Stop Dutchess County Jail Expansion-- Invest in People!
  • Petitioning Dutchess County Legislature
  • Responded

This petition will be delivered to:

Dutchess County
Dutchess County Legislature
See response
Dutchess County Executive
Marc Molinaro

Stop Dutchess County Jail Expansion-- Invest in People!

    1. Dutchess County Legislator Joel Tyner
    2. Petition by

      Dutchess County Legislator Joel Tyner

      Staatsburg, NY

Email all 25 Dutchess County Legislators-- at countylegislators@dutchessny.gov-- and Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro-- at countyexec@dutchessny.gov!

"They're closing the schools and now they want to build a new jail-- it's so strange."
-- Ann Perry, City of Poughkeepsie Fifth Ward Councilwoman

[info here inspired/supported by many in End New Jim Crow Action Network; Jobs Not Jails; see http://www.EndtheNewJimCrow.blogspot.com ; http://www.facebook.com/enjanpok ; http://www.JobsNotJails.weebly.com ; for more information contact Co. Leg. Joel Tyner at joeltyner@earthlink.net or 845-444-0599]

Fact: At the Oct. 16th Dutchess County Budget Information Session convened by County Executive Marc Molinaro, he promoted his favored "solution"-- spending four million dollars more for 200 jail cell "pods."

 

 

[re: jail "pods"-- recall YNN 9/20-- "Dutchess County Jail considers temporary "pods"" by John Wagner:    

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Wake up folks-- just as many of us suspected/expected all along, real GOP plan was not to get new $126-million, 500-bed jail constructed asap-- their strategy was to have county's Criminal Justice Council propose ridiculous monstrosity that size-- so plan for $4M for pods seems "small" by comparison.

 

Three big reasons why Dutchess County shouldn't waste $4 million more for 200 new jail cell "pods":

 

Fact #1: Peter Young Housing, Industry, and Treatment has cut the recidivism rate for ex-cons in Albany County and other NYS counties PYHIT operates in from 67% to 10%-- saving literally $14 million a year there for Albany County taxpayers alone according to John Jay College of Criminal Justice (see below).

[ ; ]

 

Fact #2: Dutchess County currently does not have a fraternity for dads behind bars similar to what Newark's Mayor Cory Booker recently started there-- an organization for incarcerated fathers that has literally slashed local recidivism rate from 65% to 3% (recall Time magazine article on this 11/29/10).

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Fact #3: Dutchess County currently does not have a truly comprehensive system of re-entry for folks leaving jail and prison modeled after Brooklyn District Attorney Charlie Hynes' ComAlert program that has cut the recidivism rate there by 50% (and been repeated recognized by the Times in editorial and op-ed pages for this; still working.  Recall-- ComAlert Director John Chaney spoke at Holy Light Pentecostal Church in Poughkeepsie in summer of 2011 at one of our Jobs Not Jails meetings and shared numbers-- recall 11/29/07 NYTimes editorial "The Right Way to Handle Former Inmates":

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[...aside from fact that Dutchess GOP still continue to woefully underfund needed activities and programs for children and youth to keep them out of trouble and out of the criminal justice system to begin with!...(see below-- full list of what's lost/needed)]

Fact: Even the Criminal Justice Council's new report admits (on p. 24) that literally over 80% of Dutchess County Jail inmates have substance abuse or mental health issues(!).

Fact: Dutchess County currently does not have a truly effective Pre-Trial Release program along the lines of what the Town of Poughkeepsie and Baldwin County, Alabama have (even recent CJC report recognized T/Pok. for this; called for this to be expanded countywide across Dutchess; Baldwin County program was recently recognized for this by the National Association of Counties). According to the "Crimestat" report Co. Leg. Joel Tyner distributed at a recent ENJAN meeting, there are now only 59 current county jail inmates sentenced out of total of 464 inmates boarded in/out. Dutchess County is not effectively diverting low-end probation and parole violators to nonincarcerative settings as the HOPE Project in Hawaii, the High Point project in North Carolina and an experiment in Multnomah County (home to Portland, Oregon) have safely done. Dutchess County currently does not have a fraternity for dads behind bars similar to what Newark's Mayor Cory Booker recently started there-- an organization for incarcerated fathers that has literally slashed the local recidivism rate from 65% to 3%
Dutchess County currently does not have a truly comprehensive system of re-entry for folks leaving jail and prison modeled after Brooklyn District Attorney Charlie Hynes' ComAlert program that has cut the recidivism rate there by 50%.

