, they are confined to small, restrictive environments that deprive them of mental and physical stimulation. While zoos claim to provide conservation, education, and entertainment, their primary goal is to sustain public support in order to increase profits.

Zoochosis
Many animals held in captivity begin to form abnormal symptoms referred to as “zoochosis.” These neurotic and atypical behaviors occur as a result of boredom, depression, frustration, a lack of mental and physical enrichment, and removal from their natural habitat and social structures. Signs of zoochosis include:

 

  • Bar Biting
  • Coprophagia (Consuming and playing with excrement)
  • Self-mutilation
  • Circling
  • Rocking
  • Swaying
  • Pacing
  • Rolling, twisting, nodding of the neck or head
  • Vomiting
  • Frequent licking
  • Excessive grooming




 Circuses

 Circus animals often suffer from inadequate care. They spend most of their lives in small, dirty cages, released only to perform. Many circus animals are leased seasonably from dealers; they thus go from one circus to another, providing little incentive for circus owners to keep them healthy. Their access to food and water is thus limited, and they are provided with insufficient veterinary care. Circus animals cannot socialize with other members of their species. They are typically “cared for” by seasonal or temporary circus workers who have little or no experience caring for exotic animals.

An LCA investigator went undercover inside the Carson & Barnes Circus, where he documented extreme animal abuse, including elephants being beaten with baseball bats, pitchforks, and other objects; shocked with electric prods; and hit on the head and across the face. LCA worked with local media to expose this cruelty and filed a complaint with the United State Department of Agriculture in an effort to bring an end to the mistreatment of these magnificent creatures. Watch the undercover footage that aired on California’s KCAL-9 News.

 


Marine Prisons
Marine parks are like prisons to marine mammals. While whales and dolphins travel constantly 35 to 100 miles each day marine park tanks are sometimes as small as 24 by 24 feet wide and 6 feet deep. Animals can swim only a few strokes before hitting a wall. Thus they are forced to swim in circles. 
In the wild, marine mammals are perpetually stimulated by their environment. In captivity, they have only manufactured seaweed. They cannot engage in their natural behaviors nor interact with members of their social group, for it is virtually impossible for captive marine mammals to maintain a family unit. They cannot act on their basic instincts. As a result, many engage in stereotypic behaviors, becoming abnormally aggressive, bored, or depressed.

In the wild, dolphins use echolocation to navigate, bouncing sonar waves off of other objects. In tanks, these sonar waves bounce off the walls, driving some dolphins insane. In spite of this, marine parks oppose efforts to release captive marine mammals back into the wild.

Training
Trainers sometimes withhold food from dolphins and orcas in order to force them to learn and perform tricks. They may also isolate these highly social creatures. This treatment, combined with the stress of being taken from their families and housed with strangers, increases their levels of anxiety and aggression.

Injuries

 

  • Dorsal fin collapse, also known as drooping fin syndrome, due to low water levels 
  • Skin peeling off as a result of over-chlorinated water 
  • Eye irritation caused by chlorine, copper sulfate, and other tank chemicals 
  • Stress related injuries and deaths 

 

 

Rodeos

Rodeo animals are generally tame creatures who must be provoked into battle. They live lives filled with stress and fear. Contestants practice their games on numerous calves, bulls, and so forth, therein injuring and killing many animals before even entering the ring. A contestant's score is based on how long he can ride a struggling animal or how quickly he can overpower an animal. Sprains, broken bones, muscle pulls, saddle blisters, spur wounds, flank strap wounds, punctured lungs, broken ribs, hematomas, bruising, and broken necks are common. Wounded animals are quickly removed while the rodeo announcer distracts the public. The animals that become too injured to participate are sent to slaughter.

 

Dog Fighting


Dog Fighting - two dogs trained to fight are placed in a pit to attack each other until one can no longer continue.

Levels of Dog Fighting
Professional dogfighters generally travel the country and the world, breeding and fighting dogs for profit.
Hobbyists may have a handful of dogs they breed and follow the rules of a refereed dogfight, but they usually stay at the local level.
Street fighters fight all breeds of dogs and normally do not keep track of a dog's record or bloodlines.

