China - stop the killing of elephants and rhinos across Africa!
  • Petitioned Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, Wen JIabao

This petition was delivered to:

Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, Wen JIabao

China - stop the killing of elephants and rhinos across Africa!

    1. Ol Pejeta Conservancy
    2. Petition by

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy

      Nanyuki, Kenya

Rhino poaching (especially across Africa) has reached unprecedented levels; most rhino species across the world are highly endangered and the current poaching pressure has arisen largely as a result of demand for rhino horn in China. Similarly elephant poaching across Africa has now reached levels not seen since the 1980's, also driven by demand for ivory from China. Recent estimates suggest 35,000 elephants are now being illegally killed in Africa per year. This is unsustainable. An international outcry is now required to force the Chinese government to stop the illegal trade in rhino horn and elephant ivory before it is too late

Recent signatures

    News

    1. Reached 20,000 signatures
    2. Suspected rhino poacher out on bail

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      Rhino poaching woes seem to be a never-ending tale.

      The police’s organised crime unit members arrested Jan Louis Lessing, 58, manager of Entabeni Game Reserve at Naboomspruit, who was found was in possession of three rhino horns, four elephant tusks as well several fire-arms.

      Lessing was arrested on Wednesday and appeared in Naboomspruit Magistrate’s Court on Thursday. He was released on R3000 bail and the case was remanded to March 29 for further investigation.

      Police spokesperson Brig Hangwani Mulaudzi said the arrest followed intensive investigation by the Hawks into unrelenting rhino poaching in the area.

    3. Rhino poachers jailed for 25 years each

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      "This is an indication that, as a country, we are taking more stringent measures in the fight against rhino poaching," he said.

      Aselmo Baloyi, Jawaki Nkuna and Ismael Baloy were also found guilty of possessing an illegal firearm (an automatic rifle), possession of a firearm (a hunting rifle) and possession of ammunition.

      They were caught with two freshly chopped rhino horns, an assault rifle, a hunting rifle and an axe.

      Mabunda said that last year 232 suspected poachers were arrested, including 26 who died in fights with the authorities.

    4. Thai Elephants' New Threat: Poachers After Their Meat

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      A new gastronomic fad in Thailand is pushing the country's elephants a step closer to extinction. Poachers, who have historically hunted elephants to obtain their ivory tusks, are now killing the giant mammals and selling their trunks and sexual organs to be eaten as food, reports the AP. Consumption of elephant meat is rare, but some Asian cultures believe it will increase a person's sexual prowess; an elephant penis sells for an estimated $950.

    5. British zoos put on alert over rising threat of rhino rustlers

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      British zoos have been warned their rhinos may be attacked by poachers because of the soaring value of their horns in the Asian medicine market.

      After a rumour that it could cure cancer, the horn is now worth more than $40,000 a kilo, and gangs have been breaking into museums and auction rooms in Britain and Europe to steal trophy rhinoceros heads. The fear is zoos – and live rhinos – may be next.

      In an unprecedented alert, all 15 British zoos and wildlife and safari parks which hold rhinos – they have 85 animals between them – have been warned by the National Wildlife Crime Unit to tighten security and report anything suspicious to the police at once.

      "We have warned British zoos to be on their guard against the possibility of being targeted by criminals seeking rhino horn," said the head of the unit, Detective Inspector Brian Stuart.

    6. The solution to rhino poaching?

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      A string of strategies to tackle the rise in rhino poaching was put to Parliament's environmental affairs committee on Thursday.

      Committee chairperson Johnny de Lange praised the size of the crowd as well as the number of submissions (14) by individuals and organisations.

      It was clear from public submissions that rhinos were being let down in at least three ways: a lack of funding, weaknesses in law enforcement and loopholes in the system.

      Wilderness Foundation CEO Andrew Muir said it would cost roughly R25 000 a year to adequately protect a rhino from poachers.

      "That works out to R500-million a year. I know that money is not going to be forthcoming from national coffers, so the question that has to be asked is where is that money going to come from?

    7. Monitoring a Grim Rise In the Illegal Ivory Trade

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      Last year was the worst year for ivory seizures since an international ivory ban went into effect in 1989. During 2011, authorities seized more than 23 tons of ivory, which represented about 2,500 individual elephants killed.

