Irish citizens abroad call for urgent X case legislation .
  • Petitioned The Irish Government

This petition was delivered to:

The Irish Government
Minister for Health
James Reilly
An Taoiseach
Enda Kenny

Irish citizens abroad call for urgent X case legislation .

    1. Louisa Ní Éideáin
    2. Petition by

      Louisa Ní Éideáin

      Geneva, Switzerland

We are Irish citizens, resident abroad. 

In light of the recent tragic loss of Savita Halappanavar, we demand that the government legislate for the X case as a matter of urgency. We must ensure that all women in Ireland have access to adequate reproductive healthcare. It is unacceptable that the right to an abortion is denied to a mother whose life is at risk. As Irish citizens, resident abroad, we are resolute that our voices should also be heard on this issue.

To:
The Irish Government
James Reilly, Minister for Health
Enda Kenny, An Taoiseach
As an Irish citizen, resident abroad, I call upon Dáil Éireann to make legislation for the X case a priority.

Sincerely,
[Your name]

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    1. Reached 100 signatures

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    Reasons for signing

    • Anita Kanitz STUTTGART, GERMANY
      • 11 months ago

      The Pope calls for sex without condom and that means in many cases for women and children Aids/HIV infection. How silly is that?An ex-tenant began to terrorize us because we have noticed that he is a drug addict and probably that he has AIDS. We think he didn't tell his girlfriends and his wife anything! He infected them deliberately with Aids.

      AIDS is a medical condition. A person is diagnosed with AIDS when their immune system is too weak to fight off infections.

      Since AIDS was first identified in the early 1980s, an unprecedented number of people have been affected by the global AIDS epidemic. Today, there are an estimated 34 million people living with HIV and AIDS worldwide.

      Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, shortened AIDS, is caused by HIV. Some people may refer to AIDS as advanced HIV infection.

      HIV is a virus that gradually attacks immune system cells. As HIV progressively damages these cells, the body becomes more vulnerable to infections, which it will have difficulty in fighting off. It is at the point of very advanced HIV infection that a person is said to have AIDS. If left untreated, it can take around ten years before HIV has damaged the immune system enough for AIDS to develop.

      A person is diagnosed with AIDS when they have developed an AIDS related condition or symptom, called an opportunistic infection, or an AIDS related cancer. The infections are called ‘opportunistic’ because they take advantage of the opportunity offered by a weakened immune system.

      It is possible for someone to be diagnosed with AIDS even if they have not developed an opportunistic infection. AIDS can be diagnosed when the number of immune system cells (CD4 cells) in the blood of an HIV positive person drops below a certain level.

      Worryingly, many people think there is a 'cure' for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS - which perhaps makes them take risks that they otherwise wouldn't. However, there is still no cure for HIV. The only way to ensure that you avoid AIDS is to be aware of how HIV is transmitted and how to prevent HIV infection.

      However, people can take antiretroviral treatment, which suppresses the HIV virus. This can prevent them from reaching a point where they are diagnosed with AIDS. Also, in some cases, it is possible for a person who has an AIDS diagnosis to regain a strong immune system with antiretroviral therapy. However, once somebody is diagnosed with AIDS, officially they keep this diagnosis for life even though in reality an opportunistic infection may be cured or the number of immune system cells (CD4 cells) in their blood may increase to recommended levels

      Since the first cases of AIDS were identified in 1981, more than 30 million people have died from AIDS. An estimated 1.7 million people died as a result of AIDS in 2011 alone.

      Although there is no cure for AIDS, HIV infection can be prevented, and those living with HIV can take antiretroviral drugs to prevent or delay the onset of AIDS. However, in many countries across the world access to prevention and treatment services is limited. Global leaders have pledged to work towards universal access to HIV prevention and care, so that millions of deaths can be averted.

      How is AIDS treated?

      HIV TreatmentAntiretroviral treatment can significantly prolong the lives of people living with HIV. Modern combination therapy is highly effective and someone with HIV who is taking treatment could live for the rest of their life without developing AIDS.

      An AIDS diagnosis does not necessarily equate to a death sentence. Many people can still benefit from starting antiretroviral therapy even once they have developed an AIDS defining illness. Better treatment and prevention for opportunistic infections have also helped to improve the quality and length of life for those diagnosed with AIDS.

      Treating some opportunistic infections is easier than others. Infections such as herpes zoster and candidiasis of the mouth, throat or vagina, can be managed effectively in most environments. On the other hand, more complex infections such as toxoplasmosis, need advanced medical equipment and infrastructure, which are lacking in many resource-poor areas.

      It is also important that treatment is provided for AIDS related pain, which is experienced by almost all people in the very advanced stages of HIV infection.

      Since the eighties, HIV / AIDS has spread like an epidemic, especially in Africa. It is very important to prevent the disease. In particular, many women and girls, and children are completely innocent infected with the virus and die much faster than men on the infection.

      Many men insist on sex without a condom, even the men who already have AIDS / HIV, these men must Vedas punished with long prison sentences, because sexual intercourse without a condom in these cases is murder. It is important to many young girls and women to warn specifically in special counseling centers and support centers.

      HIV is the human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS. CDC estimates that about 56,000 people in the United States contracted HIV in 2006.

      There are two types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2. In the United States, unless otherwise noted, the term “HIV” primarily refers to HIV-1.

      Both types of HIV damage a person’s body by destroying specific blood cells, called CD4+ T cells, which are crucial to helping the body fight diseases.