Criminal Activity and the Threat to Public Safety
• Dog fight spectators are typically involved in illegal gambling, betting money that a certain dog will prevail.
• Weapons are common at dog-fights because of the large amount of cash present.
• Major drug networks have been tied to animal fighting in several states, and raids on animal fighting operation have resulted in the seizure of large-scale drug operations and revealed underground drug manufacturing labs.
• Dog fighters and spectators have a history of violent and criminal behavior toward people.
• Dog fighting is sometimes used as entertainment for gangs.
• Dogs used in dog fighting are trained to be aggressive. Their presence in the community places others at risk of attack.

 

Horse racing

 

They weigh at least 1,000 pounds, have legs that are supported by ankles the size of a human’s, and are forced to run around dirt tracks at speeds of more than 30 miles per hour while carrying people on their backs. Racehorses are the victims of a multibillion-dollar industry that is rife with drug abuse, injuries, and race fixing, and many horses’ careers end in slaughterhouses. A New York Daily News reporter remarked, “The thoroughbred race horse is a genetic mistake. It runs too fast, its frame is too large, and its legs are far too small. As long as mankind demands that it run at high speeds under stressful conditions, horses will die at racetracks.”

 

Bullfighting

 


Bullfighting

is a traditional Latin American spectacle in which bulls bred to fight are tortured by armed men on horseback, then killed by a matador. Starved, beaten, isolated, and drugged before the “fight,” the bull is so debilitated that he cannot defend himself. After being stabbed, speared, and harpooned, the suffering animal is killed.

 

 

 Cockfighting

The Fight
“Gamecocks” are specifically bred to fight. Their natural spurs are sawed off, and steel blades called “gaffs” are fitted to their legs. They are placed in a small, enclosed space from which they cannot escape. They are often not permitted to stop fighting until one (or both) of the animals die. The winning birds often have many injuries, including broken bones and gauged out eyes. Large cockfighting pits kill up to 1,000 birds in one weekend.

 

Greyhound Racing

The greyhound racing industry over breeds dogs in an attempt to produce champions. Only about 30% of the newborns will ever become racers; 20,000-28,000 surplus greyhounds are destroyed each year.

 

 

Fishing

THE CATCH
The commercial fishing industry catches fish in the following ways:

Drift nets are nylon nets that hang suspended in the water for miles. Fish become trapped by their gills, as do other marine animals who, unable to reach the surface, drown.

Trawlers drag gigantic nets through the water, forcing fish into the closed end and vacuuming up sea life. The fish remain in the nets for hours, thrown against the rocks and debris that were also caught by the trawler. This rough, bumpy contact with inanimate objects and other fish sometimes files away the fishes’ scales. In the process, trawlers dump thousands of plastic containers and millions of pounds of packing material and plastic fishing net into the ocean.

Bottom Trawls are bag-shaped nets trawled over the seabed to catch fish living at the bottom of the ocean. The nets inadvertently catch all of the other species dwelling on the sea floor as well as the plants, therein destroying the habitat and sediment. 

Purse seine consists of a net drawn up and closed like a bag; it is typically pulled behind a boat. Many dolphins have been caught and drown by fisherman purse seining for yellowfin tuna.

During long-lining, a ship unreels many miles of fishing line with thousands of razor sharp baited hooks. The hooks are later ripped out of the fish’s mouths, which contain numerous pain receptors.

Fishers may also employ electronic equipment and satellite communications to track fish.

Death
The intense pressure of decompression that the fish experience when dragged from the deep ruptures their swim bladder, pops out their eyes, and pushes their esophagus and stomach out through their mouth. Smaller fish like flounder are typically dumped onto chopped ice; most suffocate or are crushed to death by the fish thrown on top of them. Others are gutted alive. Those better able to survive out of water may be filleted alive.


 


Hunting

The Effect on Animals
Sport hunting and the noise, fear, and predation associated with it causes great stress to all animals. It hampers their ability to find and store enough food to sustain them through the winter. Moreover, hunting has profound effects on animals such as wolves who have tight-knit family units and mate for life. Finally, many farm and companion animals are wounded and killed by hunters, especially intoxicated ones.

