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Legalization of Marijuana
  • Petitioned Barack Obama and the United States Congress

This petition was delivered to:

Barack Obama and the United States Congress

Legalization of Marijuana

    1. Petition by

      Drew Kaplan

      Philadelphia, PA

For most of human history, marijuana has been completely legal. It’s not a recently discovered plant, and has been illegal for less than 1% of the time that it’s been in use. Its known uses go back further than 7,000 B.C. and it was legal as recently as when Ronald Reagan was a boy.

The marijuana (hemp) plant, of course, has an incredible number of uses. The earliest known woven fabric was apparently of hemp, and over the centuries the plant was used for food, incense, cloth, rope, and much more. This adds to some of the confusion over its introduction in the United States, as the plant was well known from the early 1600′s, but did not reach public awareness as a recreational drug until the early 1900′s.

America’s first marijuana law was enacted at Jamestown Colony, Virginia in 1619. It was a law “ordering” all farmers to grow Indian hempseed. There were several other “must grow” laws over the next 200 years (you could be jailed for not growing hemp during times of shortage in Virginia between 1763 and 1767), and during most of that time, hemp was legal tender (you could even pay your taxes with hemp — try that today!) Hemp was such a critical crop for a number of purposes (including essential war requirements – rope, etc.) that the government went out of its way to encourage growth.

The United States Census of 1850 counted 8,327 hemp “plantations” (minimum 2,000-acre farm) growing cannabis hemp for cloth, canvas and even the cordage used for baling cotton.

In the early 1900s, the western states developed significant tensions regarding the influx of Mexican-Americans. The revolution in Mexico in 1910 spilled over the border, with General Pershing’s army clashing with bandit Pancho Villa. Later in that decade, bad feelings developed between the small farmers in the west and the large farms that used cheaper Mexican labor. Then, the depression came and increased tensions, as jobs and welfare resources became scarce.

One of the “differences” seized upon during this time was the fact that many Mexicans smoked marijuana and had brought the plant with them, and it was through this that California apparently passed the first state marijuana law, outlawing “preparations of hemp, or loco weed.”

However, one of the first state laws outlawing marijuana may have been influenced, not just by Mexicans using the drug, but, oddly enough, because of Mormons using it. Mormons who traveled to Mexico in 1910 came back to Salt Lake City with marijuana. The church’s reaction to this may have contributed to the state’s marijuana law.

Other states quickly followed suit with marijuana prohibition laws, including Wyoming (1915), Texas (1919), Iowa (1923), Nevada (1923), Oregon (1923), Washington (1923), Arkansas (1923), and Nebraska (1927).

In 1930, a new division in the Treasury Department was established — the Federal Bureau of Narcotics — and Harry J. Anslinger was named director. This, if anything, marked the beginning of the all-out war against marijuana.

Anslinger was an extremely ambitious man, and he recognized the Bureau of Narcotics as an amazing career opportunity — a new government agency with the opportunity to define both the problem and the solution. He immediately realized that opiates and cocaine wouldn’t be enough to help build his agency, so he latched on to marijuana and started to work on making it illegal at the federal level.

Anslinger immediately drew upon the themes of racism and violence to draw national attention to the problem he wanted to create. He also promoted and frequently read from “Gore Files” —wild reefer-madness-style exploitation tales of ax murderers on marijuana and sex and… “Negroes”. Here are some quotes that have been widely attributed to Anslinger and his Gore Files:

“There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos, and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz, and swing, result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers, and any others.”

“…the primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effect on the degenerate races.”

“Marijuana is an addictive drug which produces in its users insanity, criminality, and death.”

“Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men.”

“Marihuana leads to pacifism and communist brainwashing”

“You smoke a joint and you’re likely to kill your brother.”

“Marijuana is the most violence-causing drug in the history of mankind.”

Anslinger received additional help from William Randolph Hearst, owner of a huge chain of newspapers. Hearst had lots of reasons to help. First, he hated Mexicans. Second, he had invested heavily in the timber industry to support his newspaper chain and didn’t want to see the development of hemp paper in competition. Third, he had lost 800,000 acres of timberland to Pancho Villa, so he hated Mexicans. Fourth, telling lurid lies about Mexicans (and the devil marijuana weed causing violence) sold newspapers, making him rich.

After two years of secret planning, Anslinger brought his plan, The Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, to Congress — complete with a scrapbook full of sensational Hearst editorials, stories of ax murderers who had supposedly smoked marijuana, and racial slurs. After remarkably short hearings in the Congress, marijuana was banned at the federal level. (The law text itself is available here. http://www.druglibrary.org/Schaffer/hemp/taxact/mjtaxact.htm; one of the Anti-Marijuana cards passed out is available here: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/Killerdrug.jpg)

Despite the history behind why it was banned and scientific evidence showing that marijuana causes less damage to the human system the alcohol, marijuana remains banned in the US. Some countries, Holland for example, have legalized marijuana and 12 states in the US have legalized "medical marijuana" but in many places in the US mere possession of marijuana brings a jail sentence of up to 10 years and a 5000 dollar fine.

Alcohol tears families apart and cigarettes cause lung cancer and emphysema, yet both are legal, but marijuana, which has much lower chances of getting people addicted and is IMPOSSIBLE to overdose on, is illegal. Neurotoxins that cause depression and abuse and little paper rolls that deposit toxins into peoples lungs and cut life expectancy by 13-14 years are perfectly legal, but a non-addictive drug with no risk of overdose is illegal. Unlike cigarettes and alcohol, marijuana also has specifically medical benefits, having been shown to help with ALS (i.e., Lou Gehrig's disease), Alzheimers, AIDS, and brain and breast cancer. For it to remain illegal even for medical purposes in most of the US is an outrage; the ban on it should be lifted.

Recent signatures

    News

    1. Reached 100 signatures

    Supporters

    Reasons for signing

    • donna kettler ELLWOOD, PA
      • 9 months ago

      I can't imagine withholding marijuana if it has less harsh side effects than traditional, invasive medications and surgeries when it has been proven to add to the quality of life. Why can't it be dispensed like any other regimen? I can't imagine being the parent of a child who has repeated seizures and severe injuries, knowing that in some cases marijuana has significantly reduced the seizures. Withholding something that would bring quality to life should be handled no differently than a parent not seeking help for an injured or sick child.

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    • Joseph Andersen SAN JOSE, CA
      • 11 months ago

      It would boost the economy, create two new highly profitable industries, benefit the environment in multiple ways, increase tourism, decrease organized and violent crime, and make people care less about nsa spying. Oh and the money generated can go to funding a better education system, or paying off our national debt.

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    • kevin bartel CELINA, TX
      • 12 months ago

      would be huge for the economy

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    • Brittany Ball LIMA, OH
      • over 1 year ago

      I personally use cannibas to deal with my anxiety and other things in my life, it does not inhibit me and i would really love to see this legalized.

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    • Raymond Martinez CAMPO, CA
      • over 1 year ago

      It was made illegal through lies!

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