      Within a few weeks of being infected with HIV, some people develop flu-like symptoms that last for a week or two, but others have no symptoms at all. People living with HIV may appear and feel healthy for several years. However, even if they feel healthy, HIV is still affecting their bodies. All people with HIV should be seen on a regular basis by a health care provider experienced with treating HIV infection. Many people with HIV, including those who feel healthy, can benefit greatly from current medications used to treat HIV infection. These medications can limit or slow down the destruction of the immune system, improve the health of people living with HIV, and may reduce their ability to transmit HIV. Untreated early HIV infection is also associated with many diseases including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer. Support services are also available to many people with HIV. These services can help people cope with their diagnosis, reduce risk behavior, and find needed services.

      AIDS is the late stage of HIV infection, when a person’s immune system is severely damaged and has difficulty fighting diseases and certain cancers. Before the development of certain medications, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Currently, people can live much longer - even decades - with HIV before they develop AIDS. This is because of “highly active” combinations of medications that were introduced in the mid 1990s.

      No one should become complacent about HIV and AIDS. While current medications can dramatically improve the health of people living with HIV and slow progression from HIV infection to AIDS, existing treatments need to be taken daily for the rest of a person’s life, need to be carefully monitored, and come with costs and potential side effects. At this time, there is no cure for HIV infection. Despite major advances in diagnosing and treating HIV infection, in 2007, 35,962 cases of AIDS were diagnosed and 14,110 deaths among people living with HIV were reported in the United States.

      HIV is spread primarily by:

      Not using a condom when having sex with a person who has HIV. All unprotected sex with someone who has HIV contains some risk. However:

      Unprotected anal sex is riskier than unprotected vaginal sex.

      Among men who have sex with other men, unprotected receptive anal sex is riskier than unprotected insertive anal sex.

      Having multiple sex partners or the presence of other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can increase the risk of infection during sex. Unprotected oral sex can also be a risk for HIV transmission, but it is a much lower risk than anal or vaginal sex.

      Sharing needles, syringes, rinse water, or other equipment used to prepare illicit drugs for injection.

      Being born to an infected mother—HIV can be passed from mother to child during pregnancy, birth, or breast-feeding.

      How can HIV be prevented?

      Because the most common ways HIV is transmitted is through anal or vaginal sex or sharing drug injection equipment with a person infected with HIV, it is important to take steps to reduce the risks associated with these. They include:

      Know your HIV status. Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should be tested for HIV at least once. If you are at increased risk for HIV, you should be tested for HIV at least once a year.

      If you have HIV, you can get medical care, treatment, and supportive services to help you stay healthy and reduce your ability to transmit the virus to others.

      If you are pregnant and find that you have HIV, treatments are available to reduce the chance that your baby will have HIV.

      Abstain from sexual activity or be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner.

      Limit your number of sex partners. The fewer partners you have, the less likely you are to encounter someone who is infected with HIV or another STD.

      Correct and consistent condom use. Latex condoms are highly effective at preventing transmission of HIV and some other sexually transmitted diseases. “Natural” or lambskin condoms do not provide sufficient protection against HIV infection.

      Get tested and treated for STDs and insist that your partners do too.

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    • kulvinder khaira STEVENAGE, UNITED KINGDOM
      • about 1 year ago

      In this day and age the Law should protect, not complicate and marginalize, the fundamental human rights of women. IPerhaps I should ask the new pope 'Is it ok for women to suffer?'

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Alan Ditmore LEICESTER, NC
      • almost 2 years ago

      Please read these petitions advocating municipal environmental

      contraception funding, which is increasingly politically realistic due

      to The Big Sort in more and more towns, and helps women's rights, quality of life, and school taxes as well as being at

      least 5 times more cost-effective than any other environmental effort.

      http://tinyurl.com/townBC2

      http://www.feminist.org/news/newsbyte/uswirestory.asp?id=12874

      http://tinyurl.com/towncontraception

      http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/condoms/condoms.shtml

      http://www.facebook.com/alan.ditmore

      https://secure.prochoiceamerica.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=5319

      http://nwhn.org/newsletter/node/1383

      http://action.biologicaldiversity.org/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=5999

      http://tinyurl.com/opcensor

      http://www.change.org/petitions/asheville-lgbt-rights-for-environment

      http://www.change.org/petitions/view/transfer_all_environmental_funds_to_contraception

      http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/transfer-all-environmental-funds-to-contraception-especially-municipal/

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/childfreetown/

      http://www.thebigsort.com/maps.php

      The prochoice and contraception movements are placing too high a priority on defensive actions in the red states when we should be going on the offensive, the side of "change", in the blue states, and cities. The worst places

      will get even worse no matter what we do, but the unrealized political potential, the low hanging fruit, is in making the best places even better. This opportunity is being caused by The Big Sort. Mayors are not answerable to rural voters, unlike governors and presidents.

      http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/News2?abbr=daily4_&page=NewsArticle&id=34158&security=1521&news_iv_ctrl=-1

      http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/News2?abbr=daily4_&page=NewsArticle&id=27823&security=1521&news_iv_ctrl=-1

      http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/News2?abbr=daily4_&page=NewsArticle&id=27825&security=1521&news_iv_ctrl=-1

      http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/News2?abbr=daily4_&page=NewsArticle&id=32477&security=1521&news_iv_ctrl=-1

      http://www.feminist.org/news/newsbyte/uswirestory.asp?id=12891

      https://secure.ppaction.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=12828

      http://www.amplifyyourvoice.org/end_abonly

      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5041388

      We americans love cars more than babies, Very soon we will have to choose, and we will choose cars.

      http://www.projectprevention.org/

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Phil Meyler DUBLIN, IRELAND
      • almost 2 years ago

      Ireland is living in the dark ages

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • C Murray LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM
      • almost 2 years ago

      It saddens me that my friends and family do not have the same rights as I do in the UK. The lack of legislation puts their lives on the line.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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