Some wildlife agencies set hunting seasons on some animals during the time that they give birth to and nurse their offspring. As a result, mothers are often killed while searching for food for their young. The defenseless children then die of starvation or are killed by predators.

Types of Weapons Used by Hunters

  • Rifles
  • Shotguns
  • Handguns
  • Muzzleloaders
  • Bows and arrows 

 

Ethics
Hunting is an inherently unfair “sport.” While the hunter has a powerful weapon at his disposal, the animal is unarmed and helpless. Moreover, the vast majority of hunters kill not for food but as recreation. Most target species, squirrels and raccoons for instance, provide little sustenance. Additionally, when the costs of acquiring license fees, equipment, transportation and the like are considered, hunting expenses generally outweigh the money that it might save.

Trophy hunters sometimes engage in baiting, during which they dump piles of rotten food on public lands. They then shoot hungry deer or bears that come to feed on it. Trophy hunters also practice hounding; they put radio-collars on their dogs, who chase animals up trees. The hunters then follow the radio signal and shoot the trapped animal off of the tree branch. Others use global positioning satellite systems. Bow hunting cripples approximately 50% of struck animals. They then bleed to death or die from infection or disease. During contest kills, contestants compete to see who can kill the most animals while onlookers cheer; prairie dogs and pigeons are among the most popular targets of such hunts.

Canned Hunts: “No Kill, No Pay”
The wealthy pay to kill exotic and native animals at fenced in hunting facilities. Animals used in canned hunts are either purchased from animal dealers, bred in captivity, or are former zoo and circus animals. Because baby animals are more popular, zoos often sell adults to canned hunt facilities or dealers who will later sell the animals to such facilities. The animals are often so tame and accustomed to humans that they do not run when approached by hunters. These captive animals are then shot or struck by hunters who typically wound the animals many times in the body so as not to spoil the “trophy” head of their kill. As a result, the animals die slow, painful deaths.

Types of Animals Commonly Killed in Canned Hunts

  • Lion
  • Boar
  • Buffalo
  • Ram
  • Antelope
  • Elk
  • Rhinoceros

Non-Native Species
Hunters sometimes shoot species such as ring-necked peasants who are raised in pens and socialized by humans. Just before hunting season, these species are released in the wild. Those that are not killed by hunters will die of starvation and exposure, as they are unable to survive in a nonnative environment.

'What is it but deliberate massacre when tens of thousands of tame, hand reared creatures are every year literally driven into the jaws of death and mown down in a peculiarly brutal manner? A perfect roar of guns fills the air; louder tap and yell the beaters, while above the din can be heard the heart-rending cries of wounded hares and rabbits, some of which can be seen dragging themselves away, with legs broken, or turning round and round in their agony before they die! And the pheasants! They are on every side, some rising, some dropping; some lying dead, but the great majority fluttering on the ground wounded; some with both wings broken and a leg; others merely winged, running to hide; others mortally wounded, gasping out their last breath amidst the hellish uproar which surrounds them. And this is called “sport!” '
-Florence Dixie 


The Effect on Animal Populations
Contrary to their claims, hunters do not kill animals that would otherwise starve to death. Instead, they hunt either at random or by focusing on killing those animals with the biggest antlers, i.e. those that would make the best “trophies.” In doing so, they kill the strongest members of the population, thereby interfering with natural selection and weakening the population as a whole.

Hunters manipulate animals’ habitat by burning and bulldozing forests to increase the food supply for target species, at the expense of non-target species.  Hunting programs also cause wildlife overpopulation by maintaining “buck only” hunts, which result in a disproportionate number of does, and also by annihilating predators to increase the number of prey. Lastly, hunters move some animals such as raccoons and antelopes to other states to increase the amount of “game” in the latter, therein disturbing the ecosystems of both states.

Endangered Species
1973’s Endangered Species Act was created largely as a result of the animal extinction caused by hunting. Hunters continue to kill endangered animals or those on the brink of endangerment, sometimes because they are unable to properly identify exactly which species of animal they are killing. This inability is most serious before sunrise, when the hunting day begins.

