Limit cosmetic laser surgery to Medical Professionals ONLY!
  • Petitioned Representative Mike Sparks

This petition was delivered to:

Representative Mike Sparks
Tennessee General Assembly
Senator JIm Tracy

Limit cosmetic laser surgery to Medical Professionals ONLY!

    1. Zane Carroll
    2. Petition by

      Zane Carroll

      LaVergne, TN

THANK YOU TO SENATOR JIM TRACY AND REP. MIKE SPARKS FOR WORKING SO HARD ON THIS ISSUE.    video of Senate hearing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkAR0ySgQGw

My wifes life has been destroyed, she was injured at the age of 37 and will live with pain from nerve damage for the rest of her life due to an aesthetician using cosmetic lasers. The spa sent her home swollen just as you see her in the center photo above. She was having trouble breathing and her eyes had already been damaged. The careless and reckless behavior of these facilities has already cost lives in other states!

Story in the Tennessean http://www.tennessean.com/article/20120507/NEWS07/305070034/Lack-regulation-raises-medical-spa-safety-issues

PLEASE HELP US STOP THESE INJURIES.

PLEASE GO HERE TO SEE OTHER VICTIMS PHOTOS AND INFORMATION https://www.facebook.com/pages/PUBLIC-WARNING-ON-COSMETIC-LASERS/108499625860648

Medical spas have grown into a multi-billion dollar industry during the last 10 years. Are they safe? Who is regulating them?

Many have jumped at the opportunity to enter this lucrative field.

Some salons and spas in Tennessee are offering Cosmetic Laser Surgery and using injectables which are the Practice of Medicine. Medical procedures at a salon?  Massage and facelift in one stop? 

What medical education does a Hair stylist , Cosmetologist or Aesthetician have that would allow them to use medical/surgical equipment? The answer of course is NONE unless they can show you a medical degree.

They have no medical background what so ever and Tennssee does not license these procedures, so if you are told " I am a licensed laser tech" ask where the license came from. 

Aestheticians are PROHIBITED from performing these procedures by the Cosmetology Board Rules which state - Skin removal techniques and practices which affect the living layers of facial skin, known as the dermis, are prohibited. refer to TCA  rule 0440-2-16   Bottom of page 7   http://www.tn.gov/sos/rules/0440/0440-02.pdf

It isn't a JOKE.....and many have paid the price, some have sustained 2nd and 3rd degree burns, nerve damage, eye damage and some have paid with their life.

THIS PETITION ASKS THAT THESE SURGICAL DEVICES BE LIMITED TO MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS ONLY.  SOME STATES HAVE LIMITED THEM TO PHYSICIANS IN THEIR SCOPE OF PRACTICE SUCH AS PLASTIC SURGEONS AND DERMATOLOGIST. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE THIS PROVIDED FOR TENNESSEE PLEASE LEAVE YOUR OPINION IN THE COMMENT BOX!

If you have been injured in one of these facilites please contact us at cosmeticlaserinjury@comcast.net

Shiri Berg's Story:

On December 28, 2004, the 22-year-old college student planned to head to Premier Body Laser and Skin Clinic in Raleigh, NC, for laser hair removal. At home, she covered herself with a numbing gel the clinic had sold her to prepare her skin. But as she drove to the medical spa, Berg had a seizure. She soon lapsed into a coma and died 8 days later.

An autopsy concluded that Berg had suffered lethal brain damage from an overdose of the numbing gel, a potent combination of lidocaine, tetracaine, and phenylephrine. Under North Carolina law, doctors are supposed to take a medical history or perform a physical exam before writing any prescriptions. Premier had no doctors on site, yet the staff routinely dispensed the gel, which is safe only on small patches of skin.


Read more: http://www.prevention.com/beauty/beauty/medical-spa-risks#ixzz1tFtkRaeM

APPROXIMATELY 8 STATES HAVE YET TO RESTRICT THESE PROCEDURES AND TENNESSEE IS ONE OF THEM.  However, Senator Jim Tracy and Rep. Mike Sparks among others in the TN General Assembly are working hard on this issue now.

LOOK AT WHAT CALIFORNIA HAS DONE

Medi-spa industry California

Alternative patient treatment sites, often called "medi-spas," have become a major, and

often misleading, presence in the medical cosmetic skin care field - a phenomenon witnesses

before the Board regularly referred to as an "industry" serving "clients." They may be

freestanding locations, or are routinely located in potential high-volume locales such as shopping

malls or centers.

"Medical spas are marketing vehicles for medical procedures. If they are offering

medical procedures, they must be owned by physicians. The use of the term 'medical spa' is for

advertising purposes to make the procedures seem more appealing. In reality, however, it is the

practice of medicine.

The Medical Board, however, is concerned when medicine is being marketed like a

pedicure, and consumers are led to believe that being injected, lasered, and resurfaced requires

no more thought than changing hair color.

Medical treatments should be performed by medical professionals only. There is risk to

any procedure, however minor, and consumers should be aware of those risks. While it is illegal

for unlicensed personnel to provide these types of treatments, consumers should be aware that

some persons and firms are operating illegally. Cosmetologists, while licensed professionals and

highly qualified in superficial treatments such as facials and microdermabrasion, may never

inject the skin, use lasers, or perform medical-level dermabrasion or skin peels. Those types of

treatments must be performed by qualified medical personnel.