Fact: Dutchess County currently does not have an effective re-entry program along the lines of what Peter Young Housing, Industry, and Treatment has made happen in Albany County. Dutchess County currently does not have a cost-saving housing-first strategy for the chronically mentally ill homeless alcoholics and drug addicts. Dutchess County currently does not have a cost-saving Job Court program modeled after the model one from Lancaster County/PA. Dutchess County currently does not have a bail loan fund for some accused of nonviolent misdemeanors, as in Tompkins County. Dutchess County currently does not have an effective Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) program here as in Dakota County, Minnesota. Dutchess County is not currently sufficiently funding a program similar to the Youth Empowerment Project in New Orleans.

Fact: Dutchess County completely eliminated our Youth Bureau's Project Return program in December 2010. Dutchess County's GOP leadership can find no more funding to keep the Big Brothers Big Sisters program for children of the incarcerated alive. Dutchess County no longer has full funding for these two programs that could cut slash overcrowding-- restore BOCES job/transitional staff position in jail (eliminated in 2010 by Co. Leg. GOP majority); restore Mediation Center of Du. Co. (juvenile delinquency prevention for troubled teens) cut by GOP. Dutchess County should fully restore county $ for these five programs massively cut by GOP in 2010: Cornell/4-H, Youth Mentoring/Job Training/Placement at Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce, Dutchess County Arts Council, Mill Street Loft, and Literacy Connections.

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15 PROGRAMS DUTCHESS COUNTY DOESN'T HAVE THAT COULD SLASH JAIL OVERCROWDING:

[recall-- ;
more: ]

1. Dutchess County currently does not have a truly effective Pre-Trial Release program along the lines of what Baldwin County, Alabama has (recently recognized for this by the National Association of Counties). According to the "Crimestat" report I distributed at a recent ENJAN meeting, there are now only 59 current county jail inmates sentenced out of total of 464 inmates boarded in/out. Baldwin County's Pre-Trial Release program "enrolls qualified offenders who can not make bond or bail, allowing them to be responsible citizens while awaiting their court dates. These offenders are strictly monitored and supervised on a weekly basis. These offenders pay a small monthly fee to participate in the program. " As Acting Public Defender Tom Angell pointed out last July 1st, over 70% of those in our county jail at $130 a day haven't even gone to trial yet-- a higher number than in many other county jails. According to Angell in July 2011, "the length of stay of nonviolent felonies has increased by 46% over the last 12 months, but arrests have gone down 13% from 12 months ago, violent felony arrests have decreased 25%, and drug felony arrests have gone down 27%-- yet our county jail population has increased by approximately 5% over the past year. We should have seen a corresponding decrease in our county jail population." Dutchess County also needs a so-called "rocket docket" here similar to what NYC has: speed up processing of hundreds now languishing in jail who haven't even gone to trial.
[ ; ;
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2. Dutchess County is not effectively diverting low-end probation and parole violators to nonincarcerative settings as the HOPE Project in Hawaii, the High Point project in North Carolina and an experiment in Multnomah County (home to Portland, Oregon) have safely done-- "All these model programs view jail and prison sentences as a last option rather than a default, and swift responses to violations are considered more important than harsh ones. For reformers, it is a rare breath of fresh air." (as reported on in July 5, 2010 cover article in The Nation by Sasha Abramsky-- "Is This The End of War on Crime?").
[ ]

3. Dutchess County currently does not have a fraternity for dads behind bars similar to what Newark's Mayor Cory Booker recently started there-- an organization for incarcerated fathers that has literally slashed the local recidivism rate from 65% to 3% (recall Time magazine article on this 11/29/10; CNN report too).
[ ]

4. Dutchess County currently does not have a truly comprehensive system of re-entry for folks leaving jail and prison modeled after Brooklyn District Attorney Charlie Hynes' ComAlert program that has cut the recidivism rate there by 50% (and been repeated recognized by the Times in editorial and op-ed pages for this; still working. Recall-- ComAlert Director John Chaney spoke at Holy Light Pentecostal Church in Poughkeepsie in summer of 2011 at one of our Jobs Not Jails meetings and shared numbers-- recall 11/29/07 NYTimes editorial "The Right Way to Handle Former Inmates":
[ ; ;
]