 

 

 

 









Write to Organsiations, Politicians  to close all Zoos, Animal Circuses, Marine Parks, Rodeos and release Animals to sanctuaries.


Sample Letter:

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen,


i am writing to express my condemnation about
Millions of animals suffer for human entertainment in zoos, circuses, marine parks, rodeos  and for tourists’ photos. 


In the case of animal attacks and escapes from zoos, circuses, and marine parks, official explanations are almost always at odds with the historical record. This is hardly surprising.


Circus animals often suffer from inadequate care. They spend most of their lives in small, dirty cages, released only to perform. Many circus animals are leased seasonably from dealers; they thus go from one circus to another, providing little incentive for circus owners to keep them healthy. Their access to food and water is thus limited, and they are provided with insufficient veterinary care. Circus animals cannot socialize with other members of their species. They are typically “cared for” by seasonal or temporary circus workers who have little or no experience caring for exotic animals.


Animals in zoos are forced to live in artificial, stressful, and downright boring conditions. Removed from their natural habitats and social structures, they are confined to small, restrictive environments that deprive them of mental and physical stimulation. While zoos claim to provide conservation, education, and entertainment, their primary goal is to sustain public support in order to increase profits.


Marine parks are like prisons to marine mammals. While whales and dolphins travel constantly 35 to 100 miles each day marine park tanks are sometimes as small as 24 by 24 feet wide and 6 feet deep. Animals can swim only a few strokes before hitting a wall. Thus they are forced to swim in circles.
In the wild, marine mammals are perpetually stimulated by their environment. In captivity, they have only manufactured seaweed. They cannot engage in their natural behaviors nor interact with members of their social group, for it is virtually impossible for captive marine mammals to maintain a family unit. They cannot act on their basic instincts. As a result, many engage in stereotypic behaviors, becoming abnormally aggressive, bored, or depressed.

In the wild, dolphins use echolocation to navigate, bouncing sonar waves off of other objects. In tanks, these sonar waves bounce off the walls, driving some dolphins insane. In spite of this, marine parks oppose efforts to release captive marine mammals back into the wild.

Rodeo animals are generally tame creatures who must be provoked into battle. They live lives filled with stress and fear. Contestants practice their games on numerous calves, bulls, and so forth, therein injuring and killing many animals before even entering the ring. A contestant's score is based on how long he can ride a struggling animal or how quickly he can overpower an animal. Sprains, broken bones, muscle pulls, saddle blisters, spur wounds, flank strap wounds, punctured lungs, broken ribs, hematomas, bruising, and broken necks are common. Wounded animals are quickly removed while the rodeo announcer distracts the public. The animals that become too injured to participate are sent to slaughter.


Animals are not Entertainers!
I urge you to close all Zoos, Marine Parks, Animal Circuses, Rodeos. and release Animals to Sanctuaries .



Sincerely,




Write to President Obama:

Webform:http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/submit-questions-and-comments

 

 

AMPTO:

http://www.ampto.com.au/
email. info@ampto.com.au

 

Verband deutscher Zoodirektoren:

email: office@zoodirektoren.de

 



WAZA
WAZA is
the unifying
organisation for
the world zoo &
aquarium community
http://www.waza.org/en/site/home
Email. secretariat@waza.org.


Marine Connection

info@marineconnection.org




USDA
agsec@usda.gov


Prime Minister Harper canada
pm@pm.gc.ca


Angela Merkel, Germany
info@cdu.de



european union:

soren.nielsen@eea.europa.eu,

 

 

Zoo Cologne, Germany:

info@koelnerzoo.de,

 



Horse Federation:

fli@fli.org




Embassy:
press@chinese-embassy.org.uk,

 

 

 SeaWorld Communications Department
7007 SeaWorld Drive
Orlando, FL 32821
Phone: 407.363.2280
Email: SWF.PR@SeaWorld.com

 

Take Action:

Visited a zoo or circus? Not happy with what you've seen? Whether in UK or overseas, you can take positive action. By sending us details of what you have seen, we can advise you on how best to approach the relevant authorities.

