Open Platform

Change.org is an open petition platform. Anyone can use our platform regardless of who they are, where they live, and what they believe.

We do not have a position or endorse any petitions on our platform, which means the true power of Change.org is with the millions of people who use the platform every day. We are open because we believe the world is a better place when a wide range of people can stand up and speak out. That’s one of the reasons why more than 15 million people have experienced victory on Change.org.

Whether it's a mother fighting bullying in her daughter's school, customers pressing banks to drop unfair fees or citizens holding corrupt officials to account, all Change.org petitions have one thing in common: they are driven by very different people who all believe change is possible.

We believe the world will be a better place if more people embrace that vision, so we hope you’ll join us!

Different points of view

We’re an online platform for petitions—not an advocacy organization—which means we empower people everywhere to create the change they want to see.

Our openness is why you’ll see an extremely wide range of petitions on Change.org.

Local to global

There are tens of thousands of petitions started by people trying to change their communities—locally, nationally, and globally.

Fairfax County Zoning Board: Allow Mr. Grapin and his two boys keep their tree house
Cameron Dunbar-Yamaguchi
Portland, OR
United Nations: Stop the Nigerian senate from making under-age marriage the law
E. Awa
Musica Mahala, Serbia
Politics to entertainment

There are petitions about political, social, and economic issues, and petitions about entertainment, sports, and popular culture.

Secretary Clinton: Publicly support Saudi women’s right to drive

Saudi Women for Driving
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Warner Bros. Studio: Remove Ben Affleck as Batman/Bruce Wayne in the Superman & Batman movies
John Roden
Bellevue, KY
Individuals and organizations

There are petitions started by everyday people, grassroots organizations, and multinational institutions.

Governor Quinn: Don’t Let Big Plastic Bully Me!

Abby Goldberg
Grayslake, IL
Presidents Vladimir Putin and Barack Obama: Don’t Let Syria Down
Oxfam
Political diversity

There are petitions from all sides of the political spectrum.

President Obama: FEMA’s first responders to Hurricane Sandy deserve federal health care benefits
Dena Patrick
Apex, NC
US Department of Labor: Don’t hurt hardworking moms with costly regulations!

Rhea Lana Riner
Conway, AR
Opposing positions

There are even petitions on opposing sides of one issue.

Oxygen Media and DiGa Vision: Cancel Shawty Lo’s show, “All My Babies’ Mamas”
No Oxygen Coalition
New York, NY
Oxygen Network: Put Shawty Lo and Baby Mamas back on the air!

Kali Bowyer
Hilton Head Island, SC

Because we allow anyone to use our platform, everyone will find petitions on our platform with which they strongly disagree. While this can be uncomfortable at times, we see our openness as a sign of strength and a core part of building a world where creating change is a part of everyday life.

Frequently asked questions

Does Change.org endorse any of the campaigns on the site?

No, Change.org does not endorse the petitions launched on our site. We are an online platform for petitions, not an advocacy organization.

Does being an open platform mean Change.org doesn’t remove any petitions from the site?

As an open platform we house an extremely wide range of views, including perspectives that some may strongly disagree with or find offensive. Change.org is a platform for open and robust debate, so we avoid censoring content on the site.

However, like other prominent online platforms, we do remove certain content which clearly violates our our Community Guidelines including hate speech and the incitement of violence.

Has Change.org always been an open platform?

Change.org is a technology startup and, like most startups, we have evolved significantly since our early days. Change.org was started in 2007 and for our first few years, we experimented with online social fundraising, blogging and group volunteerism in an effort to empower people to create change. We always had an open petition platform as one of many features, and in 2010 Change.org was rebuilt around the petition tool. We have been deepening our commitment to empower people everywhere to create change ever since.