5. Dutchess County currently does not have an effective re-entry program along the lines of what Peter Young Housing, Industry, and Treatment has made happen in Albany County-- saving literally $14 million a year there for local taxpayers and slashing the recidivism rate for ex-cons from 67% to 10%, according to the John Jay School of Criminal Justice (scroll down for letter going into detail on this).
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6. Dutchess County currently does not have a cost-saving housing-first strategy for the chronically mentally ill homeless alcoholics and drug addicts who have been cycling in and out of our jail here in Dutchess, as former Mental Health America of Dutchess County Executive Director Jacki Brownstein long advocated, and as has been successfully implemented in Westchester (cutting homeless population in half there according to NYTimes), much of NYC, Chattanooga, and San Francisco.
[ ; ]

7. Dutchess County currently does not have a cost-saving Job Court program modeled after the model one from Lancaster County/PA'profiled a few years ago by National Public Radio (to cut recidivism).
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8. Dutchess County currently does not have a bail loan fund for some accused of nonviolent misdemeanors, as in Tompkins County. Typically there are a bit over ten folks in our county jail with bail of $2000 or less. Tompkins County, with one-third population of Dutchess, saves over $400,000 a year for their county taxpayers with United Way-funded bail loan fund there for some accused of nonviolent misdemeanors.
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9. Dutchess County currently does not have an effective Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) program here as in Dakota County, Minnesota. Dakota County sought to reform the juvenile justice system by using detention placements only for juveniles who pose a risk to public safety or are likely to fail to appear in court. In doing so, the JDAI also intended to eliminate racial disparities in youth served in county Corrections. A broad collaboration of stakeholders for Dakota County juvenile justice worked together to define the issues, develop a Risk Assessment Instrument (RAI) to guide decisions on secure detention of youth, and create a data system to inform policies as juveniles move into and through the Corrections system. The automated RAI and JDAI were implemented in May of 2008. Juvenile detention intakes fell 78% from a prior three-year average of 533 annually down to 114 in 2011. The average daily population in the Juvenile Service Center dropped 56% for all Dakota County youth and 47% for Dakota County youth of color, representing participation in detention and a range of correctional treatment programs.
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10. Dutchess County is not currently sufficiently funding a program similar to the Youth Empowerment Project in New Orleans-- reported on NPR July 30th to cut 70% recidivism rate there down to 7%.
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11. Dutchess County completely eliminated our Youth Bureau's Project Return program in December 2010-- even though from 2005-2010, Project Return worked with 194 high risk teenagers; only eight young people were closed due to out of home placements; over the same time period, Project Return provided counseling, advocacy and skills building for 1376 young people. Only three (3) were closed due to out of home placements-- not including almost 3000 young county residents who received workshop trainings on anti-bullying, bias awareness, anger management and conflict resolution skills.
[scroll down a bit to see Dec. 2012 memo from Dutchess Co. CSEA Pres. Liz Piraino re: Project Return]
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12. Dutchess County's GOP leadership can find no more funding to keep the Big Brothers Big Sisters program for children of the incarcerated alive- even though Big Brothers Big Sisters used to provide "one-on-one mentorship for children up to age 17, affecting 102 mentors and children-- mostly from low-income, single-parent households; about half of the children participating in the program were from the City of Poughkeepsie (recall July 11th Poughkeepsie Journal article on this).
[ http://www.BBBS.org/ ]

13. Dutchess County no longer has full funding for these two programs that could cut slash overcrowding:
-- Restore BOCES job/transitional staff position in jail (eliminated in 2010 by Co. Leg. GOP majority)
-- Restore Mediation Center of Du. Co. (juvenile delinquency prevention for troubled teens) cut by GOP.
[youth in 245 different families served in 2009 in community-- not $240,000/year each for incarceration]

14. Dutchess County should fully restore county $ for these five programs massively cut by GOP in 2010: Cornell/4-H, Youth Mentoring/Job Training/Placement at Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce, Dutchess County Arts Council, Mill Street Loft, and Literacy Connections-- all four of these local institutions perform an incredibly valuable service to the community keeping youth on right track.
[recall, too-- the City of Poughkeepsie Public School District has gone to half-day kindergarten, Smith Elementary School has shut its doors (along with Hyde Park Elementary and LaGrange Elementary)-- and the power structure, seemingly, can find no more money to keep funding]