Do you have information on zoological collections, circuses, dolphinaria, individual caged animals, animals used as photographic props, magic shows with animals or any other form of wild animal exploitation?

We want to hear from YOU and together we can make a difference!

It is vital that the information you send us about your experience includes all the necessary facts. Describing cages as ‘small’ and animal conditions as ‘terrible’ will not provide enough information to encourage relevant authorities to take action.

Photographs or video footage is a superb way of providing proper 'evidence'. This is the information we need:

1. Take a photographic record, either stills or film, this kind of evidence is so useful!

2. Collect as much information as you can:

  • Which animals are involved? How many? Describe their condition.
  • What does the 'entertainment' consist of? Is direct contact involved?
  • Who are the people or company behind the exploitation?
  • Is the event or establishment advertised or promoted?
  • Who is involved in this promotion? (eg hotels, holiday reps etc)
  • Is there literature you can collect? (eg leaflets, brochures etc)
  • Who are the main audience or visitors?
  • What other details can you note? (eg size of enclosures, any enrichment etc)

 3. Report what you have seen:

  • Explain your concern to your tour representative, operator and/or your hotel, and send a follow-up letter.
  • Also fill in a complaints formand send us the details.
  • If you are about to visit a zoo, circus etc. check out the further information below and download our checklist - PDF 46KB
  • In addition to informing the Born Free Foundation about animal neglect, suffering and cruelty, please also inform your tour operator who is obliged to investigate your claims. This will also ensure that animal welfare remains an important issue on their agenda.

What happens to my report?

Each report received by the Born Free Foundation is reviewed by our dedicated team and logged onto a database to be used for further analysis.

Born Free will respond, in writing, to the complainant providing information on how they can take the matter further.  In addition, dependent upon the detail provided in the report, Born Free will write to the relevant authorities and/or the captive establishment to try and address the concerns of the complainant. Feedback will be provided when appropriate.

Born Free regularly receives calls for help in regard to captive animals in need. Sadly, there are many more animals in need of rescue than there are sanctuary spaces worldwide - it is therefore vital we use precious sanctuary spaces not only to rescue animals in need, but also to highlight the problems facing captive wildlife (e.g. private ownership, trade, substandard zoos etc.). Please view this flowchart which outlines the type of considerations Born Free makes when we receive information about animals in need from our supporters. 

Based on the reports we receive, we are able to identify ‘hot spots’ and can focus targeted campaign activities on the most urgent areas. 

Born Free also works closely with the travel industry and other wildlife organisations around the world to tackle travellers’ concerns about animal exploitation in the wild or captivity.

http://www.bornfree.org.uk/campaigns/zoo-check/travellers-animal-alert/take-action/

 

Take action: Challenge the Dolphinaria Industry:

http://www.bornfree.org.uk/get-involved/campaigning/petitions/dolphinaria-petition/

 

 

JAPAN DOLPHIN DRIVES & THE GLOBAL DOLPHINARIA INDUSTRY

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/3/stop-the-dolphin-slaughter/

 

You Tube: remove clips of captive slow lorises

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/318/--if-gte-mso-9xml-wworddocument-wviewnormalwview-wzoom0wzoom-wpunctuationkerning/

 

 

 

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Recent signatures

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    1. Reached 10,000 signatures

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    Reasons for signing

    • karin schreiber GERMANY
      • 8 days ago

      weil es Tierquälerrei ist .Tiere gehören in die Freiheit und nicht in ein Becken oder Zoos

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
      • 22 days ago

      SCHÜTZT diese wunderbaren Tier <3

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Edyta Stec GERMANY
      • 23 days ago

      Eigentlich ist die Begründung überflüssig... Das mittelalter ist vorbei und der ach so intelligente Mensch hat sooo viele Unterhaltungsmöglichkeiten!!!

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Dörthe Ehlers GERMANY
      • 24 days ago

      Tierquälerei

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Tanja Heyer HAUZENBERG, GERMANY
      • 27 days ago

      Hört bitte endlich auf die armen Tiere zu quälen und zu töten,es sind Lebewesen und haben ein Recht auf ein schönes Leben,Tiere haben auch Gefühle und Schmerzen.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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