 

link to full article -

http://www.medbd.ca.gov/board/meetings/materials_2008_04-24_fullboard-6.pdf

 

OTHER RESOURCES and SUPPORT GROUP: IPL AND LASER DAMAGE SUPPORT and PUBLIC WARNING ON COSMETIC LASERS

 

Recent signatures

    News

    1. Reached 50 signatures
    2. How to find your representative

      Zane Carroll
      Petition Organizer

      You can also email or call your senator and representative to voice your concern.

    3. Reached 5 signatures

    Supporters

    Reasons for signing

    • Anita Kanitz STUTTGART, GERMANY
      • 10 months ago

      The risk of dying in any surgical procedure is between 1 in 250,000 and 1 in 500,000. This is similar to the risk of dying in a plane crash. In contrast, the chance of being involved in a fatal car accident was estimated at 1 in 2,000 in a study of the California highway system, and 1 in 5,000 nationwide.

      Certain procedures are more risky than others. Certainly, the risk of death during eyelid surgery is much lower than the 1 in 50,000 risk of dying during liposuction. In a study of twenty-three office surgery deaths in Florida between January 2000 and May 2004, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons found that the death rate was about 1 in 16,000 procedures overall. An interesting statistic emerges when this information is critically analyzed: the death rate for non-board-certified plastic surgeons, and other doctors such as dermatologists, was 1 in about 11,000 procedures; the death rate was three times lower, about 1 in 35,000, in patients operated on by board-certified plastic surgeons.

      ung mothers, middle-aged men and grandparents. All were among at least 32 people who died in Florida in the past decade in the pursuit of beauty – soon after cosmetic surgery.

      That's about the same number of deaths that occurred in the 1990s, leading the state Board of Medicine to pass rules restricting cosmetic procedures performed in doctors' offices – rules still considered among the toughest in the nation.

      One reason for the continued deaths may be a huge growth in cosmetic surgeries, but some surgeons, malpractice attorneys and industry experts say problems persist, and the state needs to do more.

      "If there are that many deaths, there's still something very wrong," said Becky Cherney, an Orlando health care advocate who was a member of the medical board that passed the rules. "People elect to have plastic surgery and they end up dying? It's a senseless loss of life."

      The deceased include four South Florida mothers in their 30s who went under the knife in the past two years to have love handles and bra rolls shrunk via liposuction, state incident reports and police records show.

      In one case, a 32-year-old Miami mother of six went for liposuction at a Broward County plastic surgery office in February 2010. She died the next afternoon from a toxic mix of the surgical anesthetic lidocaine and oxycodone pain pills "complicating elective cosmetic surgery,'' according to an autopsy report.

      Dr. Brett Coldiron, a University of Cincinnati dermatology surgeon who has researched plastic surgery in Florida, tallied 26 deaths and 131 hospitalizations from 2000 through 2009. The Sun Sentinel documented six deaths since then, through autopsy and police reports.

      The deaths have had various causes, including poor medical care by doctors, bad reactions to anesthesia, and heart and breathing emergencies during surgery. Some were due to unavoidable complications that can happen in any type of surgery, even under the best conditions. The causes of the two most recent deaths have not been determined.

      Florida's medical board tracks cosmetic surgery deaths and complications, but so far has not identified any trends or patterns that would require a change in the rules, said two board members from Fort Lauderdale, Dr. Zachariah P. Zachariah and Dr. Nabil El Sanadi. The medical board enforces laws involving physicians.

      Both said the board should take another look at the issue, based on a cluster of five deaths in the past 21 months in Broward County.

      "It's easy to second guess, but there needs to be a systematic approach to looking at all this," El Sanadi said. "Is it one place not complying with laws, or is it the system letting us down?... We don't know.''

      The medical board first addressed the dangers of plastic surgery in 1999, after a series by the Sun Sentinel that found 34 deaths in the preceding 12 years. Some were blamed on lengthy surgeries involving multiple procedures at doctors' offices that were not then being regulated.

      The board wrangled for two years before imposing rules that included regular inspections of physician surgery offices, a ban on overnight stays, and limits on liposuction and lengthy operations.

      Since then, demand for elective cosmetic surgery has mushroomed nationally, fueled in part by public interest in celebrity surgeries and makeover shows on TV. The number of procedures nearly doubled since 2000 to an estimated 13.1 million last year, according to surveys of doctors done by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

      Appearance-conscious Florida has been in the forefront. The number of doctors' offices registered to perform surgery jumped from 285 in 2004 to more than 400 today, state figures show. Half of those are in South Florida, with about 50 each in Broward and Palm Beach counties, and 100 in Miami-Dade. Some doctors appeal to modest-income families by offering discounted prices and payment plans.

      Nationally, studies show a death rate of 2 per 100,000 cosmetic surgeries in physician offices. But no one counts the number of plastic surgery procedures in Florida so a statewide death rate cannot be calculated.

      Coldiron said the industry has gotten better, but "cosmetic surgery is still not as safe as it should be in Florida."

      Several malpractice attorneys said the state has not done enough to enforce the present rules and does not punish violators severely.

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    • Sonja Johnson SKOKIE, IL
      • 11 months ago

      I was damaged too! For two suffered with scars and damage...etc.I have depression now because of this

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    • Shannon Swayne OVERLAND PARK, KS
      • over 1 year ago

      We are regressing to the modern day "snake-oil" salespeople when we do away with licensing. How easily we forget our history.

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    • Vira Jane NASHVILLE, TN
      • almost 2 years ago

      Because it affects people lives!

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    • Hannah Steffy NASHVILLE, TN
      • almost 2 years ago

      I strongly agree this procedure requires medical certification for the health and well being of women in TN.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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