Stop Chie's and Kawah's Deportation
  • Petitioned Chie's and Kawah's Deportation

This petition was delivered to:

Chie's and Kawah's Deportation
California Governor
California State Senate
California State House

Stop Chie's and Kawah's Deportation

    1. Kazumi Drexel
    2. Petition by

      Kazumi Drexel

      Sacramento, CA

Mr. Yu was born in the People’s Republic of China and later moved to Colombia with his wife. While there, Mr. Yu and his wife had two children, Chie(19) and Kawah(15). In addition, he and his family were the victims of harm and persecution including multiple robberies and kidnappings of their children for ransom money. Because they could no longer stand the harm, they came to the United States in January 2002 and applied for political asylum. Although the judge believed that they suffered tremendous harm in Colombia and faced the possibility of harm if they returned to China, the judge found that they did not fit within the categories listed in the immigration laws such that they could be granted relief and remain in the United States. The Yu family appealed the decision of the judge all the way to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. That Court remanded the case back to the Immigration Judge, who denied again. They appealed all the way back to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and lost their case. The family is now awaiting deportation.
Since Mr. and Mrs. Yu were never citizens of Colombia, they cannot return there. The children will be removed to Colombia but they cannot enter China without applying for a visa to China. Essentially, the family will be split for a period of time. If the children go to China, the parents could face possible harm because they have violated China's One-Child Policy by having 2 children.
The children have spent the bulk of their lives here in the US and really know no other way of life. No members of the Yu family have committed any crimes. Moreover, the elder son graduated as valedictorian from the School of Engineering and Sciences in the Sacramento City Unified School District and has received awards for his ability in math and science. The younger son is a straight A student and is going to the School of Engineering and Sciences as well.
In an interview with Chie Hong Yee, he expressed an interest in devoting his talents to advance the state of computing technology and in the mass electronics market. The family has received over a dozen support letters from the community testifying to the exemplary perseverance, integrity, and industry of family members. Deporting the brothers would hurt their plans for the future and their careers. The parents are law-abiding citizens and pay their taxes every year. It would be a great injustice to deport them.

Recent signatures

    News

    1. Reached 200 signatures

    Supporters

    Reasons for signing

    • Sarah Hughes SACRAMENTO, CA
      • over 2 years ago

      Kawah is an exemplary student, and i truly see no legitimate reason to deport him along with his family. I believe whole heartedly that deporting their family will not only hurt them, but it will negatively effect the community they are a part of as well.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Kiana Davis SACRAMENTO, CA
      • over 2 years ago

      Kawah is always the top student in any class (He's a classmate). He tries his best in whatever he does. He deserves to stay in America because he is a wonderful role model along with his brother.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • freyttsie pineda SAN JOSE, CA
      • over 2 years ago

      It isn't right.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Christy Lor APPLETON, WI
      • over 2 years ago

      B/c i wanna support them!

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Millie Khou SAN CARLOS, CA
      • over 2 years ago

      To be honest, coming from someone young, it's just wrong to ruin someone's future because of how they were born, or where they came from. They earned something good, after working so hard. It's just cruel to send them out, especially if there was no harm done to anyone, besides them.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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