15. Dutchess County should fully embrace all the cost-saving, pro-active, preventive recommendations put forth by the national and statewide Fight Crime: Invest in Kids Coalition (recall-- even Sheriff Butch Anderson and DA Bill Grady have long been charter members of this organization that calls for serious, pro-active, preventive, cost-saving investments in pre-K, afterschool activities, and community-based programs for low-risk to medium-risk youth prone to juvenile delinquency; see ).
[see ; former Tompkins Co. Leg. Chair Tim Joseph shared news with me five years ago about this coalition; Joseph led successful opposition there to jail expansion for years]
Dutchess County should implement all of the recommendations from http://www.JusticePolicy.org/ .
[also-- I've contacted Mike Thompson, director of the New York-based Council of State Government's Justice Center (see -- quoted in July 5th The Nation piece cited above; copied below)-- he seems quite interested in pulling together with us to organize a forum soon re: common-sense, cost-saving alternatives to jail expansion locally; details to come]

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[details here on how/why the Project Return program should be funded again at county Youth Bureau]
Recall below info from Dutchess CSEA Pres. Liz Piraino (Lizbeth.Piraino@dfa.state.ny.us):

To: Robert Rolison, Chairman
Dutchess County Legislature

Date: November 23, 2010

The justification given on November 17th for decimating the Youth Services Unit, including the elimination of a Youth Worker as well as the complete elimination of Project Return was because, "In the last ten years, other evidence-based practices have been incorporated in other departments that also serve these high risk youth." (Director of HHSC speaking before the Dutchess County Legislature's Budget and Finance Committee) Less than ten minutes later, the same Cabinet Director attributed the decrease in DSS placement numbers to "?the good work of Youth Bureau staff and the good work of Probation and a lot of contractors."

"Evidence based practices" and "Evidence based programs" are two recent buzz words used in government for those programs that have received millions of dollars in order to study their effectiveness. In the past twenty-five years, YSU has not been permitted to apply for any grants other than those available from OCFS or DSS, so millions have not been spent to see if our programming works. We do, however, have thousands of case records in our files that provide evidence of what kind of "success" our young clients have attained while in our programs.

The cost for CSE Placements (room & board) in the Tentative 2011 DSS budget is $7,200,000, up $384,000. The cost for Institutional Care Placements in the same budget is $17,400,000, up $1,457,000 from 2010. the amount proposed to spend is up $2,300,000 over the total amount expended in 2009, and up $2,6000,000 over the total amount expended in 2008. Together, between school-placed youth and DSS placed youth, the tentative budget is recommending a whopping $21,600,000 to send kids out the community in 2011!

Over the past five years, Project Return has worked with 194 high risk teenagers. Only eight (8) young people were closed due to out of home placements and five (5) of those placements were terms in non-secure detention or rehab ordered by the Youth Treatment Court as sanctions for failing to comply with judicial orders.

Over the same time period, YSU provided counseling, advocacy and skills building for 1376 young people. Only three (3) were closed due to out of home placements. [Please note that these figures do not include nearly three thousand young county residents who received workshop trainings on anti-bullying, bias awareness, anger management and conflict resolution skills.]

During the same November 17th budget hearing, the figure of $240,000 was quoted as the amount it cost to house a youth in jail for one year. This amounts to $657.53 per youth per day. Project Return costs under $24 per youth per day to keep them in their homes and in the community! The counseling services provided to Youth Services Unit clients not involved in Project Return cost less than $8 per youth per day.

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[documentation here how saves Albany Co. taxpayers $14 million annually!]

From: Judy Troilo

Attached is a summarized breakdown of our study. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me directly.

Judy Troilo
Executive Director
Peter Young Housing, Industries & Treatment
The Altamont Program, Inc.
518 377 2448 ext 215
http://www.PYHIT.com/

Total gross savings to the state of NY= $13,835,272.00

Breakdown of total gross savings:

TANF 140 @ $39,624.00 Per person $5,547,360.00
SN 96 @ $8,116.00 Per person $779,136.00
CJ 103 @ $45,000.00 Per person $4,635,000.00
SA 172 @ $16,708.00 Per person $2,873,776.00

$13,835,272.00

Total cost to State and Local Government to provide employment services through the Altamont Program, Inc. which resulted in the successful employment placement and maintenance of the participants = $1,127,700 .00

After subtracting the cost per individual for services resulting in successful outcomes the total savings = $12,707,572.00

Breakdown of COST for services provided which resulted in successful outcomes by the Altamont Program:
TANF 140 @ $3,000 Per person $420,000
SN 96 @ $2,000 Per person $192,000
CJ 103 @ $1,500 Per person $154,500
SA 172 @ $2,100 Per person $361,200
Peter Young Housing, Industries & Treatment

Mission Statement: Creating Taxpayers

Our mission consists of the following: To help individuals recover from the disease of alcohol and drug addiction. To help ease the transition from correctional facilities to community living, and assist the individual to confront and overcome the underlying problems that trigger and sustain substance abuse and other self-destructive behaviors. To end the cycle of incarceration and relapse, and assist the individual in successful and constructive reentry into society. In short, to create taxpayers.
We create taxpayers by serving people who are afflicted with chemical dependencies; those who are homeless; and those unprepared to make a successful transition to the world of work and good citizenship, responsibility, and community reintegration.