      At the forefront of efforts to track this grim data is Tom Milliken, the elephant expert for TRAFFIC, the group that monitors the international trade in wildlife under CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). In that role, the U.S.-born Milliken tracks and analyzes data related to the ivory trade and attempts to raise awareness of the importance of preserving one of Africa’s most iconic species.

      Milliken, who has lived in Africa since 1991, attributes the latest spike in ivory seizures to a seemingly insatiable demand for ivory in Asia and the increasingly sophisticated network of criminal gangs that are feeding the market.

    8. Rhino poaching: what is the solution?

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      There are several practical and highly profitable ways to end the slaughter of Africa’s rhinos, writes Michael Eustace

      IN 1910, South Africa was said to have 100 white rhinos. With great care and good management, the number has increased to 19000 today.

      There are also 2000 black rhinos in the country. In 1960, there were 100000 in Africa outside the South Africa, but by 1970 that population had fallen to 65000, and today there are only 3150.

      If there had been no poaching from 1970, the black-rhino population in the rest of Africa, at its natural growth rate of 6% a year, would have increased to 700000 today. (There would not have been the habitat to accommodate that number of rhinos, but the arithmetic is interesting.)

    9. A Different Way of Thinking About Rhino Poaching?

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      It is a violent act to kill a defenseless, non-offending animal like a rhino. However we will never see the end to such violence if we do not deal with human poverty that exists within ourselves and on the edge of wildlife reserves. Poverty can be physical like starvation, disease and homelessness, but it can also be emotional - the inner emptiness that leads to deprivation rage and many types of addictions and obsessions from drinking, drugging and promiscuity on one end of the lifestyle continuum to perfectionism and being a workaholic on the other end.

      A lack of emotional intelligence also compromises the way we think, instead of being able to manage different perspectives and different needs in a comprehensive way with respect and integrity for all, we disintegrate into discrimination and competition for resources.

    10. South Africa — Despite increased law enforcement efforts, rhino poaching ac

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      South Africa — Despite increased law enforcement efforts, rhino poaching accelerated in South Africa last year. The country lost 448 rhinos to poaching in 2011, official government statistics reveal. The total includes 19 critically endangered black rhinos, of which fewer than 5,000 remain in the wild. In 2010, 333 South African rhinos were killed by poachers, nearly three times the number killed in 2009.

      "The rate of poaching increase may appear to be faltering, but the bottom line is more rhinos than ever were poached in 2011," said Dr Colman O Criodain, WWF's wildlife trade policy analyst. "If left unchecked, poaching gangs could put the survival of these iconic species in jeopardy."

    11. I have something to tell you -

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      Have a look a this informative video to learn how poaching is destroying Africa's rhinos populations

    12. 'Christmas miracle' for endangered rhinos

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      Conservationists and wildlife officials in the Malaysian state of Sabah airlifted a young female Sumatran Rhinoceros — one of the world's most endangered animals — to an area of forest where she would encounter a potential partner, reports the Sabah Wildlife Department and Borneo Rhino Alliance. Sumatran Rhinoceros populations are so low, some individuals live in areas where they have no hope of ever finding another rhino.

      “This is a fantastic gift for our uphill battle in ensuring the survival of this truly unique species and wonderful timing with Christmas, a time to give thanks for our blessings,” said Laurentius Ambu the Director of the SWD.

    13. Rhino Horns Now at $30,000 Pound

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      Rhino Horns Now at $30,000 Pound - Poachers Cash in on Cancer Cure and Healing Reputation
      By Marty Cox

      Can rhino horns cure cancer? Some believe it has remarkable healing powers and that has driven the price of rhino horns to a stunning $30,000 Pound!

      That's $65,000 a kilogram and National Geographic reveals that stunning number is "higher than that of gold, platinum and cocaine."

      Of course that has drawn the interest of poachers who wish to cash in and more and more rhinos are being killed for the horns, which are ground down and sold as medicine.

      Does it really work?

      Many says no.

