The Hon. Bob Carr, Minister for Foreign Affairs, senator.b.carr@aph.gov.au: Act on Uganda's 'Kill the Gays Bill'
  • Petitioned The Hon. Bob Carr

This petition was delivered to:

Minister for Foreign Affairs
The Hon. Bob Carr
Minister for Trade
The Hon. Craig Emerson

The Hon. Bob Carr, Minister for Foreign Affairs, senator.b.carr@aph.gov.au: Act on Uganda's 'Kill the Gays Bill'

    1. LUKE MANSILLO
    2. Petition by

      LUKE MANSILLO

      Acton, Australia

The African nation of Uganda’s Parliament is set to enact new harsh penalties for certain types of homosexual acts. The Speaker of the Ugandan Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga, said it was a “Christmas present” for Ugandans.
The legislation proposes that gay men and lesbians be sentenced to life imprisonment for having sex, and those more ‘extreme’ cases of ‘aggravated homosexuality’, which includes repeat offenders, may face the death penalty if convicted.
Severely punishing certain kinds of consensual sexual ‘offences’ between people of the same-sex is homophobic and should be condemned.
On the 23rd March 2010, Canada, New Zealand and Australia made a joint statement to United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva. It stated:
“Canada, New Zealand and Australia are deeply concerned by the continuing violations all over the world of human rights and fundamental freedoms based on sexual orientation or gender identity, as well as the violence, harassment, discrimination, exclusion, stigmatisation and prejudice directed against persons because of sexual orientation or gender identity. In this regard, we are especially concerned that legislation under consideration in Uganda could provide for life imprisonment and even the death penalty for homosexuality in some cases.
At this session of the Council alone, Special Rapporteurs have identified numerous human rights violations on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity, including arrests, killings, violent attacks, violations of freedoms of expression, and torture.”
...
This Council’s mandate is to promote “universal respect for the protection of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of any kind and in a fair and equal manner”.
Canada, New Zealand and Australia therefore call upon Members of this Council and all states to promote and protect the human rights of all persons, regardless of their sexual orientation and gender identify. Sexual orientation or gender identity must never be the basis for discrimination, abuse, criminal action and penalties, detention or imprisonment, or deprivation of any human right.”

As Canada, New Zealand and Australia have clearly supported the protection of human rights for LGBT identifying people and have expressed deep concerns in the particular case of Uganda we call on the Australian Government to act on its concerns to seek change in the condition within Uganda and protect those discriminated against in Uganda.
Specifically for the Australian Government to:
(1) Accept all LGBT identifying Ugandans whom seek asylum.
(2) Expel Uganda from the Commonwealth.
(3) Bring about diplomatic, economic and cultural isolation of Uganda through trade and finance embargoes/economic sanctions, the banning of state sponsored bilateral cultural activities, the reduction of diplomatic ties such as the removal of the Ugandan High Commission in Canberra, the Acting High Commissioner for Uganda, Mr Enoch Nkuruko, and refuse visas to all Ministers of State to enter Australia.
(4) Call upon all states to help in the effort to protect human rights in Uganda on the basis that “Sexual orientation or gender identity must never be the basis for discrimination, abuse, criminal action and penalties, detention or imprisonment, or deprivation of any human right.” Multilateral action is essential.
By accepting all LGBT identifying Ugandans whom seek asylum the Australian Government can protect those individuals whom suffer oppression caused by the proposed legislation.
By expelling Uganda from the Commonwealth it would provide an example of international disapproval for Uganda’s human rights record.
By bring about diplomatic, economic and cultural isolation of Uganda, Australia will express its disapproval of Uganda’s human rights record, and coerce the country to abide by its human rights obligations.
By calling upon all states to help in the effort to protect human rights in Uganda on the basis that “Sexual orientation or gender identity must never be the basis for discrimination, abuse, criminal action and penalties, detention or imprisonment, or deprivation of any human right” to legitimise international action to prevent sexual identification persecution as a valid justification for state responsiveness.

Sources:

http://www.samesame.com.au/news/international/9141/Ugandas-anti-gay-bill-could-pass-this-year.htm

http://www.salon.com/2011/10/29/gay_africans_flee_persecution/

http://www.geneva.mission.gov.au/gene/statement98.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-20318436

For more infomation: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZh1AVkS2ys

To:
The Hon. Bob Carr, Minister for Foreign Affairs
The Hon. Craig Emerson, Minister for Trade
Act on Uganda's 'Kill the Gays Bill'

Sincerely,
[Your name]

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    • Anita Kanitz STUTTGART, GERMANY
      • 10 months ago

      Lesbian and gay rights are human rights!

      Back in December 2011,the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights published a landmark report identifying that violence against LGBT people “tends to be especially vicious compared to other bias-motivated crimes.” It said that states have an “obligation to exercise due diligence” to investigate and prosecute such crimes.

      Thailand is a country often assumed to be LGBT friendly because of the tolerance that is part of Thai Buddhism, but human rights advocates are protesting a pattern of killings of lesbians and ‘tomboys.’ ‘Tom’ is a specifically Thai gender identity where lesbian women dress, act and speak in a masculine fashion.

      Most of the killings have been dismissed by police as “love gone sour” or the fault of the victims.

      They have verified information in 15 murder cases over the last few years, the youngest of whom was 17. In addition to being stabbed multiple times, suffocated, strangled, or shot to death, many of the lesbians and toms had also been raped. In two cases of double homicides, lesbian couples were killed by men who objected to their relationship and felt rebuffed when their attempts at coercing one partner into a heterosexual relationship failed.