Summary:

The Altamont Program's Vocational Educational and Employment Services division is the component of Father Peter Young's programs which is responsible for assisting individuals with employment placement and job retention services. Historically The Altamont Program's Client base is considered a 'Hard to Serve', chronically unemployed population. The Majority of theses individuals have profound barriers as a result of years of substance abuse, incarceration and chronic unemployment. Many of these individuals have multiple barriers and many secondary issues which have prevented successful transition back into the work force. The Altamont Program considers and assists the 'entire' person. The Altamont Program has successfully served thousands of individuals across the state and enabled many to successfully reintegrate back into society. Father Young's aftercare network, referred to as the "Glidepath To Recovery," effectively addresses the obstacles to a successful recovery by providing guidance in the way of professional treatment, a safe place to stay, and a meaningful job.

Purpose of Analysis:

The purposes of this analysis was to identify the cost savings to the State of New York by way of PYHIT Employment services' creating tax payers.

About the Data:

The data sets used for this analysis were extracted from Altamont Program Employment program contract and non contract data spread sheets covering the period of 8/1/09-7/31/10. The complete spread sheets are used for tracking purposes of all individuals served during a given period. They are specifically drawn from data charts of participation and outcomes defined as: VESID, Albany County Department of Social Services SafetyNET Individuals and TANF (including Transitional Jobs and GREEN Jobs), Rensselaer County Task Force, Honor Court and Parole direct referrals, Office of Temporary Disability Assistance Funded programs; FSET (Food Stamp), WSP (Wage Subsidy Program) and WTW/HIV (Welfare to Work, HIV). All Data extracted is considered successful outcomes. Successful outcomes is defined as: hard to serve individuals placed in meaningful employment with offered benefits and monitored for at least 90 days to confirm retention.

About the Process:

Four (4) major categories were defined which identify the clear and known barriers to employment of the hard to serve population (the PYHIT population). For this purpose the meaning of clear and known is- the individuals were referred directly from an entity identifying them us such (i.e., ACDSS TANF program, NYS parole, etc.) or they met a criteria of a program which requires proof of barriers (i.e. VESID and/or NYSID for substance abuse disability).

Categories:

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CLIENT
CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLIENT
TANF CLIENT
SAFETY NET CLIENT

Only successful outcomes were extracted from the complete Altamont Program, Employment Services' data base and categorized appropriately. It is important to note approximately 20% are included in more then one category as the original data dictates more then one clear and known major barrier as defined.

The cost to the State of New York per individual (or TANF family) was approximated by obtaining hard costs from the respective state or local government agencies either via Web search or direct contact with agency representative. These numbers represent the cost, to New York State, eliminated per individual in each category on or before 90 days of employment retention has been met.

List of per Individual cost per Category:

Substance Abuse Client
In-Patient Treatment-$4,426
Out-Patient Treatment-$5,580
Supportive Living-$5,400
Food Stamps-$978
Transportation-$324
Total Cost per Individual = $16,708.00

TANF recipient
(Average case size of 3 member family)
Cash Grant (housing)-$8,640
Food Stamps-$5,880
Child Care-$18,720
Medicaid-$6.060
Transportation-$324
Total Cost per recipient= $39,624.00

SAFETY NET recipient
Cash Grant (housing)-$ 3,852
Food Stamps-$ 1,920
Medicaid-$ 2,020 (without SA treatment)
Transportation-$324
Total Cost per recipient= $8,116.00

Criminal Justice Client
Incarceration= $45,000
Total Cost per inmate= $45,000.00
4. Finally, the total amount of individual successes in each given category was multiplied by the approximated per individual cost provided for each categories.

The Results:

Approximately 409 individuals served by the Altamont Program's Employment department during the period 8/1/09-7/31/10 were successfully placed in employment and retained their job. A total of 511 successes were noted (approximately 98 in two (2) or more categories).