    14. Outrage over bid to hunt white rhino

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      An anti-rhino poaching activist has challenged the “mystery businessman” who forked out close to R1 million to hunt and kill a white rhino in KwaZulu-Natal to identify himself, exchange his high-powered rifle for a camera, take the shot and walk away.

      Simon Bloch, of Outraged South African Citizens Against Poaching, was reacting to an announcement by Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife that a KZN businessman had paid R960 000 for the right to hunt a white rhino at Mkuze game reserve.

      The offer came after Ezemvelo had asked people to bid online to kill the animal, which was deemed surplus to requirements.

    15. Will 2012 Be a Good Year for Elephants?

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      A new year offers the hope of a fresh start. Few need it more than African elephants. Last year saw a record number of large-scale seizures of illegal ivory—up 200% over 2010—weighing a total of 23 tonnes. That’s 2,500 dead elephants.

      Who’s responsible? Chinese criminal gangs, feeding an ever-growing appetite for ivory back home, says Tom Milliken, anelephant expert at TRAFFIC, a UN-sponsored wildlife trade monitoring network. “Asian countries in general, but particularly China, are targeting the natural resource bounty of Africa to sustain economic growth at home,” he wrote in an email to TIME. “For many Asians, Africa represents a ‘wild west’ where one can get rich.”

    16. Combating Rhino horn Hunting in South Africa

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      CNN's Robyn Curnow takes a look at the methods used to combat illegal rhino hunting in South Africa. http://ow.ly/8hunW

    17. Businessman helps crack rhino horn ring

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      A businessman ditched the boardroom yesterday to bust what appears to be an ivory and shark fin syndicate operating from an upmarket block of flats in Cape Town.

      Searle Derman, owner of the luxury Aquila Private Game Reserve, called police to raid the apartment complex in Table View.

      Shortly after about 9am, Melody de Andrade called Derman to tell him about a peculiar smell coming from a neighbouring garage.

    18. Business must support rhino cause

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      December 16 2011 at 09:00am

      What a tragic day once again for South Africans to read in The Star on Monday about the rhino poachers hacking away at the future of our rhino population.

      The poaching of SA’s rhinos have reached alarming figures. What baffles me – and I’m not a vet or a CIA agent – is the fact that these rhinos were darted and drugged.

      Is there a register in SA whereby all scheduled drugs intended for the darting and tranquillising of animals, in particular rhinos, are kept, updated and checked at all times?

      I fail to see where the poachers are getting the drugs to dart rhinos with, as I’m sure this drug isn’t one that they can simply order online or buy over the counter.

      Why, if the whole world is aware of the high figures of rhino poaching in SA, has no one thought of establishing an online register to clearly reflect all tranquilliser drugs sold, showing the supplier and the purchaser’s details?

    19. Kenya turned into ivory trade hub

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      Kenya has become a transit point for contraband ivory, it was revealed on Friday.

      Kenya Wildlife Services director Julius Kipng’etich said poachers from Congo, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia were shipping their illegal cargo through the Mombasa port to Asia.

      “They favour Kenya because the port of Mombasa is fast moving and the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport was one of the only three airports in Africa with direct flights to Asia,” he said.

      Nine-year ban

      In the past two weeks, police have impounded dozens of ivory suspected to be on transit to Malaysia and China.

      Mr Kipng’etich blamed the rise on the lifting of a nine-year ban on ivory sales in 2007.

    20. Six Black rhinos die of natural causes in Zambia's North Luangwa

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      December 2011: In a tragic blow, six black rhinos have died in Zambia in a period of just a few weeks.

      The animals died from natural causes - but the age, sex and cause of all the deaths, which all happened in North Luangwa National Park, are all seemingly unrelated.

      The Frankfurt Zoological Society's North Luangwa Conservation programme (FZS-NLCP) has convened an Emergency Rhino Forum and invited experts from across southern Africa to brainstorm and attempt to resolve why these deaths have all occurred in such a short space of time.

      'We had been optimistic we were turning a corner...'
      A spokesmen for FZS-NLCP said: ‘It is with great sadness that we report these deaths. Until recently we were optimistic we were turning a corner with the new founder population.