      24-year-old Nurisan Chedurame was described as a tomboy by those who knew her and in the media. Last December, she was found dead near her village’s garbage dump with her head smashed in. A three-inch club was found at the crime scene. Relatives said that Nurisan had not returned from being out with friends the night before. Thai media quote police as suspecting she was killed because “she was involved with women.”

      Also in December, the body of 25-year-old tomboy Kanchana Changkwian was found two months after she went missing. In that case, police speculated that she had been raped and murdered “for becoming involved with a married woman.”

      In another case from last year a ‘tom’ (who is not named in reports) was murdered by her girlfriend’s ex-boyfriend. Parents and relatives of the girlfriend (also not named) had opposed the relationship, and despite threats against the tom, had failed to stop the couple from continuing to see each other. The mother of the girlfriend engineered the murder of the tom and promised to marry off her daughter to the ex-boyfriend who committed the murder.

      Most of the verified cases have not been properly investigated because of a failure to recognize possible hate crime motives.

      Said Grace Poore, of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC):

      “The killing and rapes of lesbians and toms represents a callous disregard for humanity. The failure of the Thai government to prevent or properly investigate these killings are not only appalling, they are evidence of poor governance and blatant violation of international human rights law.”

      IGLHRC and Human Rights Watch (HRW) have written to the Thai government demanding that this pattern of killings be investigated. The letter also makes a series of recommendations that authorities work with local human rights groups to ensure that LGBT people enjoy the protections they have under Thai law and that they educate both law enforcement and the Thai public about those protections.

      Thailand has signed a number of international treaties that guarantee respect for human rights, and it was one of the countries which supported the process at the United Nations, led by South Africa, which has resulted in the High Commissioner for Human Rights’ report.

      Australian police have released a shocking X-ray photo showing the skull of a murdered Chinese immigrant shot 34 times in the head and neck with a high-power nail gun.

      The body of gay Chen Liu, 27, was found 2008 by two children in marshland in south Sydney, wrapped in a carpet and bound with electrical wire.Detectives said the weapon used was a standard gas nail gun widely available and used in construction, firing nails up to 85mm (3.3 inches) long.

      “In 36 years, I’ve never seen a murder of this nature,” Homicide Squad Superintendent Geoff Beresford said.

      “It’s a particularly brutal and vicious murder and hence the reason we are seeking information from the public.”

      Liu arrived in Australia in 2000 and was reported missing last year.

      Police appealed to the public for help in solving the gruesome killing of a Chinese man who was shot 34 times in the head and neck with a nail gun before being dumped in a river.

      Police have yet to say whether they’ve identified any suspects.

      The 34 nails were found during a post-mortem examination of Liu’s body, and were located mainly in his skull. They were fired from an 85 mm nail gun at close range, Beresford said. Police have not recovered the weapon.

      “We certainly believe the nail gun is responsible for the death – there’s no doubt about that,” he said.

      Police believe he was killed 12 days before his corpse was discovered.

      Police are investigating associates of Liu, who also went by the name Anthony Liu, but said they have no evidence to suggest he was linked to any criminal group. They refused to say whether they’ve identified any suspects or persons of interest.

      Liu arrived in the city of Melbourne on a student visa from China in early 2000 and moved to Sydney, where he married for a short time and separated, police said. They declined to release any additional information about him, including whether any of his family members are living in Australia.

      “In 36 years, I’ve never seen a murder of this nature,” Homicide Squad Superintendent Geoff Beresford said.

      “It’s a particularly brutal and vicious murder and hence the reason we are seeking information from the public.”

      Liu arrived in Australia in 2000 and was reported missing last year.

      Police appealed to the public for help in solving the gruesome killing of a Chinese man who was shot 34 times in the head and neck with a nail gun before being dumped in a river.

      Police have yet to say whether they’ve identified any suspects.

      The 34 nails were found during a post-mortem examination of Liu’s body, and were located mainly in his skull. They were fired from an 85 mm nail gun at close range, Beresford said. Police have not recovered the weapon.

      “We certainly believe the nail gun is responsible for the death – there’s no doubt about that,” he said.

      Police believe he was killed 12 days before his corpse was discovered.

      Police are investigating associates of Liu, who also went by the name Anthony Liu, but said they have no evidence to suggest he was linked to any criminal group. They refused to say whether they’ve identified any suspects or persons of interest.

      Liu arrived in the city of Melbourne on a student visa from China in early 2000 and moved to Sydney, where he married for a short time and separated, police said. They declined to release any additional information about him, including whether any of his family members are living in Australia.

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    • Alex Segal WAGGA WAGGA NSW, AUSTRALIA
      • almost 2 years ago

      Australia should condemn this abuse of human rights.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Mark Chappell NUNDAH, AUSTRALIA
      • almost 2 years ago

      It seems like Uganda is taking a step back into the dark ages, and with views like this in some countries there will be those in this country who think it's ok have laws like this on our books.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Phil Browne TENERIFFE, AUSTRALIA
      • almost 2 years ago

      This is disgusting - Australia must intervene.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Lionell Pack LOGAN CITY, AUSTRALIA
      • almost 2 years ago

      The bill is a gross violation of human rights, and Uganda must face severe penalties if they sign it into law. The modern world has no room for this sort of thing.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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