Breakdown of Success:

TANF 140 @ $39,624.00 Per person $5,547,360.00
SN 96 @ $8,116.00 Per person $779,136.00
CJ 103 @ $45,000.00 Per person $4,635,000.00
SA 172 @ $16,708.00 Per person $2,873,776.00

$13,835,272.00 actual

Total savings to the State of New York= $13,835,272.00 *
* Based on hard data. original data source is maintained by Judy Troilo of the Altamont Program. Data sets are available through: P.G. Young, J. Gentile or J. Troilo

Additional savings not reflected in Data analysis:

C. Matthews (2007) explains The daily cost for housing an inmate in a local jail ranges from $291 in New York City to more than $100 for counties outside the city, according to the Association of Counties. Counties and New York City house hundreds of inmates awaiting transfer to state prisons, representing a total of $38 million in annual expenses for counties, the group said.

C. Matthews, (July 26, 2007) NY: Inmates can get health benefits when released., The Real Cost of Prison Weblog. http://realcostofprisons.org/blog/archives/2007/07/ny_inmates_can.html

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[below-- article on all this from recent front page of Northern Dutchess News/Southern Dutchess News]

"Protestors: County Jail Expansion A Waste of Money"

by Rich Flaherty

POUGHKEEPSIE-- About a dozen people held an informational protest last Monday in front of the Dutchess County Office Building in Poughkeepsie, against any further expansion of the overcrowded county jail.

One of the organizers of the demonstration was Dutchess County Legislator Joel Tyner (D-Clinton/Rhinebeck), who lamented the limited amount of county funds fo non-profit organizations for this year, especially with the recent closing of Big Brothers Big Sisters. He's also concerned that many of his colleagues may be in favor of a future vote to commit money for new jail cell space.

"Big Brothers Big Sisters, a very valuable nonprofit that was really doing really wonderful work. Pro-active in saving tax dollars to keep at-risk kids from being mixed up in the criminal justice system," Tyner said. "They shut down."

He described how the county didn't have enough money to help fund Big Brothers Big Sisters, prevent a tuition increase at the community college, but he said there may be support to construct new jail cells.

"But, lo and behold, they are still bent, driven and obsessed on wasting tens of millions of our county tax dollars on jail expansion that we don't need," said Tyner.

Larry Andreassen said the closing of Big Brothers Big Sisters was a critical blow to a pro-active approach to keep young people out of the criminal justice system.

"It prevents the mentoring chip that kids need to keep them out of jail," said Andreassen. "Once they get into jail, then it's very expensive. This is money well spent, money up front. It's preventive care, as opposed to going through the (justice) system." He added, "This is regressive, this is not progressive."

Dutchess Community College student Jared Keasbey said if the county has enough money to spend at the county jail, then officials could direct some of it to the community college.

"With tens of millions of dollars being used for jail expansion, I don't see why the county can't throw a little bit more money toward the community college." Keasbey added, "I don't know why we can't use a little bit of that money towards expanding our education, rather than our jail."

Tyner said other counties and communities have reduced jail overcrowding with programs similar to Big Brothers Big Sisters.

He said other jurisdictions have expanded alternative to incarceration programs for non-violent offenders and developed jail in-house counseling, mentoring, treatment and education programs to reduce recidivism...

Recent signatures

    News

    1. Reached 100 signatures
    2. Decision-maker Dutchess County Legislature responds:

      Dutchess County Legislature

      No jail expansion. Alternatives to incarceration work.


    3. Decision-maker Dutchess County Legislature responds:

      Dutchess County Legislature

      Stop expanding jails, invest in what actually heals a community so plagued by social ills like Poughkeepsie. Invest in education, help homeowners stay in their homes, decrease inequality. This is what this voter really wants.


    4. Reached 50 signatures

    Supporters

    Reasons for signing

    • Joseph Rowell ROCHESTER, NH
      • 12 months ago

      Schools not jails! End the racist war on drugs.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • joseph calabro POUGHKEEPSIE, NY
      • about 1 year ago

      I am a pediatrician and would like to see young people get job training and education not jail

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Nathanael Bodon BEACON, NY
      • over 1 year ago

      prisons perpetuate themselves by focusing on punishment rather than rehabilitation.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • earl brown POUGHKEEPSIE, NY
      • over 1 year ago

      Because more jails will not end this social ill , only mask it.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Douglas C Smyth HIGH FALLS, NY
      • over 1 year ago

      jails are no solution: they warehouse people and drive them to become losers, criminals, dependents on the rest of us.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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