    21. Four men were arrested for rhino poaching in Hoedspruit on Thursday, Limpop

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      Four men were arrested for rhino poaching in Hoedspruit on Thursday, Limpopo police said.

      They were found in possession of two horns, said Brigadier Hangwani Mulaudzi.

      A carcass was also discovered in the area around the time of their arrest. Two rifles and an axe found in their possession were seized.

      The group, aged between 25 and 35, have also been linked to the poaching of a rhino and a calf last week.

      They are due to appear in court next week. – Sapa

    22. Rhino poaching avalanche getting worse – And robberies escalating too

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      408 rhinos killed in South Africa so far in 2011
      December 2011. South African National Parks announces that 405 rhinos have been poached throughout South Africa so far this year. However, at least two more have been killed in South Africa's Limpopo province since the announcement was made a few days ago. The hardest hit areas have been the Kruger National Park, Limpopo and KwaZulu-Natal provinces.

      Increase from 333 rhinos killed in 2011
      The number of rhinos poached is up by approximately 21.6% from the 333 of the previous year, against an increase of 173% and 47% for 2010 and 2009 respectively. The number of arrests has also increased from the previous year by approximately 27.3% to 210, from 165 in 2010. See the table below.

      Robberies
      There has been an increasing incidence, especially across Europe, of robberies of Rhino horn from museums and other institutions.

    23. Record 443 Rhinos Killed by Poachers in South Africa in 2011

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      It has been a bad year for rhinos in South Africa. Many more got killed than in 2010, the 333 toll of which was described with words like “shocking” and “outrageous”. Most thought it couldn’t get worse.

      It’s got much worse. The tally for 2011 is at least 433. It could end up being higher, for even as the year drew to a close, reports kept coming in of more dead rhinos found with gruesome wounds or just stumps left where their horns had been.

      • Friday, December 2 – two white rhinos found shot in a private park in a mountainous region north of Johannesburg;

      • Saturday, December 3 – a black rhino found shot in the far north of South Africa near the border crossing into Zimbabwe;

    24. Deadly trade: rhino horn poaching surges

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      A marked increase in rhino horn poaching has been blamed on the growing Chinese population in Africa. On safari in Kenya, Jessica Hatcher seeks the perspective of some of China's richest and most infuential figures.

      People witnessing rhinoceros being shot have noticed a strange phenomenon: blind with panic, the usually docile animals often run nose-first into a thorn bush or area of dense vegetation, their horn buried deep within it.

    25. Ivory Smuggler Pleads Guilty in New York

      Ol Pejeta Conservancy
      Petition Organizer

      WASHINGTON – Lin Feng Xu, 31, an antique dealer in China, has pleaded guilty to smuggling and to violating the Endangered Species Act in connection with the illegal export of African elephant ivory in his carry-on luggage.

      According to documents filed in federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y ., today, a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) security officer at JFK International Airport in Queens, N.Y ., alerted inspectors with the United States Fish & Wildlife Service on September 17, 2011, that Xu, a Chinese national, was carrying suspected wildlife items in his carry-on luggage based on x-ray screening.

    Supporters

    Reasons for signing

    • matthew clayton GLAGOW, UNITED KINGDOM
      • about 2 years ago

      its disgusting.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
      • about 2 years ago

      Just disgusting since what they are killed in mutilated for is a substance very similar to fingernails which the chinese can get from putting knox gelatin in their medicine. I say ship all the rhino's that are left to any country offering the species definite reliable protection so they survive. Absolutely disgusting I can not say it enough get them the fuck out of where these ignoramuses are killing them. Countries unable to protect their wildlife do not deserve them in the first place.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • De Dahl MESA, AZ
      • about 2 years ago

      These are both beautiful animals.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Virginia Woolf AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND
      • about 2 years ago

      This wholesale indiscriminate slaughter of elephants and rhinos, for their ivory tusks and horns, is utterly barbaric, cruel and totally unacceptable in a so-called civilized world. It must stop now. Leave the wildlife alone!

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:
    • Isaiah Theden PRINCE GEORGE, VA
      • about 2 years ago

      elphants and rhinos have done nothing to humans to desrve this torture.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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